Exercise Science, B.S., Exercise Physiology Concentration
Curriculum

Discovery Core

Foundations Credits:
FCWR 101 Writing I: Foundations of College Composition1 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: WRIT 100 or Writing Placement Exam

A course introducing students to the fundamentals of college composition. Topics include writing process, rhetorical strategies, basics of critical reading and thinking, analytical writing, and argumentative writing. This course serves as a foundation to prepare students to succeed in other academic writing contexts. Coursework includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 151 Writing II: Foundations of Research Writing1 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: FCWR 101 or WRIT 101

Further development of the academic writing, critical thinking, and analytical reading skills taught in Writing I. An introduction to academic discourse in the four core seminar areas: literature, social sciences, behavioral sciences, and philosophy. Development of library skills leading to a documented research paper.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSP 105 Foundations of Speech Communication 3
Study of the fundamentals of verbal communication including public speaking, interpersonal communication, and small group interaction. Training in methods of obtaining and organizing materials and ideas for effective verbal communication.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSC 101 Foundations of Scientific Process 3
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the big ideas of different scientific disciplines, and is grounded in the scientific process. The course focuses on interdisciplinary aspects, the scientific process, and it is writing intensive, interactive and relevant.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCIQ 101 Foundations of Inquiry 3
This course introduces you to the fundamentals of critical thinking. Topics include an overview of the research methods in various academic disciplines, reasoning, constructing an argument, and evaluating information. This course serves as a foundation for your continued development of critical thinking skills in other core classes, your major program coursework, and your personal and professional life.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 302 Communication for Healthcare Careers 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Building on courses taken in their majors, students will learn and apply concepts of effective written and oral expression appropriate for careers in the health and biology professions. In addition to closely examining a variety of texts across the discipline, students will develop public speaking skills while also learning to collaborate on grant proposals, literature reviews, pamphlets and posters, and a research paper. Topics covered include the rhetoric of writing in the health professions, ethics, images in the sciences, grant- and abstract writing, and researching and writing publishable manuscripts. Course work includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 18 Credits
[1] Non-native English speakers take FCWR 111 instead of FCWR 101, and FCWR 161 instead of FCWR 151.
 
Seminars Credits:
ICBS 309 Anthropological Approaches to Health Seminar 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This seminar course in health and anthropology will examine this subfield within the diachronic context of the theoretical framework from functionalism to the recent more holistic multidisciplinary perspectives of cultural, ecological, and bio-cultural approaches. Moreover, individual health issues such as infectious epidemics, nutrition, stress, etc. will be examined from a cross-cultural as well as from a biological perspective. Attention will be given to cultural beliefs and customs as they interact in the adaptive relationship between disease and the physical environment. We shall also be concerned with the dynamic interplay between the healers, the healing situation (traditional and non-traditional), and the clients as they participate in the healing process.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 3XX Literature Choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICPH 3XX Philosophy Choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICSS 3XX Social Science Choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
    Total: 12 Credits
 
Math Requirement (choose one) Credits:
MATH 135 Fundamentals of Precalculus I 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 100 or MATH 101 or Math Placement Exam

The first course in a two semester precalculus sequence. Review of algebra: exponents, factoring, fractions. Linear equations, ratio, proportions. Word problem application. Coordinate systems and graphs of functions: straight line, slope. Systems of linear equations and their applications. Complex numbers. Quadratic equations. Introduction to trigonometry. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 5-0-4

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
MATH 141 Precalculus 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 100 or MATH 101 or Math Placement Exam

A study of relations and functions; inequalities; complex numbers; quadratic equations; linear systems of equations; higher degree equations; trigonometric functions; identities; functions of composite angles; graphs of the trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; and binomial theorem. Note: A graphing calculator is used throughout the course.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
    Total: 4 Credits
 
Science Requirement (choose one) Credits:
CHEM 105 Applied Chemistry 3
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: TMAT 135 or MATH 141

For bachelor of technology majors. An introduction to basic chemical concepts and their application to industrial technology. Studies will include basic chemical concepts and calculations, the relationship of atomic structure and bonding to chemical and physical properties and the state of matter, and the role of thermal chemistry, thermodynamics and oxidation-reduction in determining the rates and extent of chemical reactions. The laboratory work will illustrate common laboratory techniques and the lecture materials presented.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-3-3
CHEM 110 General Chemistry I 4
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 135 or TMAT 135, MATH 136 or TMAT 155, MATH 141, MATH 161, or MATH 170

An introduction to theoretical and inorganic chemistry. Studies include: types of matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, gas laws, and chemical calculations. Laboratory work illustrates common laboratory techniques as well as chemical principles.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 3–4 Credits
 

Major Requirements

Behavioral Science Credits:
PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology 3
An introduction to selected concepts, methods, and vocabulary of psychology. Focus of study will be on the individual and the conditions that influence behavior. Topics that will be covered include: growth and development, learning and thinking, emotions and motivations, personality and assessment, mal-adjustment and mental health, groups and social interaction, and social influence and society.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3 Credits
 
Biology Credits:
BIOL 210 Human Gross Anatomy 4
A structural study of the human body. Topics include cells and tissue, skeleton, articulation, muscles, body systems, special organs, and surface anatomy.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 310 Human Physiology 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 210 and one course in this group: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110. Life Sciences Osteopathy: One course in this group: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110.

An introductory course in the functions and mechanisms of the human body. Laboratory exercises include the detection and measurement of these functions using modern methods.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 8 Credits
 
Management Credits:
MGMT 102 Principles of Management 3
A study of organizations and of the activities of a manager in an organization. The course follows a functional approach, analyzing such management concepts as organizing decentralization, use of staff, human relations, conflict, decision-making, planning , supervision, communication, and financial and production control systems such as budgeting and PERT.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3 Credits
 
Nutrition Science Credits:
NTSI 201 Introduction to Clinical Nutrition Practice 3
This course is intended to introduce students to nutrition practice. Topics include Introduction to Nutrients, Digestion. Absorption and Metabolism of Nutrients, Life Cycle Nutrition, Introduction to Diet Therapy and Nutrition Support Practices. Students develop knowledge and skill in clinical and dietary assessment methodologies and develop facility with medical terminology and practices. Students construct dietary intervention protocols using whole foods to meet the dietary prescription and discuss implementation of these protocols in diverse cultural groups. Attention will be placed on development of dietary practices to prevent and/or ameliorate disease.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
NTSI 360 Lifestyle and Weight Management 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: NTSI 201 or BIOL 103 or BIOL 260

This course includes epidemiologic trends in weight management, physiological and environmental influences on weight and the effect of weight on chronic disease. Various approaches to weight management are explored with an emphasis on lifestyle modification for improving health across the lifespan. Fad diets, supplements, drug regimens and surgical intervention are reviewed. The prevention, early detection, and treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder are investigated.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 6 Credits
 
Exercise Science Core Credits:
EXSC 100 Introduction to Kinesiology 3
Introduces topics associated with the professions of kinesiology. As a foundation course, students learn basic information related to physical activity, the bio-sciences, fitness and health, psycho-social domains of kinesiology and sport management. This course includes practical elements that incorporate the disciplines of athletic training, exercise science, physical education and sport management. Additionally, this course explains department academic programs and careers in the field of kinesiology.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 110 Foundations of Physical Activity 3
The aim of this course is to support the adoption of a physically active lifestyle conducive to health. The focus is on developing an understanding of the dynamic relationship between personal health and physical activity. Selected health issues are investigated in conjunction with active student participation in corresponding lifetime physical activities.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 150 Aerobic Conditioning 3
A complete aerobic fitness program that introduces various cardiovascular exercise programs to help students understand and experience the effect of aerobic conditioning. This course requires suitable attire and physical performance at the level and ability of each participant

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 160 Resistance and Flexibility Training 3
A study of the fundamental principles of resistance and flexibility training with applications for personal fitness and sports.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 200 Motion Analysis 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: EXSC 100 and BIOL 210 with a minimum grade of C

The aim of this course is to examine the process, techniques and tools available to: 1) examine an individual's movement, 2) determine optimal performance of the movement for that individual and, 3) develop and implement a plan that will ensure success along the path from initial to optimal performance.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 210 Measurement and Prescription 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: EXSC 100 with a minimum grade of C, MATH 135 or MATH 141 or PSYC 210

A study of the role of evaluation in exercise science, the organization and administration of a testing program, interventions, prescription and appropriate statistical methods used in a testing program.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 220 Disability and Diversity in Physical Activity 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: EXSC 100 with a minimum grade of C, BIOL 210 with a minimum grade of C

This course is a study of adapted exercise and physical activity. Specific topics include historical and legal aspects of various disabilities, individualized activity programming and assessment for individuals with exceptionalities, relationship between school/community/agencies providing special programs and services, and issues of cultural diversity and its effect on individual learning and behavior across physically related settings.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 230 Survey of Athletic Injuries 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: EXSC 100 with a minimum grade of C, BIOL 210 with a minimum grade of C

This course acquaints the student with the prevention, recognition, and basic management of athletic and exercise related injuries.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 300 Exercise Physiology** 3
Understanding the physiology of the exercising human is essential to the successful health and wellness professional. The purpose of this course is to develop competencies within the student that are related to fitness evaluation, exercise and activity prescription, and training program development for individuals or for groups with age, sex, and culture as important modifying factors. Beginning with the basic physiological concepts of energy metabolism, pulmonary, cardiovascular and muscular function, the student examines in depth the responses of individuals to the stress of exercise, training, and detraining. These physiological principles formulate the basis for the development of sound programs of exercise, training, and wellness programs.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 27 Credits
** EXSC 300 Exercise Physiology is cross-listed with HSCI 330.
 
Exercise Physiology Concentration (choose five) Credits:
EXSC 310 Essentials of Strength and Conditioning 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EXSC 300 with a minimum grade of C

Fundamental aspects of strength and conditioning are covered including program design and resistance, endurance and plyometric exercise techniques. This course also covers the basics of anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, nutrition, supplementation, and testing as it applies to resistance, speed, and power training. This course stresses both theory and application and is geared toward the preparation in attaining the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists (CSCS) and Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) certifications administered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 320 Biomechanics 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EXSC 300 with a minimum grade of C, BIOL 210 with a minimum grade of C

This course will examine human motion, including the structure and function of the various systems that contribute to movement from a mathematical and physical principles perspective. Special emphasis is placed on the movement analysis and how technique can be examined using the theories within biomechanics. Also emphasized is the biomechanical analysis of motion using advance technological tools available in this discipline.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 330 Motor Learning 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: EXSC 210, EXSC 300 with a minimum grade of C

Acquaints the student with the concepts and principles involved in motor skill learning and performance; in particular, the implications for teaching and progressions in learning are stressed. A laboratory experience provides opportunities to replicate theoretical constructs.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 340 Graded Exercise Testing 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EXSC 300 with a minimum grade of C

This course focuses on theoretical information about the administration and application of graded exercise stress tests. The electrocardiogram (ECG) and maximum oxygen uptake values during rest and exercise are conducted.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 350 Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise Leadership 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EXSC 300 with a minimum grade of C

This course reviews the practical applications of exercise leadership for the apparently healthy individual as well as individuals with cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases and disabilities, neuromuscular disorders, and cognitive and emotional disorders. This course is a leadership physical activity course.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 360 Exercise Programs for Special Populations 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EXSC 300 with a minimum grade of C

Students will learn to organize, lead, and supervise programs of physical exercise and conditioning in industrial, business, recreational, educational, and athletic settings. In addition, students will practice using results of diagnostic tests to prescribe appropriate activities for a wide variety of populations.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 370 Exercise Programs for Older Adults 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: EXSC 300 with a minimum grade of C

Prepares students to plan and conduct basic physical activity and exercise programs for the elderly. Although the emphasis is on exercise routines and fitness programs, students also learn to lead older adults in rhythmic and dance activities and recreational games. A three-week training period is followed by a twelve-week practical experience at a senior citizen site (nutrition site, day care center, or some other senior citizen center). Weekly seminars are held in conjunction with the practical experiences.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 380 Exercise and Sport Psychology** 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSYC 101

This course will provide an overview of the major concepts which define the field of sports and exercise psychology including, but not limited to: the foundations of sports psychology, personality and sports, motivation, arousal/stress/anxiety, competition and cooperation, intrinsic motivation, and group dynamics. This course will encourage you to think critically about a variety of sports and exercise topics while actively applying them to your own life and everyday experiences. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HSCI 480 Health Education and Promotion 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: HSCI 190, HSCI 195, and NTSI 201 or BIOL 260

This course aims to provide students with the skills to develop theoretically-informed and evidence-based community health initiatives. Students will explore innovative, meaningful and effective teaching and learning approaches and materials used in health education and social marketing. Also covered is the measurement of population health, sources of data, methods for assessing population health improvements and other skills that reflect the responsibilities and competencies of the entry-level certified health educator specialist (CHES). Over the course of the semester, students work in teams on developing and evaluating their own culturally-competent health initiative, each of which is targeted at a particular population with a specific health need. After completing this course students will be equipped with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to raise people's health awareness, as a well as the tools needed to teach people how to reduce their risk of disease and promote health and wellness.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-4
    Total: 15–16 Credits
** EXSC 380 Exercise and Sport Psychology is cross-listed with PSYC 321.
 
General Electives Credits:
Consult with advisor on all elective choices 15
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
 
Capstone Project Credits:
EXSC 400 Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Exercise Science 3
This course involves the investigation and study of current research topics using directed research and readings as they apply to the field of exercise science. This course is the senior seminar course that is completed along with internship. This course is a research-based and writing-intensive course.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
EXSC 410 Senior Practicum 4
This is the culminating experience for students in the exercise physiology concentration. Students are assigned to a sport-specific training facility, corporate fitness center, hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation center, or other clinically-based wellness/fitness or rehabilitation facility for practical experience in the application of concepts.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-4
    Total: 7 Credits
Capstone courses (EXSC 400 and EXSC 410) must be taken together in the same semester.
 
Total Program Requirement = 121–123 credits