Health Sciences, B.S.
Curriculum

Discovery Core

Foundations Credits:
FCWR 101 Writing I: Foundations of College Composition1 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: WRIT 100 or Writing Placement Exam

A course introducing students to the fundamentals of college composition. Topics include writing process, rhetorical strategies, basics of critical reading and thinking, analytical writing, and argumentative writing. This course serves as a foundation to prepare students to succeed in other academic writing contexts. Coursework includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 151 Writing II: Foundations of Research Writing1 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: FCWR 101 or WRIT 101

Further development of the academic writing, critical thinking, and analytical reading skills taught in Writing I. An introduction to academic discourse in the four core seminar areas: literature, social sciences, behavioral sciences, and philosophy. Development of library skills leading to a documented research paper.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSP 105 Foundations of Speech Communication 3
Study of the fundamentals of verbal communication including public speaking, interpersonal communication, and small group interaction. Training in methods of obtaining and organizing materials and ideas for effective verbal communication.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCIQ 101 Foundations of Inquiry 3
This course introduces you to the fundamentals of critical thinking. Topics include an overview of the research methods in various academic disciplines, reasoning, constructing an argument, and evaluating information. This course serves as a foundation for your continued development of critical thinking skills in other core classes, your major program coursework, and your personal and professional life.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 302 Communication for Healthcare Careers 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Building on courses taken in their majors, students will learn and apply concepts of effective written and oral expression appropriate for careers in the health and biology professions. In addition to closely examining a variety of texts across the discipline, students will develop public speaking skills while also learning to collaborate on grant proposals, literature reviews, pamphlets and posters, and a research paper. Topics covered include the rhetoric of writing in the health professions, ethics, images in the sciences, grant- and abstract writing, and researching and writing publishable manuscripts. Course work includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 15 Credits
 
Seminars Credits:
ICLT 3XX Literature choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICPH 3XX Philosophy choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICSS 3XX Social Science choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICBS 309 Anthropological Approaches to Health Seminar 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This seminar course in health and anthropology will examine this subfield within the diachronic context of the theoretical framework from functionalism to the recent more holistic multidisciplinary perspectives of cultural, ecological, and bio-cultural approaches. Moreover, individual health issues such as infectious epidemics, nutrition, stress, etc. will be examined from a cross-cultural as well as from a biological perspective. Attention will be given to cultural beliefs and customs as they interact in the adaptive relationship between disease and the physical environment. We shall also be concerned with the dynamic interplay between the healers, the healing situation (traditional and non-traditional), and the clients as they participate in the healing process.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 12 Credits
 
Math Requirement (select one of the following) Credits:
MATH 141 Precalculus 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 100 or MATH 101 or Math Placement Exam

A study of relations and functions; inequalities; complex numbers; quadratic equations; linear systems of equations; higher degree equations; trigonometric functions; identities; functions of composite angles; graphs of the trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; and binomial theorem. Note: A graphing calculator is used throughout the course.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
MATH 170 Calculus I 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 141 or TMAT 155 or Math Placement Exam

Study of lines and circles. Functions, limits, derivatives of algebraic functions, introduction to derivatives of trigonometric functions. Application of derivatives to physics problems, related rates, maximum-minimum word problems and curve sketching. Introduction to indefinite integrals. The conic sections.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
    Total: 4 Credits
 
Science Requirement Credits:
BIOL 110 General Biology I 4
The similarity in living things is demonstrated by a molecular and cellular approach to biology. After introductory biochemistry, the cell as the basic unit of life is studied structurally and metabolically. Life functions are examined from a cellular and from a vertebrate-organismic viewpoint. The central theme is the flow of energy between the biosphere and the ecosphere. The scientific method and hypothesis-testing are stressed as a means of investigation and forming conclusions. Collaborative laboratory assignments will include microscopic studies of the cell, its functions, and the dissection of a fetal pig.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 4 Credits
 

Major Requirements

Health Sciences Requirement Credits:
HSCI 190 Community Health Implications 3
This course will introduce the student to basic community health, health case systems and community health concerns. Topics covered include epidemiology, health promotion and disease prevention, chronic disease and societal implications for chronic disease, health care settings and introduction to healthcare teams. The format will be mostly lecture and class discussion.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 195 Professional and Cultural Issues 3
This course is designed to introduce the student to the various employment opportunities and career preparation required in the healthcare professions. The ethical, legal, cultural and professional considerations involved in health occupations will be explored. Local healthcare professionals will be invited to share their career choices in order to assist the student in making informed decisions regarding their future career choices.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 210 Medical Terminology 2
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 210

This course is designed to meet the needs of students in health-related programs and to provide them with a working knowledge of medical vocabulary. The course includes disease names and their meanings, medical word structure, basic medical/surgica1 terms and procedures, anatomical designations for body parts and organs, and commonly used medical abbreviations.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-0-2
HSCI 410 Senior Practicum I 4
The purpose of the capstone experience is to introduce the student, via an internship program, to an area of interest. Students will attend an offsite location to gain experiential instruction in health care administration and/or partake in a health care experience. Settings will include community health centers, hospital-based administrative offices, and county health departments. The student will gain practical knowledge while engaged in the business environment of the offsite location. A reflective journal and an experiential log are required elements, as is the submission of a culminating report on practical experiences.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-4
HSCI 415 Senior Practicum II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: HSCI 410

This course builds upon the knowledge gained in the first capstone experience. Students are now expected to complete a community service project and/or work with a mentor to develop a new initiative in their area of interest. A portfolio of the experience as well as presentation of the project/initiative will provide the framework for a formal review and critique of the project.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-4
HSCI 420 Biomedical Ethics 3
The course will examine and analyze moral dilemmas created by recent advances in medical technology. The course will include selections from the literature, ethics, values, and philosophy as related to the delivery of health care. Medical-legal issues will be addressed with particular reference to liability and confidentiality. Issues related to euthanasia, the right to die, abortion, behavior modification, allocation of scarce medical resources, in vitro fertilization, genetic screening and engineering, and human experimentation will also be addressed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 425 Health Information Management 3
This course will cover the myriad of information delivery systems and technologies currently available to manage the increasing volume of health information. In addition to discussion of management systems, students will be introduced to issues of confidentiality, HIPPA regulations, and policies and procedures for information acquisition and integration. Information and technology required for building community health programs as well as management of smaller health care settings will be introduced and discussed. This includes the ethics, benefits and problems associated with electronic patient databases.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 430 Health Care Payment Systems 3
Through extensive lecture and discussion, this course will emphasize the complex nature of health care payment systems and differing options for payment currently in place. Discussions of health care settings and their implications for payment options will be introduced, as well as revenue implications for management decisions. This course will also introduce the impact of governmental regulations on the delivery of health care as it relates to payment.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
NTSI 201 Introduction to Clinical Nutrition 3
This course is intended to introduce students to nutrition practice. Topics include Introduction to Nutrients, Digestion. Absorption and Metabolism of Nutrients, Life Cycle Nutrition, Introduction to Diet Therapy and Nutrition Support Practices. Students develop knowledge and skill in clinical and dietary assessment methodologies and develop facility with medical terminology and practices. Students construct dietary intervention protocols using whole foods to meet the dietary prescription and discuss implementation of these protocols in diverse cultural groups. Attention will be placed on development of dietary practices to prevent and/or ameliorate disease.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 28 Credits
 
Health Sciences Elective (choose one) Credits:
HSCI 320 Complementary and Alternative Medicine 3
This course examines the principles, practices, use and outcomes of complementary therapies and alternative healing. It provides an overview of the field, reviews selected systems of alternative healing, and focuses on specific healing modalities that are widely used in the general population. Alternative therapies will be viewed as complementary to the existing medical system. Students will learn to use evidence based criteria to evaluate the risks and benefits of selected complementary therapies.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 330 Exercise Physiology 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 150 or BIOL 310

Understanding the physiology of the exercising human is essential to the successful health and wellness professional. The purpose of this course is to develop competencies within the student that are related to fitness evaluation, exercise and activity prescription, and training program development for individuals or for groups with age, sex, and culture as important modifying factors. Beginning with the basic physiological concepts of energy metabolism, pulmonary, cardiovascular and muscular function, the student examines in depth the responses of individuals to the stress of exercise, training, and detraining. These physiological principles formulate the basis for the development of sound programs of exercise, training, and wellness programs.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 340 Health and Aging 3
This course takes an interprofessional approach to exploring and examining aspects of health and aging from the integration of bio-medical and psychosocial perspectives. Attention will be paid to the demographic and ethnic shifts, both nationally and globally, that are bringing about the aging "tsunami", the myths, misconceptions, and stereotypes associated with older adults, and the major influences on health of older adults including: chronic/acute illnesses, mental health, medication use, physical activity and nutrition, sexuality, health promotion, medical and long term care, death and dying, the role of the family, and health policy and advocacy issues. This course will take a "whole person" approach and focus on cultural, economic, and cohort differences.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 400 Seminar 3
This seminar explores the history of health care and an analysis and synthesis of contemporary national and global health care issues, particularly health care issues being debated in the public arena. Students are expected to identify health care topics and to write and present papers in the class.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 435 Health and Social Policy 3
This course addresses present and prospective national health care policy. A focus will be placed on various current health care issues, including high and rising costs, differences in access to medical service, and trade-offs between cost and quality. The course will include study and discussion of Medicare, Medicaid, medical malpractice, profit versus not-only-for-profit producers of care, and alternative delivery systems.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 480 Health Education and Promotion 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: HSCI 190, HSCI 195, and NTSI 201 or BIOL 260

This course aims to provide students with the skills to develop theoretically-informed and evidence-based community health initiatives. Students will explore innovative, meaningful and effective teaching and learning approaches and materials used in health education and social marketing. Also covered is the measurement of population health, sources of data, methods for assessing population health improvements and other skills that reflect the responsibilities and competencies of the entry-level certified health educator specialist (CHES). Over the course of the semester, students work in teams on developing and evaluating their own culturally-competent health initiative, each of which is targeted at a particular population with a specific health need. After completing this course students will be equipped with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to raise people's health awareness, as a well as the tools needed to teach people how to reduce their risk of disease and promote health and wellness.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-4
NTSI 360 Lifestyle and Weight Management 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: NTSI 201 or BIOL 103 or BIOL 260

This course includes epidemiologic trends in weight management, physiological and environmental influences on weight and the effect of weight on chronic disease. Various approaches to weight management are explored with an emphasis on lifestyle modification for improving health across the lifespan. Fad diets, supplements, drug regimens and surgical intervention are reviewed. The prevention, early detection, and treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder are investigated.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3–4 Credits
 
Management Credits:
MGMT 102 Principles of Management 3
A study of organizations and of the activities of a manager in an organization. The course follows a functional approach, analyzing such management concepts as organizing decentralization, use of staff, human relations, conflict, decision-making, planning , supervision, communication, and financial and production control systems such as budgeting and PERT.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3 Credits
 
Behavioral Science Credits:
PSYC 101 Introductory Psychology 3
An introduction to selected concepts, methods, and vocabulary of psychology. Focus of study will be on the individual and the conditions that influence behavior. Topics that will be covered include: growth and development, learning and thinking, emotions and motivations, personality and assessment, mal-adjustment and mental health, groups and social interaction, and social influence and society.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSYC 210 Statistical Analysis 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 115 or MATH 125 or MATH 140 or MATH 141 or MATH 160 or MATH 161 or MATH 170 or MATH 180 or TMAT 135 or TMAT 155

This course covers descriptive and inferential statistics, frequency distributions, percentile rank, measure of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression and tests of significance. Using computer software, students will directly apply these statistics to specific problems common to the behavioral sciences.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-4
PSYC 310 Abnormal Psychology 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSYC 101

A study of mental health and abnormal behavior. The topics covered include: definitions of mental health and mental illness; problems of adjustment; the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. Case studies supplement and illustrate the theoretical parts of the course material.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 10 Credits
 
Biology Credits:
BIOL 150 General Biology II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 110

The variety of living things is demonstrated by a study of representative plants and animals, emphasizing the viewpoints of taxonomy, phylogeny, morphology, and physiology. The continuity of life is demonstrated through studies in reproduction, genetics, and organic evolution. Scientific inquiry and critical thinking strategies are emphasized. Collaborative laboratory assignments include the dissection and study of fixed and living specimens representing the whole range of life.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 210 Human Gross Anatomy 4
A structural study of the human body. Topics include cells and tissue, skeleton, articulation, muscles, body systems, special organs, and surface anatomy.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 235 Microbiology 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 150 except BS Health & Wellness and BS Nursing

A first course in microbiology which treats the anatomy, physiology, and relationships of bacteria, fungi, viruses, Rickettsiae, and protozoa. Included are discussions of the role of microorganisms in the food industry, in the environment, and in health.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 310 Human Physiology 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 210 and one course in this group: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110. Life Sciences Osteopathy: One course in this group: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110.

An introductory course in the functions and mechanisms of the human body. Laboratory exercises include the detection and measurement of these functions using modern methods.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 16 Credits
 
Chemistry Credits:
CHEM 110 General Chemistry I 4
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 135 or TMAT 135, MATH 136 or TMAT 155, MATH 141, MATH 161, or MATH 170

An introduction to theoretical and inorganic chemistry. Studies include: types of matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, gas laws, and chemical calculations. Laboratory work illustrates common laboratory techniques as well as chemical principles.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
CHEM 150 General Chemistry II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 110

A continuation of CHEM 110. Topics to be covered include thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, ionic equilibria, oxidation-reduction reactions, and electrochemistry. Laboratory work illustrates the principles discussed in the lecture.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 150

This course includes the study of the stereochemistry and electronic structure of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, and the properties of their functional groups. Laboratory work consists of the determination of physical constants and the preparation of various organic compounds.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
—OR—
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
CHEM 215 Bio-Organic Chemistry 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110

The basic concepts of organic chemistry and biochemistry are covered. Topics include hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, alcohols, phenols and ethers, carbonyl compounds, amines, amides, carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins, nucleic acids and the relationship of these chemicals to metabolic pathways. This course does not satisfy the organic chemistry or biochemistry course requirements for other science majors.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 12 Credits
 
Physics Credits:
PHYS 140 Physics for Life Sciences 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 141 or MATH 160 or MATH 161 or MATH 170 or TMAT 155.

Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: PHYS 141.

A basic course designed to meet the needs of health professions majors. Topics covered include vectors, laws of motion, work, energy, momentum, heat and wave motion. Illustrations from the field of life sciences will be stressed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-3
PHYS 141 Physics I Laboratory 1
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: PHYS 140

Laboratory course illustrating principles taught in the introductory physics for life sciences course, PHYS 140.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 0-2-1
    Total: 4 Credits
 
General Electives Credits:
Consult with advisor on elective choices 12
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
 
Total Required Credits = 123–124