New York Tech PA Studies Goals and Program Outcomes

New York Tech PA Studies is focused on achieving the following program goals. Please click to view our strategies, success and outcomes.

Goal One

To train qualified PA graduates to successfully enter the healthcare profession to practice at entry-level proficiency.


OUTCOMES

The program offers a robust curriculum to achieve this goal. For example:


  1. Advanced Anatomy (PHAS 601) is taught using cadavers and includes full dissection. These formal laboratory hours amount to a total of 90 hours (6 credits) in a semester (6 hours/week for 15 weeks)
  2. Formal laboratory hours that train the PA student in clinical skills (PHAS 622, 623 and 627) account for 135 hours (5 credits) over the didactic years.
  3. Pharmacology (PHAS 620 and 621) has six (6) dedicated credits, which equals 90 hours in this subject. In addition to these courses, pharmaco-therapeutics is taught in multiple other courses such as Clinical Medicine I, II, and III, Clinical Decision Making, Surgery, Women's Health, Pediatrics, Orthopedics and Rheumatology and others.

Indicators of success for these expected program outcomes:

  • All students passing the Physician Assistant National Certification Examination (PANCE) at or higher than the national mean.
    • All our students over the past four years have received scores at or above the national mean for PANCE.
    • The last three cohorts achieved a 100% first time takers pass rate.
      Five Year First Time Taker Report

  • Clinical Preceptor Evaluation of preparedness for rotation: The program surveys preceptors annually for how prepared they believe our students are to begin their rotations. The scale used is a 1–10 Likert scale with an 8 indicating "well prepared" and a 9 indicating "very well prepared." The overall cohort averages were 8.78 (CO 2016), 9.07 (CO 2017), and 9.14 (CO 2018) indicating that preceptors felt New York Tech PA students were "well prepared" to "extremely well prepared" for their clinical rotations.

Goal Two

To provide opportunities for students to collaborate and develop effective oral and written communication skills so that they can work efficiently within the healthcare team.


OUTCOMES

Opportunities provided by the program:


  1. Throughout the didactic and clinical years, the students have the opportunity to work with standardized patients in the Institute for Clinical Competence (ICC). They are evaluated on their medical knowledge, practical skills as well as their interpersonal and communication skills and professionalism.
  2. Oral and written presentations skills are assessed in multiple didactic course including, but not limited to, PHAS 660 PA Professions, PHAS 622, 623 and 627 - Clinical Skills courses, PHAS 650 Research I, PHAS 680 Clinical Decision Making and PHAS 690 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.
  3. Both oral and written communication skills are an integral component of the objectives in all clinical rotations, and preceptors and the faculty assess them throughout the program.
  4. During clinical rotations, the students are evaluated on their communication skills with patients, families and the healthcare team.

An indicator of success of these expected program outcomes is demonstrated by our students' history taking and patient interviewing skills as assessed during clinical rotations.

Benchmark: At least 90% of students will be rated by the preceptor as above average or outstanding.

Outcome: The previous 3 graduating class have surpassed the benchmark. (See chart)

Percent Of Students Rated Excellent Or Outstanding History Taking

Goal Three

To offer opportunities to cultivate graduates to be compassionate and culturally competent professionals who will continue to contribute to society and the PA profession.


OUTCOMES

Opportunities provided by the program:


  1. PHAS 635 Behavioral Medicine includes several topics on how to approach subject matters that are sensitive to patients during encounters, that include but are not limited to, patients with sexually transmitted diseases, breaking bad news, dealing with death and dying etc. as well as how to handle a difficult patient. The students role-play case based scenarios and also have the opportunity to work with Standardized Patients in the Institute of Clinical Competence and are evaluated on their compassion and ability to maintain their professionalism. They work through various exercises that exposes them to diverse cultural beliefs and values.
  2. Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) opportunities are offered throughout the three years of the program.
    1. PHAS 660, PA Professional Issues, lays the groundwork for the student to interact with other healthcare professionals. Each student interviews two healthcare professionals (one a PA) to learn about their roles within the healthcare team. The disciplines have included MD/DO, OT, PT, RN, NP's, Chiropractors, Dietitians, Pharmacists and Respiratory Therapists. The focus of the interview is to compare education models, history of the profession, scope of practice etc. and how they work within the interdisciplinary health system.
    2. An Interprofessional Educational initiative between several of the School of Health Professions programs, (nursing, PT, OT, PA) and the NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) has been held annually over the past four years. Students from all disciplines participate (either directly or through observation) in a case based scenario that demonstrates the team-based approach to the patient.
    3. Code-Blue: An Interdisciplinary simulated advanced code is run annually by the Nursing department includes the participation of PA and DO students. The program is part of PHAS 665 Emergency Medicine and all 2nd year PA students participate in the simulation that is run in the Institute for Clinical Competence (ICC).

    Indicators of success of these expected program outcomes:

    During clinical rotations, the students are evaluated on their communication skills with patients, families and the healthcare team. Students being evaluated on their communication skills with patients, families and the healthcare team on their clinical rotations.

    Benchmark: At least 90% of students will be rated by the preceptor as excellent or outstanding.

    Outcome: The previous 3 graduating class have surpassed the benchmark (see chart).

    Percent Of Students Rated Excellent Or Outstanding Communication Skills
  3. Contributions to society: Each year students from all three cohorts are involved in community outreach initiatives. These have included fundraising runs, toy drives, and food donations, promoting a reading initiative, clothing drive for refugees and the homeless, care packages for soldiers and activities with veterans. Students are continuously encouraged to bring forth new initiatives they are passionate about to the program for consideration.

    Indicators of success of these expected program outcomes:

    Students continuously participate in local and global outreach. In years past, students have donated food to local charities such as Long Island Harvest and items of winter clothing to the United Veterans Beacon House. They also participate in various events related to the medical field such as volunteering and raising money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society through the Pineapple Run/Ocean to Sound Relay since 2014, NYIT Health and Medical Academy, and providing injury prevention education at summer camps around the area. In 2016 and 2017 PA students were chosen as recipients for the Edward Guiliano Global Fellowship where they have delivered medical services to various underprivileged areas world-wide.
  4. Contribute to the PA profession: The program strongly encourages student involvement in the state and national professional organizations to nurture their involvement in advancing and contributing to the PA profession.

    Indicators of success of these expected program outcomes are demonstrated by:

Goal Four

To promote a lifelong career of continuous self-directed learning, self-assessment, professional development and build a foundation for competence in research.


OUTCOMES

The Master's thesis project the PA student must complete prior to graduation progresses through the three years beginning with a course in Epidemiology and Interpretation of the Medical Literature. This path includes several other research courses that the program offers to reach its goal in preparing students for a lifelong career of continuous self-directed learning, self-assessment, and professional development, and building a foundation for competence in research.

Indicators of success of these expected program outcomes:


  1. The students present their research during ALETHEIA, the Annual Research Symposium at NYIT-Long Island.
  2. Several groups of students have presented their work at the New York State Society of Physician Assistants (NYSSPA) as well as at the American Academy of Physician Assistant (AAPA) conferences. Many have been recognized with awards.
    Poster presentations at 2018 AAPA conference:
    1. Are New York State High School Football Coaches Adequately Recognizing and Managing the Signs and Symptoms of Concussion? Kaitlin Allsop, Katherine Kraus, Jillian Picinich, Margaret VanLandingham, and David Jackson.
    2. A Woman's Choice of Contraception: What Really Matters? Kayla M. Alogna, Victoria L. Caputo, Michael A. Esposito, Kiriaki Fotiadis, Raeanne M. Quaresma, and David I. Jackson.
    3. The 1918 Spanish Flu, where are we 100 years later? Devon Abele, Meghan Leusch, Angelee Nuce, Ariana Philbin, and David Jackson.
    4. What services can a patient expect to receive from an Urgent Care Center? Cristin Ciaravino, Katie Fargnoli, Matthew Stapelkamp, Preston Yu, and David Jackson.
  3. Principal faculty continue to be involved in scholarship and are role models for the students.
    1. Corri Wolf:
      • Created CME modules with AAPA to improve PAs knowledge and treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity.
      • Diabetes Leadership Edge: Advancing PA Leadership in the Management of Type 2 Diabetes
      • Obesity Leadership Edge: A PA-Driven Chronic Care Model for the Management of Overweight and Obesity
      • Hayes S., Wolf C., LabbĂ© S., Peterson E., and Murray S. Primary health care providers' roles and responsibilities: A qualitative exploration of 'who does what' in the treatment and management of persons affected by obesity. Journal of Communication in Healthcare (2017): 1-10.
    2. Kristine Prazak-Davoli:
      • Prazak, K., The Introduction of Virtual Patient Software to Enhance Physician Assistant Student Knowledge in Palliative Medicine. Journal of Allied Health Volume 46, Issue 4, December 2017 pp 71E-76E
    3. Barbara Piccirillo:
      • In 2016, a team of third year students took their study, "How Do P.A.s Learn Ultrasound?" to the 2016 New York State Society of Physician Assistants CME Conference. In 2017 a team of second year PA students participated in the first ever ultrasound competition at the AAPA annual conference and took third place out of 16 other PA program teams. Professor Barbara Piccirillo, the resident expert faculty on point of care ultrasound, led both groups.
    4. Sara Winter:
      • JAAPA-D-18-00176R1, entitled "Case Presentation: Seronegative Lyme Disease" (Accepted for publication 2019).