Civic Engagement Minor
Curriculum

Minor Requirements

Required Course Credits:
ICLT 332 Speaking Truth to Power: Life Writing and Civic Engagement 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

In this course, students will examine the role of active citizenship in participatory democracy, particularly when considering what the American Association of Colleges and Universities refers to as the "unscripted problems" of the 21st-century on local, national, and global scales. "Unscripted" here implies that the story about how these problems will be solved and by whom remains untold, and we will look to the life-writing (memoir and biography) of previous change-makers and justice­seekers to examine the relationship of the individual to a community and institutions when participating on social movements in varying scopes. The course will focus on the tools, concepts, and background needed to assess a societal problem and determine the possibility for individual and collective contributions toward change. A service learning project with a community partner is required.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-2-3
 
Capstone Course Credits:
WRIT 220 Workshop in Publication 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111

A continuation of WRIT 210.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
 
Creative/Cultural Expression (choose one) Credits:
ADVG 101 Introduction to Advertising 3
This course provides a comprehensive survey of modern advertising covering the major media: online, print, radio and television. Media are compared for their utility, impact and effectiveness as vehicles for advertising. Principles of good advertising copy and production are emphasized as are advertising ethics. Required of advertising majors.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ADVG 150 Planning and Creating the Advertising Campaign 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ADVG 101

This course moves onto the study of planning, organizing and executing an advertising campaign, including such elements as research, market analysis, target market, consumer and trade strategy, budget, media strategy, promotion and evaluation. The creation of online, print and broadcast advertising is included, as is the role of the client in campaign planning. Required of advertising majors.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ADVG 215 Global Advertising and Public Relations 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PREL 101 and ADVG 101

Students will examine and analyze cultural diversity as it applies to advertising and public relations to global corporations, non- profit organizations and consumers. Students will learn to think critically to determine the best advertising and public relations strategies in foreign markets. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/ or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARTH 301 Aesthetics I 3
A survey of the visual arts of the present day. Comparative analysis of the visual arts and the various performing and literary arts. The study of the more notable historical contemplation on the nature of art and beauty.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARTH 351 Aesthetics II 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
COMM 210 Broadcast History and Criticism 3
This course surveys the development of radio, television and new media in the United States. Strong consideration is given of to the impact of cultural, technological, and economic forces on broadcasting and cable. Special emphasis is placed on major trends in both entertainment and factual programming. The course includes class lectures plus viewing assignments.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-1-3
COMM 215 Media History 3
This survey of radio and television development in the United States includes consideration of the roles played by the broadcast media as cultural, social, and economic forces. Special emphasis is placed on major trends in both entertainment and factual programming. This course includes class lectures plus independent viewing assignments. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FILM 210 History of Motion Pictures 3
This survey course explores the development of the film as an art form and a technique. How the feature-length film became the preeminent form of entertainment during the 20th century will be examined .Fifteen hours of selected representative films are screened during the laboratory portion of the course. Post-screening analysis and research are required.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-1-3
FILM 215 The Documentary in Film and Television 3
This course provides a historical survey of the documentary film and its role as an educational, ideological, and sociological force. Post-screening analysis, and research are required.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-3-3
ICLT 301 American Immigrant Literature 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Students will read, discuss, and write about contemporary American immigrant literature and related texts from other disciplines, becoming conversant in issues surrounding recent immigration to the United States and how authors respond to them in literature. The course includes classroom presentations and a research essay.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 302 Strange Creations: Literature, Intelligent Technology, and Ethics 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This course examines literary representations of artificial, intelligent servants, such as robots, androids, computer networks, and human replicants. Using a broad definition of intelligent systems, a definition which includes intelligent networks as well as artificial humans, we will explore tales about such creations. These stories will range from very ancient legends and written accounts from Chinese, Indian and Greek sources to medieval and Renaissance stories of talking, moving statues, and talking brass heads. We will also discuss later tales in which artificial humanoids are central figures. The focus of our explorations will be how these tales represent various views of the appropriate bounds for humankind's intellectual and scientific ambition.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 309 Literary Journalism of the 1960s 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This interdisciplinary seminar examines the work of the so-called "New Journalists" of the 1960s; a cadre of writers who include luminaries from the world of literature, including Norman Mailer, Truman Capote, Joan Didion and Tom Wolfe. Combining the techniques and tools of fictional writing with journalistic reportage, these writers sought to decode and interpret some of the major upheavals and social movements of the 1960s, while forging a vibrant and powerful new genre, whose influence is still being felt today.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 310 Neoyorquinos! Latino Culture in New York 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

In this course students will read, discuss, and write about U.S. Latino/Latina culture based in and around New York City. The main texts will be literary, including prose fiction, poetry, memoirs, and essays, drawn mostly from the last 50 years. Students will also study Latin music, cinema, and other cultural objects, analyzing texts for how they represent the experience of being a Latino/an American in U.S. society and how they portray New York as a site where Latino culture comes into contact with others.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 314 Make a New World: Modern Drama as Political Protest and Social Prophecy 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

In this seminar, students will study modern plays which shaped the social and political landscape of their times, whether through shocking protest or ironic commentary. Each work will be examined as catalyst or prophecy of change within its contemporary social and political context. It will be studied as well within the context of other artistic media, including film, painting, and sculpture, as a means to identify and analyze different themes and techniques of protest and commentary.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 315 Revolution from Within and Without: The Art and Literature of Social Change 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This course focuses on poetry and prose having to do with social and spiritual revolutions through history. The idea of revolution is analyzed through discussion of key images, motifs, visual works and literary techniques.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 320 Global Literature and Human Rights 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This course will explore the theme of global human rights and literary expression. We will read literary texts addressing the issues raised by Sander Gilman in the above quotation. They will help us consider the role of art and literature in the struggle for human rights, including the writer's struggle to represent often unspeakable crimes against humanity and create a cultural memory that recognizes the forgotten or marginalized voices from the past. What does it mean to bear witness through literature? What is the reader's role in the process? The role of advancing technologies in documenting and archiving human rights crises will also be examined. Interdisciplinary perspectives, including historical/legal documents; psychological theories on torture, traumatic memory, and witnessing; and sociological research on collective/cultural dimensions of human rights issues, will be addressed. The class will explore human rights issues across cultures and continents, making every effort to respect specific cultural values and practices while also thinking about the universal implications of human rights.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 321 LGBT Literature 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

In this seminar, students will explore literary representations of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered individuals from approximately 1890 through the present. Readings will focus on pre- and post-Gay Liberation texts, beginning with texts published shortly after the late-19th- century medical designation of "homosexuality" and ending with "post-queer" writings of the 21st century. Readings include poetry, plays, short stories, novels, films, and essays on the medical, social, political, and religious constructions of homosexuality. Course requirements included a critical essay, a research project, an oral presentation, and midterm and final essay exams.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 322 New York Literature 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

In this seminar, students will explore the principal literature of America's cultural, historic and financial capital: New York City. Since the early 1600's, New York has been a universal symbol of diversity and conflict. The city's writings reveal celebratory and violent attempts to sustain cultural plurality that is unknown anywhere else in the world. Readings included poetry, plays, short stories, novels, films, and essays on the social, political, and religious constructions of New York "identity." Course requirements include a critical essay, a research project, an oral presentation, and midterm and final essay exams.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 324 Toil and Trouble: The Literature of Work 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

In this seminar, we will examine the theme of "work" as it is reflected in fiction and poetry from the 19th through the 21st centuries. "Work" is central to our lives, yet we rarely reflect on it. This seminar will encourage us to think about how "work" affects not only our own lives, but also wider cultural values and social trends. What distinguishes contemporary "work" and workplace dynamics from earlier forms of labor? How does "work" determine economic or social class? Ho do different cultures define the boundaries between "work" and "leisure"? And how do fiction writers depict "work" through the elements of plot, character, setting, and style? Our texts will include poetry, short stories, novels, and films, as well as non-fiction texts and materials from the fields of economics, philosophy, and history. Course requirements include an analytical research paper, a team oral presentation, and both a midterm and final exam,

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 325 Cityscapes: The City in World Literature 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

In this seminar, we will examine the themes and structures of cities as they appear or are imagined in selected literature from around the world. Both as setting and metaphor, cities reflect our political, social, and economic ambitions- and, as the site of urban poverty and alienation, our cultural failures, as well. Out texts will include poetry, drama, fiction, and film from Asia Africa, Europe, and the Americas from ancient times to the modern era. Course requirements include an analytical research paper, a team oral presentation and both a midterm and final exam.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICLT 326 Travel Literature: Explorations in Cultural Exchange 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

This course examines the rich literary heritage of travel writing. As civilizations began exploring beyond their national boundaries, many people began writing about their adventures of encountering different cultures and civilizations. The course approaches the literature historically, and engages students in a wide variety of cultural expressions and exchanges. Includes a literary research project and an oral presentation.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 305 Vietnam Through Film 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This course critically examines the Roots of the Vietnam War, the United States involvement in the war, the Antiwar Movement and its impact on the war, and finally, the lessons learned from this experience. We will examine both the experiences of Americans and the Vietnamese soldiers who fought in what is now termed the Second Indochina War.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3 Credits
 
History/Politics/Government (choose one) Credits:
ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology 3
An introduction to the study of ancient man and primitive cultures. Major topics include: the origin and evolution of man; the evolution of different cultural forms in terms of craft and technology, magic, religion, and government.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
COMM 301 Communication Law 3
This survey of the statutes and regulations governing the press, broadcasting, film, and the Internet includes the analysis of defamation, contempt, privacy, freedom of speech, censorship, political expression, and intellectual property. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
COMM 330 Media Law and Ethics 3
This survey of the statues and regulations governing the press, broadcasting, film and the internet includes the analysis of defamation, contempt, privacy, freedom of speech, censorship, and political expression. Open to juniors and seniors. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/ or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
CRIM 300 Ethics in Criminal Justice 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and SOCI 101

This course is devoted to the detailed examination of current and historical ethical issues in the criminal justice system. Topics covered will include police use of force, police corruption, ethical issues in punishment, the death penalty, and sentencing disparities.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
CRIM 305 Police and Community Relations 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and CRIM 111

This course will examine the intersection between law enforcement and ethnic/minority communities both nationally and internationally. Emphasis will be placed on exploring how these communities experience policing and the impact this has on issues of trust, cooperation, and community empowerment. Throughout the course, students will explore the role of community policing in modern law enforcement practices

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FILM 230 Film History 3
This survey course explores the development of the film as an art form. How the feature length film became the preeminent form of entertainment during the 20th century will be examined. Selected representative films are screened during the laboratory portion of the course. Pre-screening discussion and research are required. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/ or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HIST 110 American History 3
This is a survey course of American history from the colonial period, the Revolution to the establishment of the Republic, the first half of the 19th century, up through the period of the Civil War, ending in 1865. The impact of geography on the growth of the Republic is considered. The political, economic, and cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the student with historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present-day issues.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HIST 150 American History II 3
This is a survey course of American history from the end of the Civil War to the present: the period of the Reconstruction, the industrialization of the United States, the emergence of the country as a Great Power, U.S. role in the twentieth century are considered. The political, economic, and cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the student with historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present day issues.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HIST 210 The Contemporary World 3
This is a survey course of 20th century global history; it covers the period of imperialism leading to World War I, the emergence of the U.S.S.R. as a major power, the transformation of Europe as a result of World War II, the period of the Cold War, the role of the U.S. in the post-cold war world. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of geography, science and technology on political, economic and cultural development of the world.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HIST 220 African American Experience 3
A survey of the role of African American people in American history from African beginnings to the present time. Topics include: African American response to the major political, social and economic changes in America; the contributions of outstanding African American to American history; the interaction of the African American and majority environments; and the black movements that help shape African American consciousness.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HIST 230 Survey of Jewish History 3
A survey of the life of the Jewish people from their beginnings in the Near East to the mid-20th century. Attention is focused on major migrations, leading personalities, and historic movements.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICBS 302 Intergroup Relations: Understanding Prejudice, Stereotyping, and Discrimination 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This seminar course will provide an overview of theoretical perspectives, research methods, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on prejudice, stigma, and intergroup relations. Students will better understand psychological principles underlying prejudiced attitudes and discriminatory behaviors, gain a more objective view of their personal beliefs and behaviors, and further develop their ability to critically think about the nature of evidence and arguments from a scientific perspective.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICBS 303 Dynamics of Violence 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This seminar course will provide an overview of theoretical perspectives, research methods, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on the nature, causes, and dynamics of violence. Topics covered include but are not limited to psychological principles underlying aggression, various types of violence, profiles of violent individuals, and ways to prevent violence.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICBS 304 Beyond Shelter: Housing, Social Processes, and Community Development 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

This course draws on work from sociology, environmental psychology and urban planning to facilitate an understanding of housing that goes beyond shelter. Students will learn how housing connects with social processes such as political participation, public health, and economic crisis. The course is organized around in-depth thematic modules to support students in learning about housing, social processes and community development while developing skills in textual analysis, written and oral communication and critical thinking. Open to all students, this course may be particularly relevant to those interested in social work, architecture and design, real estate, economics, history or sociology.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICBS 305 The Psychology of Gender Identity 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This seminar course will provide an overview of theoretical perspectives, interdisciplinary perspectives, empirical findings, and practical applications of psychological research on gender identity. Students will better understand psychological principles underlying gender identity, gain a more objective view of their personal beliefs and behaviors, and further develop their ability to critically think about the nature of evidence and arguments from a scientific perspective.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICBS 306 The Real New York: Sociology and the City 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This course introduces students to the subject and methodology of urban sociology by exploring the social structure of New York City and its suburbs since 1945. The insights of urban sociology will be applied to interdisciplinary themes from contemporary and historical New York society including: ethnicity, gender roles and family, employment, social class and inequality, neighborhood structure, suburbanization, gentrification, public space, urban culture, crime, education, and social welfare.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICBS 308 Parenting and Culture 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Parenting is shaped by and a reflection of the broader cultural setting in which development unfolds. This seminar on parenting and culture examines parenting views and practices through a cultural lens, thereby highlighting the many ways that parents support children's integration into their cultural communities. Students will learn about the ways that researchers have conceptualized and studied "parenting" and "cultural groups around the globe are examined. Topics include: changes to parenting over the life course of the child; parenting influences on children's development; and socio-cultural and economic influences on parenting.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICPH 301 The Philosophy of Human Nature 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This interdisciplinary course based in philosophy is a study of classic sources of ideas on the nature of humankind as found in Western religion, in the ancient world, and in modern philosophy. The course will examine contemporary theories of human nature that reflect upon the human being as a psychological or as a genetic mechanism, as a maker of tools, a speaker of language, as dominated by its animal nature, and as a being abandoned in a godless world.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICPH 305 Beauty, Morality, Taste, Tech, and the Philosophy of Art 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

This interdisciplinary philosophy course will study the impact of philosophy, art history, belief systems, social movements, and critical theory on the development of Western art and culture from beginning of written history to the present. In addition, comparable art practices from non-Western cultures will be studied.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 303 The American Character: A Global Perspective 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This seminar will explore five features of the "American Character" from a global perspective. The course will examine historical and contemporary developments, which include the twenty-first century and beyond.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 304 Great Cities Past and Present 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Great Cities is an interdisciplinary history seminar that explores selected big cities to see how human beings, across the globe, have coped with the pressures of urbanization. The different case study cities are grouped into themes that illustrate varieties of urban growth. The interrelationship of time with money, power, social patterns, and urban design will be explored in each of these examples.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 306 Modern New York 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This seminar course considers the ways in which New York has been rebuilt and redefined by people and institutions since the late nineteenth century. Topics include: Wall Street and trusts; Gilded Age politics; water, parks, and mass transportation; apartment houses, tenements, and housing reform; class warfare and the labor movement; fine arts and popular amusements; national mass culture and the 1920s boom; Depression and Fiorello La Guardia; Robert Moses and urban renewal; suburbanization; the urban crisis; the new immigrants; globalization and post-industrial reform.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 307 Seminar in Economic Crises 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

During 2008 and 2009 the world economy, grappling with the subprime mortgage problem, faced its deepest economic downturn since the 1930's. As a result of this crisis, how the macro economy works and the future shape of capitalism is in heated debate among economists. This course will analyze what is now called "The Great Recession," looking at its possible causes and long-term consequences. A number of alternative views are discussed based on ideas and theories developed by economists going back to the Classic School in the 19th century to the more current view of Keynesian and monetarist economists. A comparison between the current crisis and the Great Depression and other cyclical downtowns is made.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 310 The Modern Middle East: A Global Perspective 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

This course will explore the complex relationship the Middle East maintains in world affairs. Some topics include: the struggle against Western domination and influence, the transformation of the period (1908-1923), Turkey's rise to a secular state, the rise of nationalism, the rise of Islam, Islamic Renewal, Egypt as the forefront of women's liberation in the region, the role of the Arab/Islamic woman, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the struggle for Palestine, and the oil factor.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 313 Seminar on Islamic Society and Civilization to 1830 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

This course is dedicated to an analytical approach to some of the most important elements in the rise, flourishing, and the decline of the Islamic society and culture in its first 1200 years of history. Highlights from its scientific, artistic, architectural renovations will be studied in detail, while the landmark events in its history and general social and economic experience will be identified and analyzed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 314 Seminar on Global Conflict 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

This course is an analytical approach to some of the most important elements in natural human rivalries that lead to conflict. It will distinguish three distinct types of conflict and, using the current trends, postulates on future prospects of each type of conflict: symmetrical, asymmetrical and economic.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PHIL 220 Ethics and Social Philosophy 3
An examination of some of the most critical issues of moral and social philosophy. These include subjects such as the linguistic analysis of terms such as good, evil, duty, right, and others. The basis of different moral systems will be studied, and selections from ethical and social philosophers will be read.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 110 American Government and Politics 3
This course is an introduction to the processes of the American form of democratic government; the nature and structure of U.S. government; its chief characteristics and functions. Special attention is paid to the intimate relation and mutual impact of government and the people on each other, expanding the students' awareness of the effects of governmental decisions on the American people.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 210 Comparative Government 3
An introduction to comparative political structures and institutions covering the major European governments as well as non-Western political systems.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 220 History of Political Thought 3
A study of the historical and theoretical underpinnings to current political ideologies, starting with the Greek city state and the political theories of Plato and Aristotle, continuing with the Roman, Medieval and Renaissance contributions to political thought and culminating in the radical political theories of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 230 International Relations 3
A systematic analysis of national goals and determinants, the basis of national power, sources of international conflict. The uses of power: balance of power and the balance of terror. Diplomacy, collective security, and international organizations will also be explored.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 240 Basic Legal Concepts and Administration of Justice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
PSCI 305 Politics and Society 3
The fundamental concepts of the state, government, and their interrelationships. Topics include: the state as an instrument of social control; power, its legitimacy and authority; political doctrines such as democracy, oligarchy, and totalitarianism; the modern state and its political structures, elites, and decision makers; the electoral process and sociopolitical means of attitudinal influence. The impact of class, status, and influence will also be analyzed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 310 Politics of Change 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSCI 110

This course is concerned with the impact of modernization on the political system; the relationship between modernization and decolonization, revolution and nation-building; theories of political change; and the consequences of modernization as experienced by several countries from the First, Second, and Third Worlds.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 315 American Society and Judicial Behavior 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSCI 110

This course covers changing values and patterns of judicial behavior, federal courts and the power of judicial review, fundamental constitutional principles, nationalization and enforcement of the Bill of Rights, the Supreme Court's policy-making role and its effect on economic policy, and the controversy over the arbiter role of the court. Included will be an analysis of constitutional development of rights and duties of the people, and the role of the government as an institution.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 320 Foreign Policy of the United States 3
The historical development of American policy, the mechanics of its formulation, and its current objectives will be studied, discussed, and analyzed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 325 Public Administration 3
This is a study of the nature and scope of public administration: principles, societal protection, assistance to various groups, governmental proprietary enterprises, and regulation of business. Bureaucratic organization administration relationships. Policy making and implementation will be closely examined: unit specialization, organization coordination, centralization, planning, efficiencies, and control.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 350 Government and Metropolitan Problems 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSCI 110

The first part comprises the political framework: state governmental structure, its functions, services, and financing; local, rural, and urban governments, their structures, services, and functions. The second half focuses on metropolitan problems and their interaction with metropolitan government; housing, schooling, transportation, sanitation, pollution, and taxation. Social parameters stemming from ethnic, religious, class, and employment factors, among others, will be interwoven in the analysis.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 355 Government and Business 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSCI 110

A consideration of relationships between business enterprise and the societal and political milieu in which these enterprises operate. New concepts in business ethics and corporate responsibility. Government regulation of business activity.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 360 International Law and Organization 3
The nature of international law; the organization of the community of nations; the United Nations system; the regional organizations of the bloc type; the substantive rules of international law; procedures for the pacific settlement of international disputes; international and social cooperation; and prospects for a development system of world order through international organization.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 365 Public Policy Analysis 3
This course will approach public policy decisions to determine goal achievement in terms of need articulation, relative costs and expended resources, planning and programming for future needs, and resource development.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSCI 410 Seminar in Government and Politics 3


SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
An analysis of the social and cultural forces that govern human behavior. The principal topics include: social interaction and organization, socialization processes, primary groups and the family (associations, bureaucracy, and other social institutions), collective behavior, population, and ecology.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
SOCI 150 American Urban Minorities 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: SOCI 101

An in-depth analysis of the diverse ethnic structure of the urban community. Major attention is given to black, Puerto Rican, and Mexican groups. Topics include: a survey of each group's social and economic structure, an examination of ghetto conditions and their effects, the impact of urban conditions on the new arrival, a comparison with the adaptation and treatment accorded earlier migrants, the validity of the melting pot concept, and a comparison of the life styles of various minority groups.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
SOCI 175 Social Problems 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and SOCI 101

A sociological analysis of social problems in American society. All social problems will be viewed from a structural perspective, i.e., the root cause of a social problem lies in the institutional arrangements of a given society. Various institutional arrangements of American society that give rise to social problems will be evaluated in terms of value-conflicts, power structures, and economic institutions. Major topics include: inequality, poverty, environmental destruction, ageism, educational institutions, social deviance, unemployment, problems of the city.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
SOCI 273 Juvenile Delinquency 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and SOCI 101

An inquiry into the causes of juvenile delinquency and the social and psychological factors involved in the predictive studies and theories concerning the development of delinquency. Topics also include formation of youth gangs, methods of coping the gang activity, the types of crime committed by children and youths, narcotics problems, neglected and retarded children, the youthful offender and wayward minor, the operation of the Children's Court, crime prevention programs.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
SOCI 278 Criminology 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and SOCI 101

An examination of crime and theories of crime causation. Topics include: the white collar criminal, the professional criminal, and the structure of organized crime. The criminal-justice process is analyzed, including the role of the police, the criminal courts, the probation officer, correctional services, and the re-entry of the offender into society.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
SOCI 301 Marriage and the Family 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: SOCI 101

The course covers historical changes in family patterns, contemporary family life in different cultures and subcultures, evolution of the American family pattern, functions of the family, the family as primary group, kinship patterns, and nuclear and extended families. Other topics include: dating, mate selection, family disorganization, and marital success.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
SOCI 340 Social Stratification 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
SOCI 348 Introduction to Sociological Theory 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
SOCI 355 Urban Society 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: SOCI 101

A sociological analysis of modern urban ways of life. The formation of a core city, suburbs, metropolitan areas, and a giant urban area (megalopolis). The development of slums and the social problems which attend slum conditions. Also, problems of urban renewal, transportation, integration of community functions, ethnic distribution, social stratification, and land usage. Major emphasis is on the New York metropolitan area as compared with other major cities.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
SOCI 379 Social Policy 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
    Total: 3 Credits
 
Science/Technology (choose one) Credits:
ANTH 205 Anthropology of Health 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ANTH 101

This course focuses on the anthropological approach to health, in which the student develops a holistic perspective by integrating biological, ecological, sociocultural, and historical aspects of health and illness. Examples are taken from societies throughout the inhabited world and in various time periods. Specific topics include human reproduction, nutrition, the use of psychoactive drugs, and the relationship between caregivers and their clients. The relationships of minority cultural systems within larger pluralistic societies are also studied.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
BIOL 101 Humanity and the Biological Universe 3
This course acquaints students with basic biological, health and environmental issues of the modern world. To achieve intended awareness, students will study basic anatomy, physiology, genetics and microbiology. Special attention will be given to contemporary problems such as AIDS, genetic engineering, cancer, heart disease and pollution. The student will use basic mathematical, computer and quantitative reasoning skills to present cohesive written summations of learning.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
BIOL 103 Nutrition and Society 3
An introduction to the principles of nutrition in food management. Includes food customs, patterns and habits, nutrients in foods, applied nutrition, and world nutrition problems and programs.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
BIOL 107 Environmental Sciences 3
A multi-disciplinary approach is taken to the environmental and ecological sciences emphasizing principles, problems, and alternative approaches to solutions. Students study how the equilibrium and stability of ecosystems are affected by human activity. Current models are examined for their efficacy in solving environmental degradation problems. The issues are treated in sufficient depth to permit quantitative reasoning and assessment, especially in such vital topics as demographic trends of humanity in a resource-limited biosphere. Human physiological and behavioral requisites are interwoven with the fabric of culture and technology in modern society. Information systems and models are used. In addition to lectures and seminars, students are required to become involved in a term activity, project or paper, which may integrate several disciplines.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
HIST 240 History of Technology 3
The history of Western technology is surveyed with emphasis on technological change since the Industrial Revolution. Attention is given to both the positive and the negative aspects of technological change. The various interrelationships among technological change and other aspects of history are highlighted, as is the phenomenon of the geometrical progression of technological changes.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICBS 311 Global Culture, Technology, and Human Relationships 3
This course is designed to help you meet the challenges of living in a global digital economy, a world in which, increasingly, you will be expected to interact with people who may not be like you in fundamental ways. We are living in a century with connectivity as its currency and mobility as a passage for personal and professional success. The overarching focus in the course is on helping you become more sensitive to cultural differences, and to provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to interact across cultures. We study cultural factors subject to variance and the communication approaches needed to effectuate meaningful business, diplomatic, and humanitarian interactions. Attention paid to communication strategies, technological tools, personal diplomacy, new media, and business practices and customs across cultural borders. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits 3-0-3

ICBS 309 Anthropological Approaches to Health Seminar 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This seminar course in health and anthropology will examine this subfield within the diachronic context of the theoretical framework from functionalism to the recent more holistic multidisciplinary perspectives of cultural, ecological, and bio-cultural approaches. Moreover, individual health issues such as infectious epidemics, nutrition, stress, etc. will be examined from a cross-cultural as well as from a biological perspective. Attention will be given to cultural beliefs and customs as they interact in the adaptive relationship between disease and the physical environment. We shall also be concerned with the dynamic interplay between the healers, the healing situation (traditional and non-traditional), and the clients as they participate in the healing process.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICPH 306 Bioethics 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

An interdisciplinary philosophy seminar that introduces students to the field of bioethics- the study of ethical issues involving the biomedical and life sciences. The course includes readings of moral theories in philosophy and uses these concepts as a framework to examine key issues in bioethics. Topics covered in the course may include classic cases in bioethics as well as contemporary debates prompted by emerging technologies.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 301 Environmental History 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Environmental history is an interdisciplinary seminar that explores topics such as Native American environmental practices, colonialism and the environment, the Industrial Revolution, nineteenth and twentieth century environmentalism, suburbanization and post-industrial societies, socialism and the developing world, and scholarly debates over environmental history.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 308 Seminar in Economics of Sustainable Growth
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This course examines issues involved in sustainable development. The significant contribution that economic analysis can make in understanding the nature of problems in sustainable development and in providing possible solutions is the central focus of the course. The role that economic and political institutions play in allocating natural resources is examined. Students are exposed to a number of emerging sustainability issues including global warming and given ample opportunities to develop their own perspective.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ICSS 309 Technology and Global Issues 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161). Course is limited to juniors and seniors.

In this course the relationships between technology and global concerns are explored. Topics such as sustainable development, standards, ethics, environmental concerns and public policies related to design and development, energy, transportation, air and water facing both developed and developing nations will be discussed. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PHIL 230 Technology, Society, and Values 3
An examination of models and case studies concerned with the impact of machines on man, of technological systems on social structures, and modes of production on value systems. Special attention is paid to the ethical problems connected with newly emerging technologies.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
SOCI 376 Medical Sociology 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
    Total: 3 Credits
 
Total Required Credits = 15