Chemistry, B.S.
Curriculum

Discovery Core

Foundations Credits:
FCWR 101 Writing I: Foundations of College Composition 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: WRIT 100 or Writing Placement Exam

A course introducing students to the fundamentals of college composition. Topics include writing process, rhetorical strategies, basics of critical reading and thinking, analytical writing, and argumentative writing. This course serves as a foundation to prepare students to succeed in other academic writing contexts. Coursework includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 151 Writing II: Foundations of Research Writing 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: FCWR 101 or WRIT 101

Further development of the academic writing, critical thinking, and analytical reading skills taught in Writing I. An introduction to academic discourse in the four core seminar areas: literature, social sciences, behavioral sciences, and philosophy. Development of library skills leading to a documented research paper.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSP 105 Foundations of Speech Communication 3
Study of the fundamentals of verbal communication including public speaking, interpersonal communication, and small group interaction. Training in methods of obtaining and organizing materials and ideas for effective verbal communication.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCIQ 101 Foundations of Inquiry 3
This course introduces you to the fundamentals of critical thinking. Topics include an overview of the research methods in various academic disciplines, reasoning, constructing an argument, and evaluating information. This course serves as a foundation for your continued development of critical thinking skills in other core classes, your major program coursework, and your personal and professional life.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSC 101 Foundations of Scientific Process 3
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the big ideas of different scientific disciplines, and is grounded in the scientific process. The course focuses on interdisciplinary aspects, the scientific process, and it is writing intensive, interactive and relevant.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 302 Communication for Healthcare Careers 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Building on courses taken in their majors, students will learn and apply concepts of effective written and oral expression appropriate for careers in the health and biology professions. In addition to closely examining a variety of texts across the discipline, students will develop public speaking skills while also learning to collaborate on grant proposals, literature reviews, pamphlets and posters, and a research paper. Topics covered include the rhetoric of writing in the health professions, ethics, images in the sciences, grant- and abstract writing, and researching and writing publishable manuscripts. Course work includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
—OR—
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
FCWR 304 Communication for Technical Professions 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Building on courses taken in their majors, students will learn and apply concepts of effective written and oral expression appropriate for careers in the technology professions, such as engineering and computer science. In addition to modes of technical discourse (definition, description, analysis, interpretation), this course emphasizes strategies for effective business communication in the technical professions and stylistics of technical communication. Methods and procedures of research are explored in depth. Course work includes a computer lab component, oral presentation of final reports using presentation software, and exploration of appropriate technology for technical communication.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 18 Credits
 
Seminars Credits:
ICBS 3XX Behavioral Science choice 3
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ICLT 3XX Literature choice 3
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ICPH 3XX Philosophy choice 3
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ICSS 3XX Social Science/Economics choice 3
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    Total: 12 Credits
 
Mathematics and Science Core Credits:
MATH 141 Precalculus 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 100 or MATH 101 or Math Placement Exam

A study of relations and functions; inequalities; complex numbers; quadratic equations; linear systems of equations; higher degree equations; trigonometric functions; identities; functions of composite angles; graphs of the trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; and binomial theorem. Note: A graphing calculator is used throughout the course.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
BIOL 110 General Biology I 4
The similarity in living things is demonstrated by a molecular and cellular approach to biology. After introductory biochemistry, the cell as the basic unit of life is studied structurally and metabolically. Life functions are examined from a cellular and from a vertebrate-organismic viewpoint. The central theme is the flow of energy between the biosphere and the ecosphere. The scientific method and hypothesis-testing are stressed as a means of investigation and forming conclusions. Collaborative laboratory assignments will include microscopic studies of the cell, its functions, and the dissection of a fetal pig.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 8 Credits
 

Major Requirements

Chemistry Credits:
CHEM 110 General Chemistry I 4
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 135 or TMAT 135, MATH 136 or TMAT 155, MATH 141, MATH 161, or MATH 170

An introduction to theoretical and inorganic chemistry. Studies include: types of matter, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, gas laws, and chemical calculations. Laboratory work illustrates common laboratory techniques as well as chemical principles.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
CHEM 150 General Chemistry II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 110

A continuation of CHEM 110. Topics to be covered include thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, acids and bases, ionic equilibria, oxidation-reduction reactions, and electrochemistry. Laboratory work illustrates the principles discussed in the lecture.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
CHEM 210 Organic Chemistry I 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 150

This course includes the study of the stereochemistry and electronic structure of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, and the properties of their functional groups. Laboratory work consists of the determination of physical constants and the preparation of various organic compounds.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
CHEM 250 Organic Chemistry II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 210

A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Studies include: the advanced theoretical treatment of reaction mechanisms, spectroscopic properties of organic compounds, and configurations of some important biological systems. Laboratory work consists of more advanced organic syntheses and qualitative organic analysis.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
CHEM 310 Quantitative Analysis 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 150

An introduction to the principles and calculations of quantitative analysis. Topics include: chemical stoichiometry, acid and base concepts, ionic equilibria, acid-base titrations, spectrophotometry, oxidation-reduction reactions, complex compounds, gravimetric analysis, and precipitation titrations .Laboratory work consists of elementary gravimetric, volumetric, and instrumental analysis.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-5-4
CHEM 350 Instrumental Analysis 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 310

This course represents a study of the operational principles and application of the instrumental methods for quantitative identification of compounds and determination of their chemical structure. Students will learn about principles involved in operation and data analysis for an array of modern laboratory instruments corresponding to electrochemical, spectrophotometric, and chromatographic methods. The key aspect of the class is for students to become knowledgeable of the scope of applicability as well as advantages and disadvantages of each method. The emphasis of this course is on learning the operational features and developing the insight that is necessary to choose the right tool to provide a quantitative solution to a given chemical problem.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
CHEM 395 Introduction to Research Design 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Any 300 level CHEM course

This course will provide you with an opportunity to explore scientific research and review articles in several areas of biomedical and chemical research and discuss: a) research design; b) experimental material and techniques; c) analysis, interpretation, presentation and critique of data/ results; d) statistical analyses; and e) improving your scientific writing and oral presentation skills. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/ or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
CHEM 410 Physical Chemistry I 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 310 and Co- requisite : MATH 170

A study of the fundamental principles of modern physical chemistry. Topics include: the kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics, thermochemistry, properties of solutions, and chemical kinetics. Laboratory work is designed to illustrate the fundamental laws and basic physicochemical methods.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-4
CHEM 450 Physical Chemistry II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 410,

Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 180

A continuation of Physical Chemistry I. Topics include: electrochemistry, chemical bonding, spectroscopy, photochemistry, physical biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work consists of electrode phenomena, spectrophotometric measurements, chemical catalysis, and radiochemistry.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
CHEM 493 Independent Research III 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite CHEM 395

An advanced biomedical project under the supervision of a faculty member.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-3
CHEM 494 Independent Research IV 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: CHEM 395

An advanced biomedical project under the supervision of a faculty member.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 42 Credits
 
Biology Credits:
BIOL 340 Biochemistry 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: BIOL 150 and CHEM 210. Life Sciences Osteopathy majors: Prerequisite BIOL 150 and co-requisite CHEM 210.

A practical introduction to the fundamentals of the structure and properties of the biomolecules in close context with their metabolism. Major emphasis is placed on the dynamic nature of biochemistry and the interrelationships of the various metabolic pathways that make up the totality of life. Work in the laboratory illustrates the more common biochemistry techniques and principles encountered in the lecture.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-3-4
    Total: 4 Credits
 
Mathematics Requirement Credits:
MATH 170 Calculus I 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 141 or TMAT 155 or Math Placement Exam

Study of lines and circles. Functions, limits, derivatives of algebraic functions, introduction to derivatives of trigonometric functions. Application of derivatives to physics problems, related rates, maximum-minimum word problems and curve sketching. Introduction to indefinite integrals. The conic sections.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
MATH 180 Calculus II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 170. Students in BS Electrical and Computer Engineering and BS Mechanical Engineering must earn a grade of C or better in MATH 170.

Riemann sums, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of the calculus. Area, volumes of solids of revolution, arc length, work. Exponential and logarithmic functions. Inverse trigonometric functions. Formal integration techniques. L'Hopital's rule, improper integrals. Polar coordinates.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
    Total: 8 Credits
 
Mathematics Elective (choose one) Credits:
MATH 235 Applied Statistics 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 150 or MATH 151 or MATH 170

An introduction to modern inferential statistics with appropriate applications to telecommunications and related fields. Major topics covered are descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sampling and the Central Limit Theorem, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, chi-square analysis and analysis of variance. The primary focus in this course will be on application of these statistical ideas and methods. Students will be required to conduct individual statistical projects involving the collection, organization and analysis of data.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
MATH 310 Linear Algebra 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 180

Matrices and systems of linear equations, vector spaces, change of base matrices, linear transformations, determinants, eigen-values and eigen-vectors, canonical forms.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3 Credits
 
Physics Credits:
PHYS 170 General Physics I 4
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 170

A basic course covering vectors, Newton's laws of motion, particle kinematics and dynamics, work, energy, momentum, and rotational motion.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-2-4
—OR—
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PHYS 175 General Physics for Pre-Med I 5
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 170

A basic course in physics for the student in the Combined Baccalaureate/Osteopathic Physician Program. Covers vectors, forces and torques, dynamics, energy momentum, fluids, gasses, liquids, solids, heat and thermodynamics.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-2-5
PHYS 180 General Physics II 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PHYS 170.

Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 180. Students in BS Electrical and Computer Engineering and BS Mechanical Engineering must earn a grade of C or better in PHYS 170.

A continuation of PHYS 170. Topics include fluids, wave motion, electric fields and electric potential, DC circuits, magnetic fields, capacitance and inductance, AC circuits, and electromagnetic waves.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-2-4
—OR—
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
PHYS 185 General Physics for Pre-Med II 5
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PHYS 175.

Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: MATH 180.

A continuation of PHYS 175. Includes waves, sound, light, optics, electricity, current, magnetism, instrumentation, atoms and nuclei.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-2-5
    Total: 8–10 Credits
 
General Electives Credits:
Consult with advisor on any electives choices 12
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Science Electives Credits:
Consult with advisor on any electives choices 9–12
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Total Required Credits = 124–127