COVID-19: University Communications

A Message from Provost Gonzales:
Pass/Fail Option for Spring/Cycle D Courses

March 25, 2020

Dear New York Tech Students, 

In recognition of the many challenges our students are facing this semester, we are allowing you to have your final grades for any Spring 2020 semester and Cycle D 2020 courses to be recorded as Pass (P) or Fail (F) in lieu of a letter grade. 

You can make this decision AFTER you see your final letter grade, but must make the decision within 14 days of the posting of your grade. A Pass grade (P) will have no impact on your semester GPA or cumulative GPA. A Fail grade (F), just like an F, will have a negative impact on your GPA. 

Depending on your major (particularly in the School of Health Professions) and your status (i.e., on probation, veteran students, Dean's or President's list), there might be other consequences for selecting a Pass/Fail grade. You are strongly encouraged to speak to your advisor, as well as staff in financial aid or international education or your athletic advisor, if applicable, prior to making the Pass/Fail choice. 

The details of this policy can be viewed here

Please stay safe and let us know how we can help if you are having any problems. Our Student FAQs page provides updated information and resources, and you can also submit your questions on our Online Student Help Form

Sincerely,
Junius Gonzales, M.D., M.B.A.
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs


A Message from President Foley

March 21, 2020

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Dear New York Tech Students,

Welcome back! I hope you and your loved ones are well and that you’ve been able to get some rest over Spring Recess, despite the COVID-19 outbreak. Over the last week we have adapted to the spread of this virus and made necessary changes. These changes are made both to protect your health and to keep you on track toward your degree. As much as this pandemic is an upset to normal life right now, eventually we will get back to normal, a new normal.

We are looking at both the short term and the long term, and we want you to do the same. In the coming weeks and months, you will need to switch rapidly back and forth between short-term, here-and-now issues, and future thinking, as the need arises. Why is this important for us to ask you to do? It is because we want you to be successful in the pursuit of your goals and ambitions (long term, future-oriented) while staying healthy and on track in the midst of this crisis (short term, here-and-now).

We think constantly about the student experience; improving it substantially is so important to us that it is at the core of our new strategic planning and our daily decision making. We know that the ultimate student experience is that of successfully obtaining your degree and starting on your professional career. That success is the reward for all your hard work here at Tech, and we remain resolutely committed to you achieving that goal. COVID-19 changes how we provide your education, but it does not change why we provide it. Our mission is clear, and we will sustain it, as we sustain you and our commitment to you.

While you have been on break, our staff and faculty have been working feverishly to prepare for the resumption of classes on Monday, March 23. Teaching everything remotely is exciting and challenging, but we are committed to doing it. Further, so that you can plan and not lose time, we will use remote teaching modalities through the remainder of this spring semester.

What follows are updates specifying how we have adapted to this point. Because the situation continues to evolve quickly, by that I mean the expectations of us from regional, state and the federal government change rapidly, further adaptations will be needed, and we will update you frequently.

Here is where things stand at present:

Academic Updates

BEGINNING MONDAY MARCH 23, all classes will be held remotely for the duration of the semester. As previously communicated, your instructors will be contacting you directly regarding schedules, coursework, and other course-related information. Please refer to our Academic FAQs (log-in required) for additional information.

Counseling and Wellness

Remote counseling and mental health services are available. If you need help, don’t hesitate to reach out for it. The Office of Student Life will provide more information on how to access these resources remotely.

International Student Updates

We know that this is a time of extra anxiety and stress for those of you who have come to Tech from other countries, and we empathize with you. Know that we care very much about you and we will do everything in our power to keep you safe, healthy, and learning. Please make sure to use our wellness and counseling services to the fullest.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS can find more information in our International Student FAQs (log-in required). We hope that your situation will remain stable, but if it evolves we will continuously update these FAQs as is necessary. PLEASE check the FAQs and social media daily.

Residence Halls Updates

A related area of concern is the disposition of the residence halls and our plans for them. Like almost every other school in the nation, we are seeking to reduce significantly the number of students in the residence halls. This is being done to reduce the density of the population so that community viral transfer rates will decrease. Therefore, only international students who cannot return to their countries and those domestic students who have no other viable living option will be allowed to remain in residence.

To initiate this process, the dean of students contacted residential students on Wednesday, March 19, and strongly encouraged all those who could vacate to do so by 5 p.m. on Sunday, March 22, 2020. We also know that some students were not able to meet this first deadline. So, we are allowing a limited number of students to remain in residence until March 31, whereupon they too shall depart. After March 31, only those students who are not able to return to their home countries, or who have extenuating circumstances here in the U.S., will remain in residence. Student Life will provide information about prorated residency credits for students in their first, second, or third years and refunds for students who are finishing their studies this semester.

This information and updates will be posted in our Residential Students FAQs (log-in required).

Campus Access, Hours of Operations, and Food Services

The new campus access policy, shared on Thursday, March 19, and effective Monday, March 23, 2020 states that, as is consistent with state mandates, NO STUDENTS SHOULD COME TO THE CAMPUSES. This applies to those of you who are student workers. Just to be very clear, no students should plan to come to the New York campuses. We need you to stay home, to stay safe, and to stay healthy.

There is one exception and that is for students who need food. For example, there are students at the Old Westbury Campus who live off campus, but have a meal plan. For these students, boxed food will be available for grab-and-go at the Student Activities Building (SAC) on the Long Island campus. Grab-and-go food will also be provided at the Metro Café at the New York City campus.

Campus Events

All upcoming New York Tech-sponsored events have been postponed, canceled, or are being held remotely. We’ve posted information as it becomes available for each event on our online events calendar.

Our traditional commencement that is to take place on Sunday May 17, 2020, is most likely going to be postponed. In the likely event that should happen, please know we are studying ways to hold an alternative kind of virtual graduation ceremony or to hold the ceremony at a later date. We will update you on this in the near future.

A small version of a significant, virtual ceremony took place on March 20: Our fourth-year medical students celebrated during NYITCOM’s first-ever virtual residency match day via a livestream. We wish them much luck in their future endeavors.

For More Information

There is no doubt that more will be happening, and the situation will change in the upcoming weeks as authorities respond to the epidemic with new guidance, regulations, and plans. So, we need you to stay in contact with us in order to be sure you have the latest information.

We will use the following to get you that information:

  • Continuous updates will be provided daily on nyit.edu/alerts.
  • General health updates and other communications are available at nyit.edu/covid.
  • Helpful student resources, FAQs, and other information specific to students are available in the yellow Coronavirus Information tile on the NYIT app and web portal at my.nyit.edu (log-in required).

Thank you again. Our new interconnectivity offers great promise. Together, we will learn to cope with this new reality, continue to reach out to help and support each other, and ultimately, prevail. And, remember your goal is to get to your degree and to start your career. We are committed to getting you to that success, even in the midst of all this difficulty. So, stay healthy, optimistic, and most of all stay focused on your goals!

Sincerely,

Hank Foley, Ph.D.
President, New York Institute of Technology


A Message from President Foley:
New York Campuses Access Policy: Effective March 23

March 19, 2020

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Dear New York Tech Community:

To ensure the continued operations and the safety of our community, we are instituting the following campus access policy, effective March 23, 2020 and until further notice:

New York Campus Operations: All employees are strongly encouraged to work remotely. Students, including student workers, should NOT come to campus. While New York campuses are closed for classes, limited access between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m, Monday thru Friday, will be permitted only for necessary work 

Faculty: Faculty who can work remotely should NOT come to campus. Faculty members who cannot teach from home may have access to their office to facilitate the teaching of their class; when done, they should leave campus. If faculty members have ongoing experiments that require their attention, they may go to their labs and then should leave when done.

Staff: Employees who can work remotely should NOT come to campus. Those who must be on campus to do their work should check with their managers before they go to campus. 

Students: Once again, students, including student workers, should NOT come to campus.

Any faculty or staff member whose work requires them to come to campus must check in with security. At the Long Island campus, you will need to enter via the Main Campus Road and proceed to the parking lot on the right. On the New York City campus, you will be met at the building entrance to check in. Please have your NYIT ID ready to display at both campuses.

Thank you for your continuing cooperation and support.

Sincerely,

Hank Foley, Ph.D.
President, New York Institute of Technology


A Message from President Foley:
Campus Entry Protocol: March 16-18

March 15, 2020

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Thank you for your continued patience as we respond to the ever-changing needs of our campus in order to ensure the safety and health of our entire New York Tech community. We have developed a method to assess access to the Long Island campus buildings to keep our campus community as healthy as possible. This method will be implemented for March 16, 17, and 18. The campus is closed for Spring Recess on March 19 and 20. As stated previously, all employees are encouraged to telecommute and work remotely, as is practical. We will update you as any new information becomes available.

Below is the approach for campus access on March 16-18:

  • West Road campus access will be closed.
  • Main Campus Road will be the only campus entry point. Main Campus Road will have a security checkpoint with two security guards. All staff, faculty, and students will be asked to provide the information on the check-in sheet below. All campus visitors, including clinic clients and vendors making deliveries, will also be asked to check in and provide the requested information.

Please note, after providing the check-in information:

  • Staff and faculty will have access to their spaces.
  • Students will only have access to Riland and Serota.
  • Clinic clients will have access to Riland.
  • Vendors will have access to the buildings necessary to make their required deliveries.

Below is the check-in sheet information that will be requested at the security checkpoint in Long Island at Main Campus Road:

For Access:

  • Date and time of sign-in
  • Name
  • Phone number
  • Email
  • Department, as applicable
  • Buildings and rooms to be used on visit

Upon Leaving:

  • Date and time of sign-out

Thank you again for your patience as we implement this necessary protocol.

Hank Foley, Ph.D.
President, New York Institute of Technology


A Message from Our Chief Medical Officer:
Novel Coronavirus Update #11

March 12, 2020

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Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff:

New York Institute of Technology administration continues to monitor, meet, and plan for the COVID-19 situation on a daily basis. To date, we have not been informed of any COVID-19 cases on campus, and no faculty member, staff, or student has tested positive for the virus. We would expect to be contacted by local public health authorities should this occur.

We anticipate that the number of cases to increase as the nation's capacity to provide the test increases. Currently, this test cannot be given as a routine screening test. An individual must meet the criteria of being at high risk for contracting the disease (e.g. in contact with an actual case and having a fever/cough/shortness of breath) before the test will be approved. Simply having flu-like symptoms alone will not qualify for obtaining the COVID-19 test. This a rapidly evolving situation that changes on a daily basis, so please continue to follow the websites below to remain informed:



For those who are traveling:

We must all remain vigilant to assure that any possible transmission is limited. Therefore, as the CDC recommends, "Employees who have symptoms of acute respiratory illness are recommended to stay home and not come to work until they are free of fever (100.4° F [37.8° C] or greater using an oral thermometer), signs of a fever, and any other symptoms for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing or other symptom-altering medicines (e.g. cough suppressants). Employees should notify their supervisor and stay home if they are sick."

Given that it is likely that we will eventually have more transmission within the U.S., we should all develop better personal hygiene habits. Everyone should continue to follow general precautions to avoid becoming infected or spreading the virus by:

  • Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Avoiding travelling and contact with others if you are sick.

The CDC also recommends avoiding close contact with people who are sick and putting distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick (older adults and people who have severe underlying chronic medical conditions). Where possible, follow the practice of social distancing (remaining out of congregate settings, avoiding mass gatherings, and maintaining distance of approximately six feet or two meters from others). Additional CDC guidelines for high-risk individuals can be found here.

Additional Resources

In addition to your local resources, the Academic Health Center is available to answer questions and assist those who are not feeling well. We can be reached at 516.686.1300.

It is also understandable that members of our New York Tech community may have concerns about a new and unfamiliar illness. If you are feeling anxious or uneasy, please reach out to Counseling and Wellness Services at our campuses in Long Island (516.686.7683) or New York City (212.261.1773) to talk or make an appointment, or stop by during the drop-in hours indicated on the Counseling and Wellness Services web page.

Sincerely

Brian L. Harper M.D., M.P.H.
Chief Medical Officer, NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine


A Message from President Foley:
Campus Updates, March 10

March 10, 2020

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Dear Students:

Yesterday, we wrote to you regarding plans for the suspension of in-person classes, effective March 10. I wanted to follow up with some details and clarifications regarding our plans:

Before Spring Break (Wednesday, March 11 - Friday, March 13): All in-person classes at our Long Island and New York City campuses will be suspended. Existing online classes will continue as scheduled. Our New York campuses will be open and student employees are expected to report for work. Food services will be open from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

After Spring Break: Beginning Monday, March 23, most suspended, in-person classes will resume in remote learning environments (such as online or video-conference classes). Your instructors will be in contact with you regarding additional details, so please check your emails throughout this week and next.

We will be providing additional information on academic resources in the coming days. Thank you for your patience as we continue to carefully follow guidelines provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and city and state health departments. We have also canceled or postponed major institutional events through the end of this month. And, in an abundance of caution, New York Tech has canceled all study abroad trips through August 30, 2020.

Thank you all for your patience and understanding. Please find additional updates at nyit.edu/covid for additional updates.

Regards,

Hank Foley, Ph.D.
President, New York Institute of Technology




A Message from President Foley:
Campus Updates #2, March 10

Dear Faculty and Staff:

Following the closure of campus today for a thorough cleaning and disinfecting, we will be open to all on Wednesday, March 11. All employees (including student employees) are expected to report to work.

In addition, we wrote to you regarding the suspension of in-person classes, effective March 10. I wanted to follow up with some additional details and clarifications regarding our plans for the rest of this week (prior to Spring Recess) and after:

Wednesday, March 11 - Friday, March 13: All in-person classes at our Long Island and New York City campuses will be suspended. Existing online classes will continue as scheduled. Our New York campuses will be open for faculty and staff; food services will be open from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Thursday, March 19 - Fridau, March 20: Spring Recess (as scheduled).

After Spring Break: Beginning Monday, March 23, most suspended in-person classes will resume in remote learning environments (such as online or video-conferencing classes), and we've let students know their faculty will reach out to them with details. We expect both campuses to be open to faculty and staff.

Thank you all for your patience and understanding. Please visit nyit.edu/covid for additional updates.

Regards,

Hank Foley, Ph.D.
President, New York Institute of Technology


A Message from President Foley:
Campus Closure: Tuesday, March 10

March 10, 2020

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To members of the New York Tech Community:

I am writing to notify you that in an abundance of caution, New York Institute of Technology will close our Long Island and New York City campuses all day on Tuesday, March 10, 2020 to conduct a thorough cleaning and disinfecting of all our spaces.

Thank you for your understanding and attention as we seek to ensure the safety and well-being of our entire community. We will continue to provide frequent updates as we have more information and recommendations, all of which can be found at nyit.edu/covid.

Regards,

Hank Foley, Ph.D.
President, New York Institute of Technology


A Message from Provost Gonzales:
Suspension of in-person classes on New York Campuses, effective March 10

March 10, 2020

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With the health and safety of everyone at New York Institute of Technology as our first priority, we are proactively moving to suspend all in-person classes for our New York City and Long Island campuses, effective Tuesday, March 10, 2020. Going forward, all classes on these two campuses will be taught online, via videoconferencing, or with some combination of digital techniques until further notice. Additional details include:

  • If you are in an online class, that class will continue with no changes except: if there are on-campus meetings that are a part of the online course, they will not be held. Your instructor will inform you about changes in the schedule or syllabus.
  • If you are in a blended/hybrid or face-to-face class or a class in a DL classroom (any class where you are physically in the same room with other students), those classes will be suspended, effective Tuesday, March 10, 2020.
  • We will provide instructors with details about remote teaching in short notice.
  • Beginning with the start of the day on Monday, March 23, 2020, we expect suspended in-person classes will resume as online classes or videoconference classes. Instructors will be in contact with students between March 10 and 22 with details about how the class will be held. We ask everyone to please monitor their NYIT email during this time for important information.
  • We will provide more details about any missed classes and makeup times.
  • All student activities will be suspended on Tuesday, March 10 and remain suspended until further notice.
  • Updates on the athletic program will be forthcoming.

These measures are in force until further notice. It is our goal to restore normal campus operations as soon as possible; however, the health and safety of our community is paramount. We will be working with local health authorities to determine when we can return to face-to-face teaching. We will also keep the lines of communication open to let you know about commencement and other upcoming campus activities.

New York Tech is doing its part in helping to prevent the spread of COVID-19. We recognize the declaration of a state of emergency by Governor Cuomo and the interim guidance for higher education from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We are asking everyone at New York Tech to do their part in helping to keep our community safe.

New York Tech realizes that this disruption in the semester is stressful on everyone. We thank you, in advance, for demonstrating that resiliency and can-do-it attitude of the makers, doers, and innovators at New York Institute of Technology.

Regards,

Junius Gonzales, M.D., M.B.A.
Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs


A Message from Our Chief Medical Officer:
Novel Coronavirus Update #10

March 6, 2020

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Dear Students:

As of March 6, 2020, COVID-19 has caused 100,347 confirmed infections worldwide and 3,408 confirmed deaths. This is a case fatality rate of approximately 3.4%, which is subject to change as time progresses. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 164 cases have been found in patients in the U.S. There are 48 cases in Canada.

There are now four reported cases in New York City and one reported case in Nassau County, Long Island. The latter case is presumed to be a "community acquired" case, which indicates that it is not associated with travel to a high-risk area. The New York State Health Department's Wadsworth Laboratory now has the capacity to test for the causative agent of COVID-19, SARS COV-2, so it is likely that we will begin to see an increase in reported cases.

Videos, FAQs and More

New York Tech is closely monitoring the situation. Although, to date, there have been no documented reported cases within our institution, COVID-19 is the topic of daily meetings held by senior administrators and our medical professionals to assess available information.

General information/updates, new instructional videos, and self-care tips can be found at nyit.edu/covid. In addition, more detailed information/FAQs about travel, what to do in specific scenarios, and additional self-care instructions can be found via my.nyit.edu (log-in required). Recent announcements on this page include notice that all New York Tech-led study abroad through August 31, 2020 has been canceled.

In the meantime, our facilities team has increased the cleaning frequency of all our facilities, has more than doubled the number of hand sanitizers on every floor throughout all campus buildings, and is adding signage across our campuses to remind us all to wash our hands thoroughly and often. We've also ensured that the disinfectant we are using is effective against coronaviruses and emerging viral pathogens.

Additional Resources

In addition to your local resources, the Academic Health Center is available to answer questions and assist those who are not feeling well. We can be reached at 516.686.1300.

It is also understandable that members of our New York Tech community may have concerns about a new and unfamiliar illness. If you are feeling anxious or uneasy, please reach out to Counseling and Wellness Services at our campuses in Long Island (516.686.7683) or New York City (212.261.1773) to talk or make an appointment, or stop by during the drop-in hours indicated on the Counseling and Wellness Services web page.

Sincerely

Brian L. Harper M.D., M.P.H.
Chief Medical Officer, NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine


A Message from President Foley

March 4, 2020

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To the New York Tech Community:

New York Institute of Technology is committed to keeping everybody informed regarding any news that may impact our community. As you may have heard, a Yeshiva University student has recently tested positive for the 2019 Novel Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19). As a precaution, they have closed their Wilf campus in Washington Heights today. We are following their progress closely and we wish them the very best of success in this endeavor. In light of this, I want to assure you that there have been no reports of any New York Tech student, faculty, or staff member being infected with COVID-19. New York Institute of Technology continues to monitor the Coronavirus situation and will be prepared to take immediate action should an outbreak occur among our community.

In addition, our facilities team is immediately increasing the number of hand sanitizers on every floor throughout all campus buildings. New signage is being installed in all bathrooms to remind us all to wash our hands thoroughly and often. To further protect students and faculty, we are also canceling study abroad trips for the spring 2020 semester.

Furthermore, we are creating a video featuring Dr. Brian Harper, associate professor and chief medical officer, to inform you about COVID-19, how it spreads, and ways to protect yourself. We will share this video with the entire community once it is complete later this week, as well as additional web resources on NYIT.edu that will contain more information about the Coronavirus.

The health and safety of the New York Tech community is always our top priority. We will continue to update all students, faculty, and staff on the latest COVID-19 developments.

Sincerely,

Hank Foley, Ph.D.
President, New York Institute of Technology


A Message from Our Chief Medical Officer:
Novel Coronavirus Update #9

March 2, 2020

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Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff:

New York Institute of Technology continues to closely monitor reports on COVID 19 from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The safety and well-being of the New York Tech community is our No. 1 priority, and our team of administrators and health professionals are meeting daily to ensure that the university is informed and prepared for any circumstances.

The following is an update on CDC information as well as precautions to take if you are feeling ill or to avoid the spread infection:

Update

As of March 2, 2020, COVID 19 has caused 89,198 confirmed infections worldwide and 3,048 confirmed deaths. This is a case fatality rate of approximately 3.4%, which is subject to change as time progresses.

Of these cases, 89 have been found in patients in the U.S. as a result of the return of citizens who were infected overseas, and 24 cases have been reported in Canada. In the U.S., there have been two deaths in the state of Washington, and there is now one reported case in New York City. This is reportedly an individual who returned from Iran, which is considered a high-risk area. Based on reports worldwide, it appears that the elderly and those with chronic diseases are more likely to become ill from this disease. The CDC’s current risk assessment is as follows:

  • For the general American public, who are unlikely to be exposed to this virus at this time, the immediate health risk from COVID-19 is considered low.
  • People in communities where ongoing community spread with the virus that causes COVID-19 has been reported are at elevated though still relatively low risk of exposure.
  • Health care workers caring for patients with COVID-19 are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Those in close contact with persons with COVID-19 also are at elevated risk of exposure.
  • Travelers returning from affected international locations where community spread is occurring also are at elevated risk of exposure.

If you have been to any high-risk area as determined by the CDC or have been in close contact with someone who has been infected and you have symptoms such as cough, fever, shortness of breath, it is recommended that you contact the nearest emergency room and go for an evaluation.

Precautions

We must all remain vigilant to assure that any possible transmission is limited. Therefore, as the CDC recommends, “Employees who have symptoms of acute respiratory illness are recommended to stay home and not come to work until they are free of fever (100.4° F [37.8° C] or greater using an oral thermometer), signs of a fever, and any other symptoms for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing or other symptom-altering medicines (e.g. cough suppressants). Employees should notify their supervisor and stay home if they are sick.” Other symptoms include cough, sneezing, and shortness of breath.

These recommendations apply to all students as well: Students with a fever should notify their instructors via phone, email, or text messages that they are not feeling well and determine how the material missed in a class can be made up or substituted.

Given that it is likely that we will eventually have more transmission within the U.S., we should all develop better personal hygiene habits. Everyone should continue to follow general precautions to avoid becoming infected or spreading the virus include by:

  1. Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  2. Using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  3. Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  4. Avoiding travelling and contact with others if you are sick.

This video describes good handwashing technique.

Resources

In addition to your local resources, the physicians and staff at the Academic Health Centers are available to answer questions and assist those who are not feeling well. We can be reached at 516.686.1300.

It is also understandable that members of our New York Tech community may have concerns about a new and unfamiliar illness. If you are feeling anxious or uneasy, please reach out to Counseling and Wellness Services at our campuses in Long Island (516.686.7683) or New York City (212.261.1773) to talk or make an appointment, or stop by during the drop-in hours indicated on the Counseling and Wellness Services web page.

Sincerely,

Brian L. Harper M.D., M.P.H.
Chief Medical Officer, NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine


A Message from Our Chief Medical Officer:
Novel Coronavirus Update #8

February 27, 2020

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Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff:

As of February 26, 2020, COVID 19 has caused 81,280 confirmed infections worldwide and 2,770 confirmed deaths. This is a case fatality rate of approximately 3%, which is subject to change. Of the total cases of infection, 57 are patients in the U.S. (as a result of the return of citizens who were infected overseas) and 11 were cases in Canada. Despite increased media coverage and concern surrounding COVID 19's impact on global and local markets in the past week, there are still no documented cases in New York City or New York State. The U.S. policy still remains the same.

The potential public health threat posed by COVID-19 is high, both globally and to the United States. Nonetheless, there has been no change by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CD), which still concludes, "For the general American public, who are unlikely to be exposed to this virus, the immediate health risk from COVID 19 is considered low."

However, we must all remain vigilant to assure that possible transmission is limited. As it is likely there will be more transmission within the U.S., we have a window of opportunity to develop better personal hygiene habits. Therefore:

  1. If you have been to Wuhan City, China or have been in close contact with someone who has been infected and you have symptoms such as cough, fever, or shortness of breath, it is recommended that you contact the nearest emergency room and go for an evaluation.
  2. Everyone should continue to follow general precautions to avoid becoming infected or spreading this (or any other) virus by:
    1. Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
    2. Using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
    3. Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
    4. Avoiding travelling and contact with others if you are sick.

These actions will not only help prevent the spread of COVID 19, but also the spread of the influenza virus, which is still considered to be a greater threat of sickness and death in the U.S. The CDC estimates that so far this season there have been at least 29 million flu illnesses, 280,000 hospitalizations and 16,000 deaths from flu. Hospitalization rates among children and young adults are higher than in the past and 105 influenza-associated deaths in children have been reported so far this season. Therefore, it is still recommended that you get a flu vaccine this year.

In addition to your local resources, the physicians and staff at the Academic Health Centers are available to answer questions and assist those who are not feeling well. We can be reached at 516.686.1300.

It is also understandable that members of our New York Tech community may have concerns about a new and unfamiliar illness. If you are feeling anxious or uneasy, please reach out to Counseling and Wellness Services at our campuses in Long Island (516.686.7683) or New York City (212.261.1773) to talk or make an appointment, or stop by during the drop-in hours indicated on the Counseling and Wellness Services web page.

Sincerely,

Brian L. Harper M.D., M.P.H.
Chief Medical Officer, NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine


A Message from Our Chief Medical Officer:
Novel Coronavirus Update #7

February 20, 2020

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Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff:

As of February 19, 2020, the Novel Coronavirus is now officially called COVID 19 by the World Health Organization, It has caused 75,280 confirmed infections worldwide and 2,014 confirmed deaths. This is a case fatality rate of approximately 2.7%, which is subject to change as time progresses. For comparison, the Ebola virus and the virus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) each had a case fatality rate of roughly 40%.

To date, 15 COVID 19 cases have been found in patients in the U.S. and eight in Canada. There are still no documented cases in New York City or New York State.

The U.S. policy remains the same:

  1. Any U.S. citizen returning to the U.S. who has been in Hubei Province in the previous 14 days will be subject to up to 14 days of mandatory quarantine to ensure they’re provided proper medical care and health screening.
  2. Any U.S. citizen returning to the U.S. who has been in the rest of mainland China within the previous 14 days will undergo proactive entry health screening at a select number of ports of entry and up to 14 days of monitored self-quarantine to ensure they have not contracted the virus and do not pose a public health risk.
  3. Foreign nationals, other than immediate family of U.S. citizens and permanent residents, who have traveled to China within the last 14 days will be denied entry into the U.S. for this time.
  4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) are continuing to identify and screen travelers who have recently been in China at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) and other airports in the U.S.

There has been no change by the CDC, which still concludes, “For the general American public, who are unlikely to be exposed to this virus, the immediate health risk from COVID 19 is considered low.” However, we must all remain vigilant to assure that any possible transmission is limited. Therefore:

  1. If you have been to Wuhan City, China or have been in close contact with someone who has been infected and you have symptoms such as cough, fever, or shortness of breath, it is recommended that you contact the nearest emergency room and go for an evaluation.
  2. Everyone should continue to follow general precautions to avoid becoming infected or spreading this (or any other) virus by:
    1. Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
    2. Using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
    3. Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
    4. Avoiding travelling and contact with others if you are sick.

These actions will not only help prevent the spread of COVID 19, but also the spread of the influenza virus, which is still considered to be a greater threat of sickness and death in the U.S.! The CDC estimates that so far this season there have been at least 22 million flu illnesses; 210,000 hospitalizations; and 12,000 deaths. Hospitalization rates among children and young adults are higher than in the past, and 78 influenza-associated deaths in children have been reported so far this year. Therefore, it is still recommended that you get a flu vaccine this year.

Available Resources

In addition to your local resources, the physicians and staff at the Academic Health Centers are available to answer questions and assist those who are not feeling well. We can be reached at 516.686.1300.

It is also understandable that members of our New York Tech community may have concerns about a new and unfamiliar illness. If you are feeling anxious or uneasy, please reach out to Counseling and Wellness Services at our campuses in Long Island (516.686.7683) or New York City (212.261.1773) to talk or make an appointment, or stop by during the drop-in hours indicated on the Counseling and Wellness Services web page.

Sincerely,

Brian L. Harper M.D., M.P.H.
Chief Medical Officer, NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine


A Message from Our Chief Medical Officer:
Novel Coronavirus Update #6

February 14, 2020

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Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff:

As of February 13, 2020, the Novel Coronavirus (or 2019-nCoV) has now caused 60,364 confirmed infections worldwide and 1,370 confirmed deaths (case fatality rate of 2.2%). Fifteen of these cases have been found in patients in the U.S. and seven in Canada. There are still no documented cases in New York City or New York State; no results are currently pending. Of the 135 people who tested positive on the quarantined cruise ship The Diamond Princess, 20 are American.

The U.S. policy still remains the same:

  1. Any U.S. citizen returning to the U.S. who has been in Hubei Province in the previous 14 days will be subject to up to 14 days of mandatory quarantine, to ensure they’re provided proper medical care and health screening.
  2. Any U.S. citizen returning to the U.S. who has been in the rest of mainland China within the previous 14 days will undergo proactive entry health screening at a select number of ports of entry and up to 14 days of monitored self-quarantine to ensure they have not contracted the virus and do not pose a public health risk.
  3. Foreign nationals, other than immediate family of U.S. citizens and permanent residents, who have traveled to China within the last 14 days will be denied entry into the U.S. for this time.
  4. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) are continuing to identify and screen travelers who have recently been in China at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) and other airports in the U.S.

Precautions

There has been no change by the CDC that still concludes: “For the general American public, who are unlikely to be exposed to this virus, the immediate health risk from 2019-nCoV is considered low.” However, we must all remain vigilant to assure that any possible transmission is limited. Therefore:

  1. If you have been to Wuhan City, China or have been in close contact with someone who has been infected and you have symptoms such as cough, fever, or shortness of breath, it is recommended that you contact the nearest Emergency Room and go for an evaluation.
  2. Everyone should continue to follow general precautions to avoid becoming infected or spreading the virus, including:
    1. Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
    2. Using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
    3. Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
    4. Avoiding travelling and contact with others if you are sick.

Influenza Information

These actions will not only help prevent the spread of the 2019-nCoV, but also the spread of the influenza virus, which is still considered to be a greater threat of sickness and death in the U.S.! The CDC estimates that so far this season there have been at least 22 million flu illnesses, 210,000 hospitalizations, and 12,000 deaths. Hospitalization rates among children and young adults are higher than in the past, and 78 influenza-associated deaths in children have been reported so far this year. Therefore, it is still recommended that you get a flu vaccine this year.

Available Resources

In addition to your local resources, the physicians and staff at the Academic Health Centers are available to answer questions and assist those who are not feeling well. We can be reached at 516.686.1300.

It is also understandable that members of our New York Tech community may have concerns about a new and unfamiliar illness. If you are feeling anxious or uneasy, please reach out to Counseling and Wellness Services at our campuses in Long Island (516.686.7683) or New York City (212.261.1773) to talk or make an appointment, or stop by during the drop-in hours indicated on the Counseling and Wellness Services web page.

Sincerely,

Brian L. Harper M.D., M.P.H.
Chief Medical Officer, NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine


A Message from Our Chief Medical Officer:
Novel Coronavirus Update #5

February 11, 2020

Read More

Dear Students, Faculty, and Staff:

As of February 10, 2020, the Novel Coronavirus (or 2019-nCoV) has now caused 40,574 confirmed infections worldwide and 910 confirmed deaths (case fatality rate of 2%). Twelve of these cases have been found in patients in the U.S. and seven in Canada. There are still no documented cases in New York City or New York State, while the results are still pending for one patient in New York City who has met the criteria for further testing of this new virus by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The other five New York City resident test results have come back negative (no disease). Of the 135 people who tested positive on the quarantined cruise ship, The Diamond Princess, 20 are Americans.

The U.S. policy still remains the same:

  1. Any U.S. citizen returning to the U.S. who has been in Hubei Province in the previous 14 days will be subject to up to 14 days of mandatory quarantine, to ensure they’re provided proper medical care and health screening.
  2. Any U.S. citizen returning to the U.S. who has been in the rest of mainland China within the previous 14 days will undergo proactive entry health screening at a select number of ports of entry and up to 14 days of monitored self-quarantine to ensure they have not contracted the virus and do not pose a public health risk.
  3. Foreign nationals, other than immediate family of U.S. citizens and permanent residents, who have traveled to China within the last 14 days will be denied entry into the U.S. for this time.
  4. The CDC and Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) are continuing to identify and screen travelers who have recently been in China at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) and other airports in the U.S.

There has been no change by the CDC, which still concludes: “For the general American public, who are unlikely to be exposed to this virus, the immediate health risk from 2019-nCoV is considered low.” However, we must all remain vigilant to assure that any possible transmission is limited. Therefore:

  1. If you have been to Wuhan City, China or have been in close contact with someone who has been infected and you have symptoms such as cough, fever, shortness of breath, it is recommended that you contact the nearest Emergency Room and go for an evaluation.
  2. Everyone should continue to follow general precautions to avoid becoming infected or spreading the virus include by:
    1. Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
    2. Using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
    3. Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
    4. Avoiding travelling and contact with others if you are sick.
  3. These actions will not only help prevent the spread of the 2019-nCoV, but also the spread of the influenza virus which is still considered to be a greater threat of sickness and death in the U.S.!

In addition to your local resources, the physicians and staff at the Academic Health Centers are available to answer questions and assist those who are not feeling well. We can be reached at 516.686.1300.

It is also understandable that members of our New York Tech community may have concerns about a new and unfamiliar illness. If you are feeling anxious or uneasy, please reach out to Counseling and Wellness Services at our campuses in Long Island (516.686.7683) or New York City (212.261.1773) to talk or make an appointment, or stop by during the drop-in hours indicated on the Counseling and Wellness Services web page.

Sincerely,

Brian L. Harper M.D., M.P.H.
Chief Medical Officer, NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine



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