History

Name Title Credits School
HIST 110 American History I 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This is a survey course of American history from the colonial period, the Revolution to the establishment of the Republic, the first half of the 19th century, up through the period of the Civil War, ending in 1865. The impact of geography on the growth of the Republic is considered. The political, economic, and cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the student with historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present-day issues.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

HIST 150 American History II 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This is a survey course of American history from the end of the Civil War to the present: the period of the Reconstruction, the industrialization of the United States, the emergence of the country as a Great Power, U.S. role in the twentieth century are considered. The political, economic, and cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the student with historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present day issues.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

HIST 170 History of the State of New York 1.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This one credit course is a survey of the political, economic and social history of the state of New York beginning with its colonial history. Special attention will be paid to the legacy of the American Indians, such as the Iroquois confederacy, the early Dutch settlers of the colonial period, the industrial growth of the state, the emergence of New York as the financial center of the world, and New York state's role in national politics.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-0-1

HIST 210 The Contemporary World 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This is a survey course of 20th century global history; it covers the period of imperialism leading to World War I, the emergence of the U.S.S.R. as a major power, the transformation of Europe as a result of World War II, the period of the Cold War, the role of the U.S. in the post-cold war world. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of geography, science and technology on political, economic and cultural development of the world.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

HIST 220 African American Experience 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
A survey of the role of African American people in American history from African beginnings to the present time. Topics include: African American response to the major political, social and economic changes in America; the contributions of outstanding African American to American history; the interaction of the African American and majority environments; and the black movements that help shape African American consciousness.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

HIST 230 Survey of Jewish History 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
A survey of the life of the Jewish people from their beginnings in the Near East to the mid-20th century. Attention is focused on major migrations, leading personalities, and historic movements.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

HIST 240 History of Technology 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
The history of Western technology is surveyed with emphasis on technological change since the Industrial Revolution. Attention is given to both the positive and the negative aspects of technological change. The various interrelationships among technological change and other aspects of history are highlighted, as is the phenomenon of the geometrical progression of technological changes.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

HIST 310 Seminar in History 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
Selected topics in history.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 300 Core Seminar in Soc. Science 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
In this Core social science seminar, students will focus on a specific topic in history, political science, or economics. In addition, the course will examine the social sciences in relation to other disciplines. The content of the course will vary from semester to semester.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take FCIQ 101, FCSC 101, and one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 301 Environmental History 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
Environmental history is an interdisciplinary seminar that explores topics such as Native American environmental practices, colonialism and the environment, the Industrial Revolution, nineteenth and twentieth century environmentalism, suburbanization and post-industrial societies, socialism and the developing world, and scholarly debates over environmental history.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 303 The American Character: A Global Perspective 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This seminar will explore five features of the "American Character" from a global perspective. The course will examine historical and contemporary developments, which include the twenty-first century and beyond.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 304 Great Cities Past and Present 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
Great Cities is an interdisciplinary history seminar that explores selected big cities to see how human beings, across the globe, have coped with the pressures of urbanization. The different case study cities are grouped into themes that illustrate varieties of urban growth. The interrelationship of time with money, power, social patterns, and urban design will be explored in each of these examples.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 305 Vietnam Through Film 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course critically examines the Roots of the Vietnam War, the United States involvement in the war, the Antiwar Movement and its impact on the war, and finally, the lessons learned from this experience. We will examine both the experiences of Americans and the Vietnamese soldiers who fought in what is now termed the Second Indochina War.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 306 Modern New York 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This seminar course considers the ways in which New York has been rebuilt and redefined by people and institutions since the late nineteenth century. Topics include: Wall Street and trusts; Gilded Age politics; water, parks, and mass transportation; apartment houses, tenements, and housing reform; class warfare and the labor movement; fine arts and popular amusements; national mass culture and the 1920s boom; Depression and Fiorello La Guardia; Robert Moses and urban renewal; suburbanization; the urban crisis; the new immigrants; globalization and post-industrial reform.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 307 Seminar in Economic Crises 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
During 2008 and 2009 the world economy, grappling with the subprime mortgage problem, faced its deepest economic downturn since the 1930's. As a result of this crisis, how the macro economy works and the future shape of capitalism is in heated debate among economists. This course will analyze what is now called "The Great Recession," looking at its possible causes and long-term consequences. A number of alternative views are discussed based on ideas and theories developed by economists going back to the Classic School in the 19th century to the more current view of Keynesian and monetarist economists. A comparison between the current crisis and the Great Depression and other cyclical downtowns is made.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 308 Seminar in Economics of Sustainable Growth 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course examines issues involved in sustainable development. The significant contribution that economic analysis can make in understanding the nature of problems in sustainable development and in providing possible solutions is the central focus of the course. The role that economic and political institutions play in allocating natural resources is examined. Students are exposed to a number of emerging sustainability issues including global warming and given ample opportunities to develop their own perspective.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 309 Technology and Global Issues 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
In this course the relationships between technology and global concerns are explored. Topics such as sustainable development, standards, ethics, environmental concerns and public policies related to design and development, energy, transportation, air and water facing both developed and developing nations will be discussed. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161). Course is limited to juniors and seniors.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 310 The Modern Middle East: A Global Perspective 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course will explore the complex relationship the Middle East maintains in world affairs. Some topics include: the struggle against Western domination and influence, the transformation of the period (1908-1923), Turkey's rise to a secular state, the rise of nationalism, the rise of Islam, Islamic Renewal, Egypt as the forefront of women's liberation in the region, the role of the Arab/Islamic woman, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the struggle for Palestine, and the oil factor.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take FCIQ 101, FCSC 101, and one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 311 Sem in Conspiracy Theory: The Assassination of JFK 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course examines why the American people have a penchant to believe in conspiracies and looks at the history of the conspiracy theory in the U.S. from the Salem Witch Trials to the belief that 9/11 was not put in motion by Osama Bin Laden, but, instead, by the U.S. Government itself. From there, the course looks at the "Mother of all conspiracy theories", the assassination of JFK. The Kennedy assassination will be examined through the literature of the event, through film, and through the scholarship of the students themselves.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 312 Revolution! Theory, History, and Culture Culture 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course will explore the complex origins, evolution and nature of political revolutions in the modern world. Using an intensive interdisciplinary approach that synthesizes political theory, historical sociology, primary historical documents, literature, journalism and visual arts, the course will examine both the form and content of revolutions from various, and at times opposing, analytical frameworks with the purpose of ultimately determining if there exists one paramount model for defining, classifying and predicting a revolution.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take FCIQ 101, FCSC 101, and one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 313 Seminar on Islamic Society and Civilization to 1830 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course is dedicated to an analytical approach to some of the most important elements in the rise, flourishing, and the decline of the Islamic society and culture in its first 1200 years of history. Highlights from its scientific, artistic, architectural renovations will be studied in detail, while the landmark events in its history and general social and economic experience will be identified and analyzed.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take FCIQ 101, FCSC 101, and one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 314 Seminar on Global Conflict 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course is an analytical approach to some of the most important elements in natural human rivalries that lead to conflict. It will distinguish three distinct types of conflict and, using the current trends, postulates on future prospects of each type of conflict: symmetrical, asymmetrical and economic.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take FCIQ 101, FCSC 101, and one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111), Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161), and Group 3 (FCSP 105 or SPCH 105)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

ICSS 315 Filming American History 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This seminar explores American history through a combination of cutting-edge readings in American history (including both new research and primary documents) with classic and contemporary film interpretations of American social history topics. Topics to be covered in the course include the rise and fall of big cities and the labor movement; the 1920's and 30's; 1950's suburbia; Cold War; the Civil Rights movement; the women's movement; the gay rights movement; deindustrialization; and the rise of social conservatism.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 110 American Government and Politics 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course is an introduction to the processes of the American form of democratic government; the nature and structure of U.S. government; its chief characteristics and functions. Special attention is paid to the intimate relation and mutual impact of government and the people on each other, expanding the students' awareness of the effects of governmental decisions on the American people.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 210 Comparative Government 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
An introduction to comparative political structures and institutions covering the major European governments as well as non-Western political systems.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 220 History of Political Thought 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
A study of the historical and theoretical underpinnings to current political ideologies, starting with the Greek city state and the political theories of Plato and Aristotle, continuing with the Roman, Medieval and Renaissance contributions to political thought and culminating in the radical political theories of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 230 International Relations 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
A systematic analysis of national goals and determinants, the basis of national power, sources of international conflict. The uses of power: balance of power and the balance of terror. Diplomacy, collective security, and international organizations will also be explored.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 240 Basic Legal Concepts and Administration of Justice 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course covers the judicial process and its evolution, the rights of accused persons, and the administration of justice in the light of the elementary foundations and functions of substantive and adjective law. The theoretical aspects of basic concepts will be examined, but the stress will be on the practical aspects.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 305 Politics and Society 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
The fundamental concepts of the state, government, and their interrelationships. Topics include: the state as an instrument of social control; power, its legitimacy and authority; political doctrines such as democracy, oligarchy, and totalitarianism; the modern state and its political structures, elites, and decision makers; the electoral process and sociopolitical means of attitudinal influence. The impact of class, status, and influence will also be analyzed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 310 Politics of Change 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course is concerned with the impact of modernization on the political system; the relationship between modernization and decolonization, revolution and nation-building; theories of political change; and the consequences of modernization as experienced by several countries from the First, Second, and Third Worlds.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: PSCI 110

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 315 American Society and Judicial Behavior 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course covers changing values and patterns of judicial behavior, federal courts and the power of judicial review, fundamental constitutional principles, nationalization and enforcement of the Bill of Rights, the Supreme Court's policy-making role and its effect on economic policy, and the controversy over the arbiter role of the court. Included will be an analysis of constitutional development of rights and duties of the people, and the role of the government as an institution.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: PSCI 110

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 320 Foreign Policy of the United States 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
The historical development of American policy, the mechanics of its formulation, and its current objectives will be studied, discussed, and analyzed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 325 Public Administration 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This is a study of the nature and scope of public administration: principles, societal protection, assistance to various groups, governmental proprietary enterprises, and regulation of business. Bureaucratic organization administration relationships. Policy making and implementation will be closely examined: unit specialization, organization coordination, centralization, planning, efficiencies, and control.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 350 Government and Metropolitan Problems 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
The first part comprises the political framework: state governmental structure, its functions, services, and financing; local, rural, and urban governments, their structures, services, and functions. The second half focuses on metropolitan problems and their interaction with metropolitan government; housing, schooling, transportation, sanitation, pollution, and taxation. Social parameters stemming from ethnic, religious, class, and employment factors, among others, will be interwoven in the analysis.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: PSCI 110

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 355 Government and Business 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
A consideration of relationships between business enterprise and the societal and political milieu in which these enterprises operate. New concepts in business ethics and corporate responsibility. Government regulation of business activity.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: PSCI 110

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 360 International Law and Organization 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
The nature of international law; the organization of the community of nations; the United Nations system; the regional organizations of the bloc type; the substantive rules of international law; procedures for the pacific settlement of international disputes; international and social cooperation; and prospects for a development system of world order through international organization.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 365 Public Policy Analysis 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This course will approach public policy decisions to determine goal achievement in terms of need articulation, relative costs and expended resources, planning and programming for future needs, and resource development.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3

PSCI 390 Research Topics in Political Science 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences


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PSCI 410 Seminar in Government and Politics 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences


Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits:

PSCI 470 Political Science Internship 3.00 College of Arts & Sciences
This internship is designed to offer the student an opportunity to combine academic preparation with practical political experience under the joint supervision of cooperating personnel and faculty members. This course may be repeated.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3