Occupational Therapy

Name Title Credits School
OCTH 601 Community Health 3.00 School of Health Professions
This course is designed to introduce the student to basic community health concepts while developing fluency with medical terminology. Major topics include fundamentals of epidemiology, primary, secondary and tertiary prevention, chronic disease, maternal and child health, communicable disease, delivery systems, the medically underserved, healthcare shortage areas, health planning, and health personnel. Students carry out a simple community health project and present the project for class review. Periodic quizzes are used to evaluate progress in the mastery of medical terminology.

OCTH 602 Gross Anatomy 4.00 School of Health Professions
The overall objective of this course is the investigation of all major anatomical areas by region. The focus of the course is on musculoskeletal and neurological anatomy of the extremities, back, neck, and head. Lectures cover the anatomical structures to be dissected in the laboratory and address the organization, histological, and embryological development of the various regions. The functional anatomy of the musculoskeletal structures is emphasized. Specific instructions are provided to the student to encourage an efficient dissection.

OCTH 602L Gross Anatomy Laboratory 0.00 School of Health Professions
This course is a laboratory component of the lecture course. The overall objective of this course is the investigation of all major anatomical areas by region. The focus of the course is on musculoskeletal and neurological anatomy of the extremities, back, neck, and head. Lectures cover the anatomical structures to be dissected in the laboratory and address the organization, histological, and embryological development of the various regions. The functional anatomy of the musculoskeletal structures is emphasized. Specific instructions are provided to the student to encourage an efficient dissection.

OCTH 603 Human Physiology 3.00 School of Health Professions
Physiology is the study of function. A basic understanding of anatomy (the study of structure) is necessary in order to understand the physiology of the various organ systems of the human body. The physiological concepts learned in this course will allow a better understanding of pathophysiology and pharmacology. This course introduces basic principles of physiology starting at the cellular level (cell membrane physiology, membrane transport systems and receptor physiology). The course will include the physiology of the major organ systems of the body (musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, urinary, respiratory, nervous, gastrointestinal, and endocrine). Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-3-3

OCTH 604 Introduction to Occupational Therapy 3.00 School of Health Professions
Students will learn the history, philosophy and foundational theories of occupational therapy and its effects and significance on current practice. Students will also be introduced to the topics of professionalism, evidence based practice and ethics under current legislation within the field of occupational therapy. Official documents of the profession are presented as students learn about the various professional organizations and associations that support and promote the profession. The importance of professionalism, professional development, cultural sensitivity and ethics on the practice of occupational therapy are reinforced. This course will prepare students for subsequent coursework and fieldwork. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

OCTH 605L Occupational Therapy Theory I Laboratory 0.00 School of Health Professions
This course is a laboratory component of the lecture course. The student explores the history of occupational therapy and is introduced to theories of practice. The roles of the occupational therapist in practice are examined through readings, lectures, demonstrations, and classroom exercises that focus on professional communication, observation, and chart-reading skills. Laboratory sessions are designed to teach the student therapeutic application and analysis of activities. This course is for occupational therapy majors only.

OCTH 607 Childhood Development 2.00 School of Health Professions
This course introduces the student to theories and factors that influence human growth and development from birth through adolescence, and explores how these factors are embedded in the scope of occupational therapy. The student, through lectures, readings, observations, classroom exercises, and assignments, examines the elements that influence normal development in order to understand the role these factors play in occupational therapy practice. Topics includes prenatal development, reflexes, motor, musculoskeletal, cognitive and perceptual development.

OCTH 608 Adult Development & Geriatrics 2.00 School of Health Professions
This course introduces the students to age-related changes across adulthood in areas of social, cognitive, and physical functioning. Changes to occupational performance in daily activities, social roles and relationships, loss and death will be examined through the life span. Students will explore other concepts that affect functioning across the life span such as motivation, personality and stress.

OCTH 609 Psychosocial Studies 3.00 School of Health Professions
This course provides an exploration of psychosocial conditions in mental health occupational therapy practice. Focus is on the classification of mental disorders categorized in the DSM 5.

OCTH 611 Models of Practice 2.00 School of Health Professions
In this course students are introduced to the different models, theories, and frameworks that occupational therapists use during their practice. These models and frameworks guide the therapist during the occupational therapy process from data collection, assessment, and intervention planning. Students also will learn the concepts of occupational science and its relation to occupational therapy practice.

OCTH 612 Conditions in Pediatrics 3.00 School of Health Professions
This course will provide an overview of pathological conditions commonly encountered in the practice of pediatric occupational therapy. The course will cover the clinical presentation of pathological conditions, prognosis, diagnostics, medical treatment interventions, and the implications for the occupational therapy provider. The student, through lectures, readings, observations, classroom exercises, and assignments, examines the elements that influence and hinder development in order to understand the role these factors play in occupational therapy practice. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

OCTH 613 Neuroscience 3.00 School of Health Professions
This is an introduction to the science of the nervous system for the physical and occupational therapist that provides the basic understanding of the anatomy of the nervous system and its function. A review of the histology and embryology of the major divisions of the nervous system is followed by a systems approach to the study of the special senses, cognition, and psychological and motor functions. Functional aspects of neuroscience are explored through examples of common neurological clinical problems in order to provide a solid foundation for planning therapeutic interventions.

OCTH 614 Physical Conditions in Adults 3.00 School of Health Professions
This course will provide an overview of pathological conditions commonly encountered in the practice of occupational therapy with adults. The course will cover the clinical presentation of pathological conditions, prognosis, diagnostics, medical treatment interventions, and the implications for the occupational therapy provider. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

OCTH 615 Kinesiology 4.00 School of Health Professions
Kinesiology is the study of human motion as applied to evaluation of joint motion and muscle function. Palpation of joints, bony prominences, and muscles as well as manual muscle testing, range of motion, and goniometry skills will be addressed.

OCTH 615L Kinesiology Laboratory 0.00 School of Health Professions
This course is a laboratory component of the lecture course. Kinesiology is the study of human motion as applied to evaluation of joint motion and muscle function. Palpation of joints, bony prominences, and muscles as well as manual muscle testing, range of motion, and goniometry skills will be addressed.

OCTH 617 Occupation & Task Analysis 2.00 School of Health Professions
This course introduces students to the concept of occupation and the role of occupation as the philosophical underpinning of the profession of occupational therapy. Task and activity analysis are also explored and the student will begin to analyze human activity for the purpose of facilitating occupational performance. Lecture, class discussions, readings, written and oral assignments, laboratory exercise and online discussions are used to facilitate learning. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 1-2-2

OCTH 625 Group Process 2.00 School of Health Professions
Through lectures, demonstrations, and classroom exercises, the student explores the structure, function, and theories of group process as used by the occupational therapist. Major topics include theories of group leadership, functional roles, cohesion, goals and norms, group development, and skills required for therapeutic use of group dynamics. Students will design a group protocol and conduct a session for classroom critique and analysis. For occupational therapy majors only.

OCTH 640 OT Research Design I 2.00 School of Health Professions
This entry-level course introduces the students to the foundations of clinical research including evidence-based practice and the research process. Specific skills of reading the literature, retrieving evidence, forming a clinical and a research question, sampling, principles of measurement, and types of quantitative and qualitative research will be introduced and tested throughout the course. Mastery of these skills will be tested through individual and group assignments as well as quizzes and exams.

OCTH 655L Occupational Theory II Laboratory 0.00 School of Health Professions
This course is a laboratory component of the lecture course. In this course, which is a continuation of Occupational Therapy Theory I, the student is introduced to clinical skills as they relate to theories of practice. The student examines tools of practice, including therapeutic use of self, problem identification, and problem solving. Laboratory exercises focus on more complex activities, as well as on therapeutic and environmental adaptations as applied to more advanced case material.

OCTH 660 Psychosocial Studies II 3.00 School of Health Professions
The course is a continuation of OCTH 610 Psychosocial Studies I and focuses on frames of reference as they influence evaluation and intervention with clients whose psychosocial deficits impact performance. The students become familiar with evaluation strategies and intervention planning with more complex clinical material. Fieldwork I assignments are the setting for exploration of clinical skills and of the ethical and social issues associated with mental health practice.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: OCTH 610

OCTH 665 Pathophysiology 3.00 School of Health Professions
Basic physiological mechanisms and principles involved in the development of illness are related to the origins of specific lesions, dysfunctions, and specific diseases. Topics include the role of microbial infections in disorders of the immune system, nutritional factors to disorders of the vascular system and heart, the origin and effect of tumors, and the study of genetic dysfunctions. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in the common diseases of organs and organ systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, hematopoietic, etc.) are reviewed.

OCTH 690 Fieldwork II: Psychosocial 3.00 School of Health Professions
This is the first of two 12-week, full-time clinical experiences that guide the student in meeting increasingly complex challenges at community sites that meet the selection criteria of the American Occupational Therapy Association. These challenges are designed to provide learning experiences that foster professional competence and personal growth in the transition from student to clinician. The populations in these settings are persons with psychosocial impairments or deficits who are in need of occupational therapy intervention.

OCTH 705 Occupational Therapy Theory III: Physical Disabilities  3.00 School of Health Professions
The student is guided in an exploration of the professional literature relating to intervention for persons with physical disabilities in order to become familiar with frames of reference that guide the occupational therapist in practice. Laboratory sessions are devoted to advanced activity analysis and the application of activity to intervention. Students are introduced to practice guidelines that relate to applications and precautions associated with the clinical application and fabrication of simple static orthotic devices.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: OCTH 655

OCTH 705L Occupational Theory III Laboratory 0.00 School of Health Professions
This course is a laboratory component of the lecture course. The student is guided in an exploration of the professional literature relating to intervention for persons with physical disabilities in order to become familiar with frames of reference that guide the occupational therapist in practice. Laboratory sessions are devoted to advanced activity analysis and the application of activity to intervention. Students are introduced to practice guidelines that relate to applications and precautions associated with the clinical application and fabrication of simple static orthotic devices.

OCTH 707 Occupational Therapy Assessment in Pediatrics 3.00 School of Health Professions
This course will provide an overview of assessment methods, screenings and tools that are used within the practice of pediatric settings. Drawing on foundations of study in anatomy, kinesiology, Development of the Child and Physical Conditions of the Child, students will learn to engage in clinical reasoning skills drawing from a variety of theoretical perspectives as they learn how to select and implement assessments based on the specific diagnosis, presentation and functional complaints of the child. Level 1 pediatric experience, case studies and videos will be utilized to reflect current pediatric occupational therapy practice. In addition, hands on learning activities will integrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes important for established and emerging areas of pediatric occupational therapy. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-3-3

OCTH 709 OT Assessment in Psychosocial Disorders/Lab 3.00 School of Health Professions
The OT Assessment in Psychosocial Disorders/Lab course builds on the Psychosocial Disorders course and expands learning on theory, frames of reference, and evidence based practice as they influence evaluation, screening and assessment with clients whose psychosocial deficits impact performance. Students learn assessment strategies and outcome measure tools essential for client-centered intervention planning. Students begin to utilize beginning clinical reasoning skills as they explore ethical, cultural, social and political factors associated with mental health practice. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-3-3

OCTH 710 Pediatric Occupational Therapy 3.00 School of Health Professions
Through lectures, readings, classroom exercises, and level I fieldwork experiences, the student explores the impact of abnormal development, pathology, trauma, abuse, and neglect on the child's functional status. There is a review of pediatric disorders, with an emphasis on central nervous system and musculoskeletal development, cognition and perception. Prevention and early intervention strategies are reviewed.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: OCTH 690

OCTH 714 Assessments in Physical Dysfunction 3.00 School of Health Professions
This class will provide an overview of assessment methods, screenings, and tools that are used within the practice of physical disabilities settings. Students will learn to engage in clinical reasoning skills as they learn how to select and implement assessments based on the specific diagnosis, presentation, and functional complaints of the client. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-3-3

OCTH 715 Pharmacology 3.00 School of Health Professions
The fundamentals of medical pharmacology, with implications for the practice of occupational and physical therapy, are reviewed through lectures and readings. Presentations include the principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Specifically stressed are drugs affecting the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, renal, nervous, respiratory, endocrine, and gastrointestinal systems. Medical reasons for drug treatment, specific actions, therapeutic, side effects, and adverse reactions are reviewed in the context of clinical practice. Problems related to polypharmacy, especially in the geriatric and psychiatric populations, will be emphasized. Particular attention will be given to those prescription drugs affecting motor control, movement function, cardiovascular function, psychopharmacotherapeutics, and neurological impairments.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: OCTH 665 or PHTH 665

OCTH 725 Assistive Technology, Environmental Modifications 3.00 School of Health Professions
The student, through lectures, assigned readings, and laboratory sessions, will learn to define adaptive and assistive technology, to identify adaptive equipment, and to describe adaptive and assistive equipment options for a variety of deficits and populations. The student will be guided in the selection of technology applications to assist clients in mobility, communication, personal care, work, play, and educational pursuits. Sensorimotor, cognitive, and psychological components are considered in terms of their impact on the utilization of assistive technology.

Corequisite Course(s): Co-requisite: OCTH 705

OCTH 725L Assistive Technology, Environmental Modifications Laboratory 0.00 School of Health Professions
This course is a laboratory component of the lecture course. The student, through lectures, assigned readings, and laboratory sessions, will learn to define adaptive and assistive technology, to identify adaptive equipment, and to describe adaptive and assistive equipment options for a variety of deficits and populations. The student will be guided in the selection of technology applications to assist clients in mobility, communication, personal care, work, play, and educational pursuits. Sensorimotor, cognitive, and psychological components are considered in terms of their impact on the utilization of assistive technology.

OCTH 735 Health Promotion 2.00 School of Health Professions
The Health Promotion course is designed to introduce the student to community and public health topics and trends. Major topics include fundamentals of epidemiology, primary, secondary and tertiary prevention, chronic disease, health disparities, injury, violence, population health, delivery systems, program planning, and program evaluation. Students will identify local, national and global health policies and initiatives that meet individual, community and organizational needs. Students learn to apply health promotion theories, models and evidence based practice strategies in developing and implementing innovative health promotion initiatives that meet the diverse needs of individuals across the lifespan. Students apply therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning skills based on ethical, cultural, social and political factors in carrying out a community health project which aligns with and meets community and societal needs. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

OCTH 736 Administration and Leadership 3.00 School of Health Professions


OCTH 744 Upper Extremity and Hand Therapy 4.00 School of Health Professions
This class will provide an overview of assessment methods, screenings, and tools that are used within the practice of physical disabilities settings. Students will learn to engage in clinical reasoning skills as they learn how to select and implement assessments based on the specific diagnosis, presentation, and functional complaints of the client. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-3-4

OCTH 750 Interventions in Physical Disabilities 3.00 School of Health Professions
This class will teach the student to develop the clinical reasoning skills needed to develop and implement client centered interventions to meet the needs of clients within the physical disabilities setting. Intervention topics will address diverse medical conditions and will cover a wide range of treatment approaches including neurorehabilitation, manual therapy, and the use of assistive technology. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-3-3

OCTH 755 Occupational Therapy Theory IV: Clinical Skills for Physical Dysfunction 3.00 School of Health Professions
The student, through lectures, assigned readings of clinical papers and texts, and laboratory exercises, explores the scientific rationale for the selection of strategies used by the occupational therapist in working with the physically disabled adult. Areas of focus include a review of the tools of practice (i.e., therapeutic use of self, group dynamics, activities, problem solving, and therapeutic adaptations). The student practices clinical writing skills, including assessments, planning, progress notes, and discharge plans. In laboratory sessions, the student learns various methods for fabrication and the mechanical principles of design and construction of complex, dynamic splints as well as advanced environmental adaptations.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: OCTH 705

OCTH 755L Occupational Theory IV Laboratory 0.00 School of Health Professions
This course is a laboratory component of the lecture course. The student, through lectures, assigned readings of clinical papers and texts, and laboratory exercises, explores the scientific rationale for the selection of strategies used by the occupational therapist in working with the physically disabled adult. Areas of focus include a review of the tools of practice (i.e., therapeutic use of self, group dynamics, activities, problem solving, and therapeutic adaptations). The student practices clinical writing skills, including assessments, planning, progress notes, and discharge plans. In laboratory sessions, the student learns various methods for fabrication and the mechanical principles of design and construction of complex, dynamic splints as well as advanced environmental adaptations.

OCTH 760 Gerontology-Occupational Therapy Intervention With the Elderly 3.00 School of Health Professions
The student, through lectures, assigned readings, and Level I Fieldwork experiences, becomes familiar with the significance of physical, social, and psychological aspects of aging on therapeutic intervention in occupational therapy practice. Goals of the course include mastery of occupational therapy theories of geriatric rehabilitation and an understanding of intervention contexts, including home care, day care, hospice, acute and long-term care centers, and community living. Assessment and intervention strategies are reviewed in the classroom and applied in fieldwork settings under professional supervision.

OCTH 770 Occupational Therapy Research II 2.00 School of Health Professions
Lectures, classroom discussion, and assigned text and journal readings guide the student in the development of an understanding of the application of advanced statistical techniques to occupational therapy research. Specific application of research methodology is employed in the completion of a research proposal of a significant problem to be investigated. Informed consent, treatment of human subjects, the Institutional Review Board, and proper reference citations are reviewed. (Cross-listed as PHTH 710.)

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: OCTH 720

OCTH 790 Fieldwork II: Physical Disabilities 3.00 School of Health Professions
This is the second of two 12-week full-time clinical experiences designed to foster professional clinical competence and growth. Under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist, the student works with clients whose primary problems are in the area of physical disabilities. Responsibility for evaluation, assessment and intervention is gradually increased as the student demonstrates professional growth in the application of theory to practice.

OCTH 799 OT Interventions in Psychosocial & Group Process 3.00 School of Health Professions
The OT Interventions in Psychosocial & Group Process course advances learning from the OT Assessment in Psychosocial Disorders course and builds on evaluation, screening and assessment methods with clients whose psychosocial deficits impact performance. Students develop and implement client-centered interventions based on areas of occupation for both individual and group settings. Students explore group dynamics and the structure, function, and theories of group process as used by the occupational therapist. Students apply therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning skills based on ethical, cultural, social and political factors which influence mental health treatment and therapeutic interventions for group practice. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-3-3

OCTH 805 Occupational Therapy Theory V: Advanced Clinical Practice 4.00 School of Health Professions
Lectures, assigned textbook and journal readings, and seminar sessions are designed to guide the student in an exploration of advanced clinical topics, including attitudinal and communication issues in clinical practice, professional behavior, self-assessment, practice in the medical marketplace, and sub-specialty areas for the occupational therapist, including role of complementary and alternative medicine. Classroom exercises assist the student in developing strategies for professional conflict resolution, time management, and problem solving. Laboratory sessions focus on the analysis and application of complex activities designed for goal attainment. The student is introduced to information regarding licensure procedures and the certification examination.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: OCTH 790

OCTH 805L Occupational Theory V Laboratory 0.00 School of Health Professions
This course is a laboratory component of the lecture course. Lectures, assigned textbook and journal readings, and seminar sessions are designed to guide the student in an exploration of advanced clinical topics, including attitudinal and communication issues in clinical practice, professional behavior, self-assessment, practice in the medical marketplace, and sub-specialty areas for the occupational therapist, including role of complementary and alternative medicine. Classroom exercises assist the student in developing strategies for professional conflict resolution, time management, and problem solving. Laboratory sessions focus on the analysis and application of complex activities designed for goal attainment. The student is introduced to information regarding licensure procedures and the certification examination.

OCTH 820 Occupational Therapy Research III 3.00 School of Health Professions
This course is designed as a follow-up to OCTH 735 Occupational Therapy Research Design II. In class sessions, the student explores current research issues in occupational therapy, including the ethics of the use of human subjects, institutional review boards, current research trends, funding sources, and the skills required for preparation, presentation, and sharing of research material to a group. The student, working with a faculty mentor, organizes, prepares, and presents an original research project. (Required thesis binding is at the student's expense.)

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: OCTH 770

OCTH 825 Occupational Science 3.00 School of Health Professions
Lectures, classroom discussion, and textbook and journal readings are designed to develop an in-depth understanding of occupational science as a foundation for practice. Topics covered include historical roots of occupational science in the practice of occupational therapy, various definitions of occupation, and the application of systems theory to practice. The impact of the seminal works of Bateson, Kielhofner, Christiansen, and Clark are reviewed to explore their influence on occupational therapy practice.

Corequisite Course(s): Co-requisite: OCTH 805

OCTH 830 Motor Learning and Development 2.00 School of Health Professions
The student reviews current theories of learning as they relate to motor skills by tracing normal development from embryo to old age. Topics covered through lectures and assigned readings include research, theory, and evaluation of gross and fine motor development as influenced by perception, vision, auditory, kinesthetic, and cognition. The impact of motor dysfunction on growth, and development, and learning is explored in the context of the clinical setting. (Cross­listed as PHTH 630.)

OCTH 835 Occupational Therapy for Cognitive and Perceptual Deficits 2.00 School of Health Professions
Classroom lectures, discussions, and assigned text book and journal readings are planned to develop theoretical knowledge and clinical skills in the practice of occupational therapy with populations who present with cognitive and/or perceptual deficits. Theoretical approaches, clinical reasoning, evaluation, and intervention strategies are reviewed. Perceptual/cognitive topics covered include memory, learning, executive functions, the apraxias, agnosias, and unilateral neglect.

Corequisite Course(s): Co-requisite: OCTH 805

OCTH 850 Clinical Reasoning and Professional Development 2.00 School of Health Professions
The Clinical Reasoning and Professional Development course enables students to reflect, analyze, critique, and build upon their knowledge and experience from level II fieldwork, in order to expand their capacity to provide occupational therapy services which align with the scope and vision of the profession. Students learn to develop interpersonal and professional skills essential for practicing as a beginning level occupational therapist. Students identify their strengths and growth areas related to clinical reasoning and clinical competency in preparation for board certification and practice. Emphasis on local, national, and global service delivery enables students to expand their possibilities in choosing career options in traditional and emerging practice areas. Students apply prior learning based on evidence and ethical, cultural, social and political factors and develop a plan for success. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-0-2

OCTH 851 Specialized Topics in Hand Therapy 2.00 School of Health Professions
This class will prepare the student to apply advanced concepts of hand and upper extremity rehabilitation to a variety of orthopedic, traumatic and neurological diagnoses. Content will focus on advanced topics in the field of specialized upper extremity rehabilitation including evaluation, orthosis analysis, implementation of therapeutic exercises, Students will engage in critical thinking and clinical reasoning as they apply concepts of upper extremity rehabilitation to various case studies. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-0-2

OCTH 852 Specialized Topics in Pediatrics 2.00 School of Health Professions
This class will prepare the student to apply advanced concepts and to utilize evidenced based practice within the area of pediatrics. Content will focus on areas of practice, frames of reference and interventions within the field of pediatrics including sensory integration, constraint induced movement therapy, infant child feeding and swallowing, early intervention and school based therapy. Students will engage in critical thinking and reasoning as they apply these concepts to various case studies. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-0-2

OCTH 853 Specialized Topics in Neuro-rehabilitation 2.00 School of Health Professions
This class will prepare the student to apply advanced concepts of neuro-rehabilitation to a variety of neurological diagnoses. Content will focus on advanced topics in the field of neuro-rehabilitation including motor learning and control, cognition and perception, vision rehabilitation, vestibular rehabilitation, and concussion rehabilitation. Students will engage in critical thinking and clinical reasoning as they apply concepts of neuro-rehabilitation to various case studies. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-0-2

OCTH 890 Fieldwork II: Specialization 2.00 School of Health Professions
This is the third of three professionally supervised full-time fieldwork assignments. Students are assigned to selected practice settings for eight weeks, full-time, in a specialized area. The student selects an area of interest from among a number of specialties, including, but not limited to, hand therapy, spinal cord injury, environmental adaptations, ergonomics, neurology, developmental disabilities, acute care, home care, vestibular dysfunction, rehabilitation of the blind, hearing impaired, and services to persons with disabling social problems such as the addictions, long-term unemployment, poverty, criminal behavior, and long-term dependence.

OCTH 895 Fieldwork II A 3.00 School of Health Professions
After satisfactory completion of the didactic courses, the student will begin the first of two clinical education placements that can take place in a variety of settings, (e.g. psychosocial, pediatrics, adult rehabilitation, geriatrics, etc.) that meet the selection criteria of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). Fieldwork Level II A is 12 weeks, full time and is designed to foster continued professional clinical competence and growth under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist. The student is expected to increase skill level at progressively higher levels of performance with the goal of developing entry level practitioner skills by the completion of the fieldwork experience.

OCTH 896 Fieldwork II B 3.00 School of Health Professions
Level II B is a 12 week full time fieldwork experience that occurs following the satisfactory completion of the first Level IIA fieldwork experience. This experience is designed to foster continued professional clinical competence and growth. Students will be placed in a variety of settings, (e.g. psychosocial, pediatrics, adult rehabilitation, geriatrics, etc.) that meet the selection criteria of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), although the setting will be different from the initial placement. The student is expected to increase skill level at progressively higher levels of performance with the goal of developing entry level practitioner skills by the completion of the fieldwork experience.

OCTH 899 Specialty Fieldwork 2.00 School of Health Professions
Level II B is a 12 week full time fieldwork experience that occurs following the satisfactory completion of the first Level IIA fieldwork experience. This experience is designed to foster continued professional clinical competence and growth. Students will be placed in a variety of settings, (e.g. psychosocial, pediatrics, adult rehabilitation, geriatrics, etc.) that meet the selection criteria of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), although the setting will be different from the initial placement. The student is expected to increase skill level at progressively higher levels of performance with the goal of developing entry level practitioner skills by the completion of the fieldwork experience. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 0-2-2