Occupational Therapy, OTD
Curriculum

Major Requirements

Year One Credits:
OCTH 602 Gross Anatomy 4
The overall objective of this course is the investigation of all major anatomical areas by region. The focus of the course is on musculoskeletal and neurological anatomy of the extremities, back, neck, and head. Lectures cover the anatomical structures to be dissected in the laboratory and address the organization, histological, and embryological development of the various regions. The functional anatomy of the musculoskeletal structures is emphasized. Specific instructions are provided to the student to encourage an efficient dissection.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-5-4
OCTH 604 Introduction to Occupational Therapy 3
Students will learn the history, philosophy and foundational theories of occupational therapy and its effects and significance on current practice. Students will also be introduced to the topics of professionalism, evidence based practice and ethics under current legislation within the field of occupational therapy. Official documents of the profession are presented as students learn about the various professional organizations and associations that support and promote the profession. The importance of professionalism, professional development, cultural sensitivity and ethics on the practice of occupational therapy are reinforced. This course will prepare students for subsequent coursework and fieldwork. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
OCTH 606 Professional Development Seminar 1 1
This seminar is the first of four courses that will guide the student through the process of professional development. The focus throughout the courses will be on the development of a wide range of skills and attributes that comprise professionalism. Students will engage in self-reflection, self-assessment, goal setting and various activities that promote professional growth. Students will begin to develop their professional portfolio in this course and will continue it throughout each of the seminars. Students will also identify, engage in and document one professional development activity outside of this course per semester. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 1-0-1

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-0-1
OCTH 607 Childhood Development 2
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 604 Corequisites: OCTH 615, OCTH 608, OCTH 609

This course introduces the student to theories and factors that influence human growth and development from birth through adolescence, and explores how these factors are embedded in the scope of occupational therapy. The student, through lectures, readings, observations, classroom exercises, and assignments, examines the elements that influence normal development in order to understand the role these factors play in occupational therapy practice. Topics includes prenatal development, reflexes, motor, musculoskeletal, cognitive and perceptual development.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
OCTH 608 Adult Development and Geriatrics 2
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 604 Corequisites: OCTH 607, OCTH 609, OCTH 615

This course introduces the students to age-related changes across adulthood in areas of social, cognitive, and physical functioning. Changes to occupational performance in daily activities, social roles and relationships, loss and death will be examined through the life span. Students will explore other concepts that affect functioning across the life span such as motivation, personality and stress.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-0-2
OCTH 609 Fieldwork I: Psychosocial Conditions 3
This course provides an exploration of psychosocial conditions in mental health occupational therapy practice. Focus is on the classification of mental disorders categorized in the DSM 5.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
OCTH 612 Conditions in Pediatrics 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 603, OCTH 604, OCTH 606 Corequisites: OCTH 619, OCTH 614, OCTH 613, OCTH 645, OCTH 646

This course will provide an overview of pathological conditions commonly encountered in the practice of pediatric occupational therapy. The course will cover the clinical presentation of pathological conditions, prognosis, diagnostics, medical treatment interventions, and the implications for the occupational therapy provider. The student, through lectures, readings, observations, classroom exercises, and assignments, examines the elements that influence and hinder development in order to understand the role these factors play in occupational therapy practice. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
OCTH 613 Neuroscience 3
This is an introduction to the science of the nervous system for the physical and occupational therapist that provides the basic understanding of the anatomy of the nervous system and its function. A review of the histology and embryology of the major divisions of the nervous system is followed by a systems approach to the study of the special senses, cognition, and psychological and motor functions. Functional aspects of neuroscience are explored through examples of common neurological clinical problems in order to provide a solid foundation for planning therapeutic interventions.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
OCTH 614 Physical Conditions in Adults 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 604, OCTH 608, OCTH 611 Corequisites: OCTH 619, OCTH 612, OCTH 613, OCTH 645, OCTH 646

This course will provide an overview of pathological conditions commonly encountered in the practice of occupational therapy with adults. The course will cover the clinical presentation of pathological conditions, prognosis, diagnostics, medical treatment interventions, and the implications for the occupational therapy provider. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
OCTH 615 Kinesiology 4
Kinesiology is the study of human motion as applied to evaluation of joint motion and muscle function. Palpation of joints, bony prominences, and muscles as well as manual muscle testing, range of motion, and goniometry skills will be addressed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
OCTH 616 Theories and Models in Occupational Therapy 3
In this course students are introduced to the different models, theories, and frameworks that occupational therapy practitioners use to guide evidence-based practice. Theories, frameworks, and practice models guide the occupational therapy process from evaluation to assessment and intervention planning and outcomes. Students will also learn the concepts of occupational science and its relation to occupational therapy theory.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
OCTH 618 Professional Development Seminar 2 1
This seminar is the second of four courses that will guide the student through the process of professional development. The focus throughout the courses will be on the development of a wide range of skills and attributes that comprise professionalism. Students will engage in self-reflection, self-assessment, goal setting and various activities that promote professional growth. Students will continue to develop their professional portfolio and actively participate in the mentor/mentee relationship. Students will also identify, engage in and document one professional development activity that occurs outside of this course per semester.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-0-1
OCTH 619 Context, Occupation, and Task Analysis 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 604, OCTH 616 Corequisites: OCTH 612, OCTH 614, OCTH 613, OCTH 646

This course introduces students to the concept of occupation and the role of occupation as the philosophical underpinning of the profession of occupational therapy. Context, occupation and task analysis are explored from the lens of how context shapes and influences occupational performance in the impact on health and well-being. The student will begin to analyze human activity for the purpose of facilitating occupational performance. Lecture, class discussions, readings, written and oral assignments, laboratory exercise and online discussions are used to facilitate learning. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-2-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-2-3
OCTH 645 Research I: Research Methods in Occupational Therapy 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 604 Corequsites: OCTH 612, OCTH 613, OCTH 641

This course introduces the students to the foundational concepts in statistics and research methods in occupational therapy (OT). Through lectures and textbook readings, the students will be introduced to basic descriptive, inferential and correlational statistics, the research process, research methods, psychometric properties, sampling, and evidence-based practice. The lab will provide in-class individual and group exercises that allow the students to apply the knowledge gained in class using outcome-directed assignments such as identifying clinical research questions, locating and retrieving research articles, creating literature reviews, reading and interpreting statistics, critiquing research articles, appraising evidence, and constructing surveys. By the end of this course the students will learn how to use evidence and research findings in making robust and relevant clinical decisions for the client, group, or populations.

OCTH 650 Professional Development Seminar 3 2
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 606, OCTH 618 Corequisites: OCTH 645, OCTH 619

This course is the final course in the professional development series for OTO students. While students examined ways in which they can be reflective practitioners, and engaged in self-reflection, self-assessment, goal setting and various activities that promote professional growth in previous courses, in this course, students begin to actively engage in comprehensive and in-depth scholarly activities by developing an initial idea regarding the capstone project. The project allows the students to synthesize and apply the knowledge gained in previous courses and throughout the curriculum. Students will work in-depth on developing initial components for a scholarly capstone project that involves one or more of the following areas in relevance to the anticipated doctoral experience later in the curriculum: Clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, or theory development. Those components include learning and applying the professions ethical standards, application of theory that informs the project, learning professional communications, including the importance of a professional social media presence, and initial work on developing learning objectives needed for the capstone project experience. Students will also gain insight into their own health, well-being and quality of life and recognize its importance for participating in the role of occupational therapy doctoral student.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-0-2
 
Year Two Credits:
OCTH 700 Health Promotion: Societal and Community Advocacy 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 604, OCTH 616 Corequisites: OCTH 701

The Health Promotion: Societal and Community Advocacy course is designed to enable the occupational therapy student to learn and develop the skills necessary to transform communities into healthier societies. Students learn to incorporate occupational therapy theory and frameworks with local, national and global societal health initiatives to address health policy, health systems and health equity factors. Students incorporate a client-centered approach to advocating and promoting health at the individual, community and organization level with all stakeholders. Students expose the voice of community members and cultivate inter-professional and cross-collaborative approaches for meeting population health needs and addressing health disparities. A major focus of this course is the students’ ability to examine client factors, culture, contexts, the environment and health determinants for understanding sociocultural norms related to epidemiology, prevention, chronic disease, injury, disability, trauma, substance abuse, violence, maternal and child and healthy lifestyles for social, emotional and physical well-being. Students learn to apply health promotion theories, models and evidence based practice strategies with traditional, innovative, high-impact and technology-based approaches for health promotion program planning and program evaluation that meet the diverse needs of local, national and global society.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
OCTH 701 Research II: Applied Research in Occupational Therapy 3
This course introduces the students to different applied research designs both quantitative and qualitative such as randomized clinical trials, experimental designs, single-subject designs, and epidemiology studies. Through lecture and textbook readings, students will learn the foundation of the procedures of various research methods, and then through the lab engage in experiential learning to apply the knowledge gained in class through various assignments on designing and implementing different types of research methods. This also includes completion of mock research practices such as IRB applications, quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, experimental designs, needs assessments and participatory research. This course also exposes them to dissemination strategies to report findings through various options including submitting a publication or grant application, engaging in peer review process, poster presentation and conference presentation. By the end of this course students will have practiced many of the necessary tools to engage in the research process that will help them in future courses and as future leaders and clinical researchers in OT.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-1-3
OCTH 705 Doctoral Capstone Preparation 1 (w/lab) 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 650, OCTH 701

This course prepares students to actively engage in comprehensive and in-depth scholarly activities by developing a capstone project while collaborating with a faculty capstone mentor/advisor. The project allows the students to synthesize and apply the knowledge gained in previous courses throughout the curriculum. The project will involve designing, implementing, and evaluating a scholarly study that aligns with the profession's current research priorities and is meant to advance knowledge translation, clinical or professional practices, service delivery, and professional issues. The topic of the project will be designed in one of four scholarship categories: Scholarship of Discovery, Scholarship of Integration, Scholarship of Application, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Within these four categories, the students will work in-depth on a scholarly study that involves one or more of the following areas in relevance to the anticipated doctoral experience later in the curriculum: Clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, or theory development. The students will work with the faculty mentor to a) design a formal evaluation plan that will set individualized and specific objectives and ensures thorough assessment of the project outcomes; b) explore the supervision plan, which will follow a specific outline, and be co-created with the site supervisor and c) begin development of the formal proposal.

OCTH 707 Fieldwork I: OT Assessment in Pediatrics 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 604, OCTH 613, OCTH 615, OCTH 607, OCTH 612 Corequisites: OCTH 709, OCTH 714, OCTH 736

This course will provide an overview of assessment methods, screenings and tools that are used within the practice of pediatric settings. Drawing on foundations of study in anatomy, kinesiology, Development of the Child and Physical Conditions of the Child, students will learn to engage in clinical reasoning skills drawing from a variety of theoretical perspectives as they learn how to select and implement assessments based on the specific diagnosis, presentation and functional complaints of the child. Level 1 pediatric experience, case studies and videos will be utilized to reflect current pediatric occupational therapy practice. In addition, hands on learning activities will integrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes important for established and emerging areas of pediatric occupational therapy. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-3-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-3-3
OCTH 709 OT Assessment in Psychosocial Disorders 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 604, OCTH 607, OCTH 608, OCTH 612, OCTH 609, OCTH 614 Corequisites: OCTH 707, OCTH 714, OCTH 736

The OT Assessment in Psychosocial Disorders/Lab course builds on the Psychosocial Disorders course and expands learning on theory, frames of reference, and evidence based practice as they influence evaluation, screening and assessment with clients whose psychosocial deficits impact performance. Students learn assessment strategies and outcome measure tools essential for client-centered intervention planning. Students begin to utilize beginning clinical reasoning skills as they explore ethical, cultural, social and political factors associated with mental health practice. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-3-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-3
OCTH 714 Assessment in Physical Dysfunctions 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 603, OCTH 613, OCTH 615 Corequisites: OCTH 707, OCTH 709, OCTH 736

This class will provide an overview of assessment methods, screenings, and tools that are used within the practice of physical disabilities settings. Students will learn to engage in clinical reasoning skills as they learn how to select and implement assessments based on the specific diagnosis, presentation, and functional complaints of the client. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-3-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-3-3
OCTH 736 Administration, Leadership, and Entrepreneurship 3
The Administration, Leadership and Entrepreneurship course is designed to enable the occupational therapy student to learn, develop and apply management, leadership and entrepreneurial principles and skills which are guided by foundational, theoretical and evidence-based approaches in occupational therapy. Students will become leaders and agents of change by addressing sociopolitical issues through advocacy and innovative health policy initiatives. Students will utilize diverse, inter-disciplinary approaches for leading, managing and developing traditional and novel practices and programs which address ethical, equitable, cultural, social and political factors in alignment with local, national and global societal issues. Students will further develop their professional portfolio. Student will learn and demonstrate ability to transform innovative policy-driven ideas into academic and community-based curriculum, business plans and grant proposals which are timely and essential tools necessary for addressing population, policy and sociocultural norms.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
OCTH 744 Upper Extremities and Hand Therapy 4
This class will provide an overview of assessment methods, screenings, and tools that are used within the practice of physical disabilities settings. Students will learn to engage in clinical reasoning skills as they learn how to select and implement assessments based on the specific diagnosis, presentation, and functional complaints of the client. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-3-4

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
OCTH 750 OT Interventions In Physical Conditions 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 613, OCTH 615, OCTH 614 Corequisites: OCTH 777, OCTH 799, OCTH 744, OCTH 780, OCTH 781, OCTH 782

In this class students will develop the skills necessary to create and implement comprehensive intervention plans to maximize engagement in occupation for clients with a wide variety of diagnoses within the physical rehabilitation setting. Diagnoses include, but are not limited to stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, amputations, joint replacements, and cardiac conditions. Students will learn to utilize assessment findings in order to create individualized intervention plans utilizing available resources and evidence based research. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-3-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-3-3
OCTH 777 OT Interventions in Pediatrics 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 615, OCTH 607, OCTH 612, OCTH 707 Corequisites: OCTH 799, OCTH 744, OCTH 750, OCTH 780, OCTH 781, OCTH 782

This course allows the student to develop the more advanced clinical reasoning skills needed to develop and implement client centered interventions that meet the needs of children and their families within various pediatric settings. Drawing on foundations of study in anatomy, kinesiology, Development of the Child, Physical Conditions of the Child and Occupational Therapy Assessments in Pediatrics students will learn to engage in clinical reasoning skills drawing from a variety of theoretical perspectives as they learn how to select and implement interventions based on evidence based practice in relation to the child’s specific diagnosis, presentation and functional complaints. Readings, lectures, case studies and videos will be utilized to reflect current pediatric occupational therapy practice. In addition, hands on learning activities will integrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes important for established and emerging areas of pediatric occupational therapy. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-3-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-3-3
OCTH 780 Innovative Assistive Technology and Universal Design 2
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 603, OCTH 613, OCTH 615, OCTH 614, OCTH 612, OCTH 714, OCTH 707, OCTH 709 Corequisites: OCTH 777, OCTH 799, OCTH 744, OCTH 750, OCTH 781, OCTH 782

n this course, students will learn to develop creative solutions to meet the unique needs of individuals living with disability. Through the use of didactic lectures, guest speakers, assigned readings, field trips, and case-based projects, students will learn to develop innovative solutions to maximize client engagement in occupation. Students will learn about principles of universal design, accessibility, and assistive technology. Throughout the course, students will be guided in the selection of technology applications to assist with mobility, communication, personal care, and engagement in work, school, play, and leisure. Technologies covered include seating and wheeled mobility, environmental control, augmentative communication, computer access, and assistive technology for learning. Students will work collaboratively within their own department as well as with other departments and resources on campus to address barriers to participation in occupation.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-0-2
OCTH 781 Interprofessional Education and Collaboration 1
This course introduces the students to the professional concept of Interprofessional Education and Collaboration (IPEC) and its importance in promoting the highest-quality and most comprehensive health care for clients, groups, and populations. The key components of IPEC values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, interprofessional communication, and teamwork will be explored via case studies, readings, and group exercises.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-0-1
OCTH 782 Doctoral Capstone Preparation 2 (w/lab) 2
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 704 Corequisites: OCTH 777, OCTH 799, OCTH 744, OCTH 750, OCTH 780, OCTH 781

This course is a continuation of the process for students to actively engage in comprehensive and in depth scholarly activities by developing a capstone project while collaborating with a faculty capstone mentor/advisor. The project allows the students to synthesize and apply the knowledge gained in previous courses, especially OCTH 704, and throughout the curriculum. The project will involve designing, implementing, and evaluating a scholarly capstone project that aligns with the profession's current research priorities and is meant to advance knowledge translation, clinical or professional practices, service delivery, and professional issues. Students will work in-depth on a scholarly capstone project that involves one or more of the following areas in relevance to the anticipated doctoral experience later in the curriculum: Clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, or theory development. The students will work with the faculty mentor to a) continue development of the formal proposal; b) work with chosen site to implement and complete a needs assessment; c) design their individual 14-week experience week by week; d) complete and present their formal capstone proposal.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-1-2
OCTH 799 OT Interventions in Psychosocial Disorders and Group Process 3
The OT Interventions in Psychosocial & Group Process course advances learning from the OT Assessment in Psychosocial Disorders course and builds on evaluation, screening and assessment methods with clients whose psychosocial deficits impact performance. Students develop and implement client-centered interventions based on areas of occupation for both individual and group settings. Students explore group dynamics and the structure, function, and theories of group process as used by the occupational therapist. Students apply therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning skills based on ethical, cultural, social and political factors which influence mental health treatment and therapeutic interventions for group practice. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-3-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-3-3
 
Year Three Credits:
OCTH 850 Clinical Reasoning and Professional Development 2
The Clinical Reasoning and Professional Development course enables students to reflect, analyze, critique, and build upon their knowledge and experience from level II fieldwork, in order to expand their capacity to provide occupational therapy services which align with the scope and vision of the profession. Students learn to develop interpersonal and professional skills essential for practicing as a beginning level occupational therapist. Students identify their strengths and growth areas related to clinical reasoning and clinical competency in preparation for board certification and practice. Emphasis on local, national, and global service delivery enables students to expand their possibilities in choosing career options in traditional and emerging practice areas. Students apply prior learning based on evidence and ethical, cultural, social and political factors and develop a plan for success. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-0-2

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-0-2
OCTH 893 Fieldwork II-A (12 weeks) 6
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 609, OCTH 612, OCTH 707

Level II fieldwork is a full-time immersive clinical experience where students will deliver occupational therapy services to varied populations in diverse settings and contexts. “The goal of Level II fieldwork is to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapy practitioners. Level II fieldwork must be integral to the program’s curriculum design and must include an in-depth experience in delivering occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on the application of purposeful and meaningful occupation and research, administration, and management of occupational therapy services. It is recommended that the student be exposed to a variety of clients across the lifespan and to a variety of settings.” (ACOTE, 2018). After satisfactory completion of the didactic courses and level I fieldwork, the student will begin the first of two clinical education placements that can take place in a variety of traditional or nontraditional settings, that meet the selection criteria of the program, in accordance with the standards articulated by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE ®). Fieldwork Level IIA is a 12-week, full-time experience designed to foster continued professional clinical competence and growth under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist. The student is expected to increase skill level at progressively higher levels of performance with the goal of developing entry level practitioner skills by the completion of the fieldwork experience.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 0-6-6
OCTH 894 Fieldwork II-B (12 weeks) 6
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: OCTH 602, OCTH 707, OCTH 609, OCTH 612, OCTH 707, OCTH 893

Level II fieldwork is a full-time immersive clinical experience where students will deliver occupational therapy services to varied populations in diverse settings and contexts. “The goal of Level II fieldwork is to develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupational therapy practitioners. Level II fieldwork must be integral to the program’s curriculum design and must include an in-depth experience in delivering occupational therapy services to clients, focusing on the application of purposeful and meaningful occupation and research, administration, and management of occupational therapy services. It is recommended that the student be exposed to a variety of clients across the lifespan and to a variety of settings.” (ACOTE, 2018). After satisfactory completion of the didactic courses and level I fieldwork, the student will begin the first of two clinical education placements that can take place in a variety of traditional or nontraditional settings, that meet the selection criteria of the program, in accordance with the standards articulated by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE ®). Fieldwork Level IIA is a 12-week, full-time experience designed to foster continued professional clinical competence and growth under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist. The student is expected to increase skill level at progressively higher levels of performance with the goal of developing entry level practitioner skills by the completion of the fieldwork experience. experience designed to foster continued professional clinical competence and growth under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist. The student is expected to increase skill level at progressively higher levels of performance with the goal of developing entry level practitioner skills by the completion of the fieldwork experience. Completion of Level IIA and IIB meets the 24-week minimum level II fieldwork requirement

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 0-3-3
OCTH 897 Doctoral Capstone Experience (14 weeks) 6
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: OCTH 782

This individual 14-week doctoral capstone experience (DCE) is offered to allow students to complete the previously designed doctoral capstone project (DCP). This experience consists of fieldwork hours on a site relevant to the capstone project area and starts upon the completion of all academic coursework, clinical fieldwork requirements, and doctoral capstone project planning. The DCE site will expose the student to one of the following areas: clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, or theory development. By the end of this course students, in collaboration with the DCP, will finalize their individual capstone projects and then share and/or present their findings in appropriate forms or venues (e.g., publications, presentations, posters, etc.).

 
Total Program Requirements = 99 credits