Life Sciences, B.S. / Occupational Therapy, OTD
Curriculum

Discovery Core

Foundations Credits:
FCWR 101 Writing I: Foundations of College Composition 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: WRIT 100 or Writing Placement Exam

A course introducing students to the fundamentals of college composition. Topics include writing process, rhetorical strategies, basics of critical reading and thinking, analytical writing, and argumentative writing. This course serves as a foundation to prepare students to succeed in other academic writing contexts. Coursework includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 151 Writing II: Foundations of Research Writing 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: FCWR 101 or WRIT 101

Further development of the academic writing, critical thinking, and analytical reading skills taught in Writing I. An introduction to academic discourse in the four core seminar areas: literature, social sciences, behavioral sciences, and philosophy. Development of library skills leading to a documented research paper.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 302 Communication for Healthcare Careers 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Building on courses taken in their majors, students will learn and apply concepts of effective written and oral expression appropriate for careers in the health and biology professions. In addition to closely examining a variety of texts across the discipline, students will develop public speaking skills while also learning to collaborate on grant proposals, literature reviews, pamphlets and posters, and a research paper. Topics covered include the rhetoric of writing in the health professions, ethics, images in the sciences, grant- and abstract writing, and researching and writing publishable manuscripts. Course work includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSP 105 Foundations of Speech Communication 3
Study of the fundamentals of verbal communication including public speaking, interpersonal communication, and small group interaction. Training in methods of obtaining and organizing materials and ideas for effective verbal communication.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCIQ 101 Foundations of Inquiry 3
This course introduces you to the fundamentals of critical thinking. Topics include an overview of the research methods in various academic disciplines, reasoning, constructing an argument, and evaluating information. This course serves as a foundation for your continued development of critical thinking skills in other core classes, your major program coursework, and your personal and professional life.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 15 Credits
 
Seminars Credits:
ICLT 3XX Literature choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICPH 3XX Philosophy choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICSS 3XX Social Science choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICBS 309 Anthropological Approaches to Health 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

This seminar course in health and anthropology will examine this subfield within the diachronic context of the theoretical framework from functionalism to the recent more holistic multidisciplinary perspectives of cultural, ecological, and bio-cultural approaches. Moreover, individual health issues such as infectious epidemics, nutrition, stress, etc. will be examined from a cross-cultural as well as from a biological perspective. Attention will be given to cultural beliefs and customs as they interact in the adaptive relationship between disease and the physical environment. We shall also be concerned with the dynamic interplay between the healers, the healing situation (traditional and non-traditional), and the clients as they participate in the healing process.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 12 Credits
 
Math and Science Core Credits:
Math 141 Precalculus 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 100 or MATH 101 or Math Placement Exam

A study of relations and functions; inequalities; complex numbers; quadratic equations; linear systems of equations; higher degree equations; trigonometric functions; identities; functions of composite angles; graphs of the trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; and binomial theorem. Note: A graphing calculator is used throughout the course.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
BIOL 110 General Biology I 4
The similarity in living things is demonstrated by a molecular and cellular approach to biology. After introductory biochemistry, the cell as the basic unit of life is studied structurally and metabolically. Life functions are examined from a cellular and from a vertebrate-organismic viewpoint. The central theme is the flow of energy between the biosphere and the ecosphere. The scientific method and hypothesis-testing are stressed as a means of investigation and forming conclusions. Collaborative laboratory assignments will include microscopic studies of the cell, its functions, and the dissection of a fetal pig.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 8 Credits
 

Major Requirements

Biological and Chemical Sciences Credits:
BIOL 150 General Biology II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 110

The variety of living things is demonstrated by a study of representative plants and animals, emphasizing the viewpoints of taxonomy, phylogeny, morphology, and physiology. The continuity of life is demonstrated through studies in reproduction, genetics, and organic evolution. Scientific inquiry and critical thinking strategies are emphasized. Collaborative laboratory assignments include the dissection and study of fixed and living specimens representing the whole range of life.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 210 Human Gross Anatomy 4
A structural study of the human body. Topics include cells and tissue, skeleton, articulation, muscles, body systems, special organs, and surface anatomy.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 260 Nutrition and Diet Therapy 3
The purpose of this course is to provide theoretical knowledge that will be useful in clinical practice concerning the roles of food in maintaining health and in treatment of disease. Topics include the physiology of digestion, absorption and metabolism; the nutrient contents of foods, the nutritional requirements of people in health and in illness, and through the life cycle. Specific nutritional requirements of individual diseases will also be covered, as well as the various responsibilities of various health professionals, such as dietitians, nurses and physicians in comprehensive care of the patient.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
BIOL 310 Human Physiology 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 210 and one course in this group: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110. Life Sciences Osteopathy: One course in this group: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110.

An introductory course in the functions and mechanisms of the human body. Laboratory exercises include the detection and measurement of these functions using modern methods.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
BIOL 312 Pathophysiology 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 310 or BIOL 311

This course focuses on the basic physiological mechanisms and principles involved in the development of illness. It is intended to relate specific lesions and dysfunctions to the Origins of specific diseases. Topics include the role of microbial infection in disorders of the immune system, disorders of the vascular system and heart, especially as affected by nutritional factors; the origin and effects of tumors; the study of the gene dysfunctions. The latter part of the course provides brief descriptions of the more important diseases of organs and organ systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, hematopoietic, etc.) with emphasis on pathogenetic mechanisms.

BIOL 315 Neuroscience 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 310 or BIOL 311

The student will acquire a basic understanding of the anatomy of the nervous system and its functioning. Histology of nervous tissue, major divisions of the central and peripheral nervous systems and embryological development are introduced. The topographic and intimal anatomy of the central nervous system, including the spinal cord, brainstem, midbrain, diencephalon and forebrain, are then discussed. Functional aspects are emphasized and examples of common clinical problems are given. A systems approach is also used to introduce the special senses, including vision, audition, olfaction, and the general systems of sensation and motor functioning. The hypothalamus, the autonomic nervous system and the limbic areas are also presented. Neuroscience and clinical subjects are also emphasized, as well as higher cognitive functioning, reflex activity and circadian rhythms.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
CHEM 105 Applied Chemistry 3
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: TMAT 135 or MATH 141

For bachelor of technology majors. An introduction to basic chemical concepts and their application to industrial technology. Studies will include basic chemical concepts and calculations, the relationship of atomic structure and bonding to chemical and physical properties and the state of matter, and the role of thermal chemistry, thermodynamics and oxidation-reduction in determining the rates and extent of chemical reactions. The laboratory work will illustrate common laboratory techniques and the lecture materials presented.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-3-3
CHEM 215 Bio-Organic Chemistry 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 105 or CHEM 110

The basic concepts of organic chemistry and biochemistry are covered. Topics include hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, alcohols, phenols and ethers, carbonyl compounds, amines, amides, carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins, nucleic acids and the relationship of these chemicals to metabolic pathways. This course does not satisfy the organic chemistry or biochemistry course requirements for other science majors.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 28 Credits
 
Behavioral Sciences Requirements Credits:
ANTH 101 Anthropology 3
An introduction to the study of ancient man and primitive cultures. Major topics include: the origin and evolution of man; the evolution of different cultural forms in terms of craft and technology, magic, religion, and government.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSYC 101 Introductory Psychology 3
An introduction to selected concepts, methods, and vocabulary of psychology. Focus of study will be on the individual and the conditions that influence behavior. Topics that will be covered include: growth and development, learning and thinking, emotions and motivations, personality and assessment, mal-adjustment and mental health, groups and social interaction, and social influence and society.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSYC 210 Statistical Analysis 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 115 or MATH 125 or MATH 140 or MATH 141 or MATH 160 or MATH 161 or MATH 170 or MATH 180 or TMAT 135 or TMAT 155

This course covers descriptive and inferential statistics, frequency distributions, percentile rank, measure of central tendency and variability, correlation and regression and tests of significance. Using computer software, students will directly apply these statistics to specific problems common to the behavioral sciences.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-4
PSYC 310 Abnormal Psychology 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSYC 101

A study of mental health and abnormal behavior. The topics covered include: definitions of mental health and mental illness; problems of adjustment; the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. Case studies supplement and illustrate the theoretical parts of the course material.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 13 Credits
 
Behavioral Sciences Elective (choose one) Credits:
PSYC 220 Child Psychology 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSYC 101

The study of human growth and development. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of children and how they change while passing through the major phases of growth. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and Special topics include: identification of conditions in personality development with an aim toward understanding the period of human growth on which adulthood is founded. Special topics include: identification of conditions in childhood leading to normal psychological development.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSYC 221 Human Development 3
The study of human growth and development. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of children and adolescents and how they change while passing through understanding the period of human growth on which the major phases of growth. Emphasis is placed on physical, emotional, and personality development with an aim toward understanding the period of human growth on which adulthood is founded.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSYC 223 Adolescent Psychology 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSYC 101

An introduction to the study of that portion of human development called adolescence. Some of the topics treated: significance of puberty, biological and social sex roles, adolescent image, the emergence of new figures such as practices and their replacement with new behavioral peers and idols, society at large as agents of socialization in place of parents and family, the extinction of old habits and practices and their replacement with new behavioral patterns. Theoretical consideration will be supplemented with observational experience.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PSYC 225 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PSYC 101

The study of human aging and changes during adulthood. This course is designed to give the student an understanding of early, middle, and later adulthood. Topics include physical changes, social-life changes, identity and interpersonal behavior, family life, and retirement, as well as the pathologies of old age.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3 Credits
 
Mathematics and Physics Credits:
MATH 161 Basic Applied Calculus 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 141 or TMAT 155 or Math Placement Exam

An introduction to calculus and its applications. Topics include functions, limits, the derivative, tangent line, the chain rule, maxima and minima, curve sketching, applications, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration by simple substitution, finding areas.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PHYS 140 Physics for Life Sciences I 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 141 or MATH 160 or MATH 161 or MATH 170 or TMAT 155.

Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: PHYS 141.

A basic course designed to meet the needs of health professions majors. Topics covered include vectors, laws of motion, work, energy, momentum, heat and wave motion. Illustrations from the field of life sciences will be stressed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-3
PHYS 141 Physics I Laboratory 1
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: PHYS 140

Laboratory course illustrating principles taught in the introductory physics for life sciences course, PHYS 140.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 0-2-1
    Total: 7 Credits
 
General Electives Credits:
Consult with advisor on any electives. 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
 
Science Electives Credits:
Consult with advisor on any electives. 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
 
Undergraduate Credits = 92

B.S./OTD students must complete the first year of the professional phase of the Doctor of Occupational Therapy program to be awarded the B.S.

Total Required Credits for B.S. Degree = 129