Architecture

Name Title Credits School
ARCH 601 M. ARCH Studio 1 6.00 School of Arch & Design
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of design and visual communication for architects. Focused objective exercises in two and three dimensional design build on one another in increasing complexity. There is an emphasis on critical design thinking, drawing conventions, and modeling techniques.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Admission to the M.ARCH program Corequisite: ARCH 611, ARCH 641, ARCH 661

ARCH 602 M. ARCH Studio 2 6.00 School of Arch & Design
This studio builds on the introductory design skills acquired in ARCH 601. Students continue to develop critical design thinking skills and a language of effective visual communication through the fabrication of drawings and physical models. The theme of this studio is the examination of the anatomy of architecture through the critical analysis of canonical precedents. The first part of the semester is devoted to in-depth analysis of canonical buildings. The second part involves the students in devising a design intervention that engages the studied precedent. All exercises consider the translation of spatial concepts into physical design proposals. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-6-6

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH-601, Corequisite: ARCH-681

ARCH 603 M. ARCH Studio 3 6.00 School of Arch & Design
Students will explore the themes of public architecture, public space and public infrastructure through research, travel, and studio projects. This summer semester, between the first and second years of the M.ARCH, is provides students with a deeper understanding of canonical and examples of architecture and urbanism embedded within the cultures where they were realized and used. Emphasis is placed on first-hand observation, on-site documentation and in-depth research augmented by local experts. A studio project provides a vehicle for students to explore, summarize and synthesize new knowledge. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-6-6

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite : ARCH 602 Corequisite: ARCH Elective

ARCH 607 Option Studio 5.00 School of Arch & Design
Students choosing this option will work in teams of three to four people to produce design and design development documents for a project of medium complexity. Modeling techniques to document and organize their work. They will understand local and international building codes to address zoning and site related issues respect to building massing, schematic design, and design development including egress, fire rating, construction and ADA requirements. Standards of professional practice will be referenced through the use of the AIA Agreement between the Owner/Architect B141 as a course organizing document. In addition documents will be expected to integrate structure, mechanical, electrical, HVAC and materials strategies into their design. Sustainable practices will be emphasized through reference to LEED and other evolving standards throughout the semester

ARCH 611 Introduction to Structures & Technology 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course introduces the basic theoretical trajectory of structures and architectural technology and its simulation of the built environment. Architectural "elements" and "assemblies" are explored abstractly in terms of their structural, material, and environmental concerns. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: Accepted into the Master of Architecture program Corequiste: ARCH 601

ARCH 621 Building Systems I 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course introduces the basic theoretical trajectory of structures and architectural technology and its simulation of the built environment. Architectural "elements" and "assemblies" are explored abstractly in terms of their structural, material, and environmental concerns.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisites: ARCH 601, ARCH 611 Corequisites: ARCH 602

ARCH 623 Advanced Building Systems 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course will introduce students to building construction, materials, their relationship with the environment, as well as the most basic objectives in architecture: the provision for comfort, health and safety. Students will learn and understand the complexities of developing a basic understanding on how to achieve and maintain these provisions, integrate them into the architectural design process. Introducing a holistic conception of architecture is the main goal of the Building Systems course sequence. The sequence is to be understood as parallel and integrated with the studio experience. Just as it is expected that issues of sustainability, mechanical system and construction manifest themselves within their studio projects, it is also expected that issues of form and space manifest themselves in the building systems course. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits 1.5-2.5-3

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisites: ARCH 622, ARCH 612

ARCH 631 Comp & analysis of Built form 3.00 School of Arch & Design
In this course students will learn about seminal works of architecture in the 20th and 21st century, through analytic/ comparative methods, rigorous research and writings. It is designed to focus on the tectonics of building design and culture beyond the scope of traditional history of architecture. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

ARCH 632 Special Topics in Architectural History & Delineation 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course offers study in special topics in architectural history and delineation. This course focuses on the use of analog and digital skill sets, including databases and software to compile and represent research conclusions, and to establish methods for original research.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 661

ARCH 641 Arch Visual Communications I 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course will introduce the computer as a medium for making and visualizing design decisions in architecture. This course will utilize a diverse computing environment based on multiple platforms, software, and data format exercises, intended to aid students in the initial comprehension of the construction, manipulation, and representation of information related to architectural design. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

ARCH 644 Architectural Visual Communication 2 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course introduces advanced two and three dimensional CAD/CAM (computer aided drawing and modeling systems), presentation drawing and diagrams, rendering and post production techniques, and animation using various software platforms. Students experiment with interpretive and analytical drawing types in two, three, and four dimensions. Time, atmosphere and sequence of spatial propositions are described using rendered image stills, animated clips, and a variety of cinematic editing and cutting techniques along with advanced real-time simulations in virtual reality. With continually emerging software and rapidly evolving implementations in practice, students learn to work collaboratively and intelligently between traditional and emerging platforms to generate comprehensive, holistic projects that are thorough in both design process, production and in representation.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 641

ARCH 661 Arch History I, Architectural Principles & the History of Urban Form 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course introduces the student to the history and theory of architectural principles that guided urban design in pre-modern and modem era Focus will initially be on the notions of an 'Ideal City' in Classical Antiquity and the Italian Renaissance, with comparisons where appropriate to non-Western examples (e.g.China); the writings and projects of Vitruvius, Alberti, Filarete and others will figure prominently. In the second part of the course, the shift in focus will be on the modem era, particularly the 1960s & 70s, and the principles that influenced the design of urban form in the Americas and in Japan. The major contributions of F .L. Wright, Le Corbusier, Yona Friedman, the Metabolists, OMA and others will be addressed. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

ARCH 662 Arch History II, Identities and Resistances in Contemporary Non-Western Architecture 3.00 School of Arch & Design
The architectural production of developing societies generally receives scant attention in the professional press, compared to that of the industrialized developed nations of Western Europe, America and Japan. The reasons for this lack of interest and coverage are multiple and complex, among them being the priorities of capitalism in a globalizing economy which give precedence to the building economies and cultural values of richer societies over that of the poorer ones. Yet, in spite of this intentional disregard by the West, there is a great deal of quality of design in the non-Western world, reflecting common concerns for evolving an authentic expression of modernist and traditional values, and avoiding a slavish imitation of Western culture. This course is proposed as an introduction Lo the issues and personalities that are shaping the built environment today in much of the non-western world. Since many of the societies in question were formerly colonies of Western imperial powers, it is not surprising that many contemporary designers were either educated abroad or, more recently at home but in schools founded (and in some cases staffed) by professionals of the former colonizing powers. Hence, the complicated issues of identity, resistance, or outright rejection that arise again and again in the arena of cultural values. Taking the designed built environment as our subject, we shall attempt to situate and circumscribe the theoretical debates that are occurring, emphasizing common features where they occur, such as climate, religion, ethnic composition and social hierarchies, but also shared problems like low-cost housing or are institutional projects. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 661

ARCH 663 History of Landscape I, Gardens and Urban Space 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This is a course devoted to the history and theory of landscape and garden design and their relationship to urban space. In particular, the relationship of man-made landscapes to built form within an urban context will be addressed; the links between urban parks and gardens and regional developments will also be studied. The examples presented cover not only a vast span in time, from antiquity to the present, but also a variety of civilizations. We shall focus on a certain number of significant concepts and theoretical issues in each presentation; some will be dealt with in greater depth than others.

ARCH 664 Arch Hist 4 History of Landscape, Gardens and Urban Spaces II 3.00 School of Arch & Design


Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 663

ARCH 691 Principles of Social/Economic Environments 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course is focused on analyzing how social, economic and political dynamics are able to effect and shape our territories, both globally and locally. Transitional and Resilient theories are only some of the approaches which try to describe and understand transformation and adaptation processes, related to both human and natural behaviors; which are able to determine a specific social environment, as well as the way to see, use and move through the space, modifying it. Special attention will be dedicated to strategies of managing informal urban densification processes (sustainability and public health), rules, procedures available, and state of the art- in terms of laws and bureaucratic tools for community oriented projects in underdeveloped Countries (India, Africa, South America, China). Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

ARCH 693 Environment Eco and Managment 3.00 School of Arch & Design
The environmental debate involves several scientific/ academic fields, but also policy and decision- makers, public administrations, private agencies and consistent investments, in terms of human and financial resources. New environmental approaches and regulations have created a need for expertise and managers with an understanding of environmental issues of cross connections, in a synergic way within these. Environmental quality is deeply related to transformation processes involving energy consumption and production of waste and pollution with relevant environmental impacts. Therefore, it has become a priority to define and structure alternative energy systems environmentally sustainable; new technologies of production and strategies of reduction/ recycle of waste; new decisional and managing expertise.

ARCH 694 Portfolio-Meth, Tools and Medi 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This elective course is organized in a series of seminars and individual tutoring meeting taught by a team of professors and experts. It is considered an auxiliary class, which aims to help in clarifying and communicating through appropriated and coherent tools and media(tech, design, writing…) the final thesis research and project. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-1-3

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisites: ARCH 604, ARCH 643 Corequisties: ARCH 605

ARCH 701 Urban and Regional Design Studio I 6.00 School of Arch & Design
Design studio problems focus on both theoretical and real contexts, utilizing required skills of architectural design to address broader issues of the form of cities, suburbs, and their regional inter-relationships. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-6-6

ARCH 702 Urban and Regional Design Studio II 6.00 School of Arch & Design
Continuation of Urban and Regional Design Studio I. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-6-6

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 701

ARCH 703 Urban and Regional Design Studio III 6.00 School of Arch & Design
Continuation of Urban and Regional Design Studio II. This course constitutes the "capstone" demonstration of ability at the level of a Master's of Architecture Degree. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-6-6

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 702

ARCH 704 M. ARCH Studio 4 6.00 School of Arch & Design
Students explore public architecture through the design of a medium-scale institutional building of moderate spatial complexity, for a local urban site. Students are challenged to integrate design ideas into a meaningful spatial strategy that considers site, program, circulation, structure, enclosure systems, and environmental issues. Phased exercises will demand a variety of representation techniques and design methods including sketches, drawings, diagrams, and physical models.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 603 Corequisite: ARCH 722, ARCH 741

ARCH 705 M. ARCH Studio 5 6.00 School of Arch & Design
This studio is a semester-long comprehensive design of a building of moderate complexity with at least one space requiring long-span structural components. Its scope includes adjacent outdoor space and development and integration of structure, building enclosure, systems, materiality and sustainability to an increasingly plausible level of detail and specificity.

ARCH 721 History of the City and Region 3.00 School of Arch & Design
Survey the historic development of cities as artifacts of concentrated human settlement and its related regions.

ARCH 722 Building Systems 2 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course will place emphasis on the relationship between building design and all the building systems required for successful architectural project. This course acts as a companion course to the M.ARCH design studio ARCH 705, and all assignments are related to the project in the studio course; as such how to integrate system into the architectural design process through a holistic conception of architecture continues the main goal of the Systems course sequence. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 1.5-2.5-3

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite:ARCH 772 Corequisite: ARCH 705

ARCH 725 Theories of Urbanism and Suburbanism 3.00 School of Arch & Design
An examination of theories of urbanism, suburbanism and regionalism from its early history to the present, making the relationship of historical material to recent ideas and the problems and practices of today.

ARCH 726 Case Studies in Urbanism/Suburbanism 3.00 School of Arch & Design
Critical analysis of canonical urban and suburban design precedent, in terms of form, operations, and policy as carriers of meaning. Seminar format.

ARCH 727 Construction Documents 3.00 School of Arch & Design
In this course, students will study modern methods of construction drawing development, purpose and organization through the use of computer- aided design and drawing. Topics in this course include emerging methods/ documents used in projects delivery. The focus of this course is directed and guided in the preparation of a complete set of drawings: plans, sections, evaluations, details and schedules. All new topics introduced will support the development of these documents. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 704, ARCH 722

ARCH 741 Architectural Visual Communication 3 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course introduces the key relationships that exist among various methods of drawing, three dimensional form making, and technologies of full-scale fabrication and construction. The course also focuses on integrated, relational and ecological design thinking through interpretive, analytic, and generative uses of digital media, design computation logics, and parametric design methods. With continually emerging software and rapidly evolving implementations in practice, students learn to work collaboratively and intelligently between traditional and emerging platforms to generate comprehensive, holistic projects that are thorough in both design process, production and in representation.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 644

ARCH 772 Site Planning 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course will place emphasis on the relationship between site design (including green systems and universal accessibility) and building design and the building systems required for successful lighting design (daylighting and artificial), basic fire protection, vertical transportation. This course acts as a companion course to the M.ARCH design studio ARCH 704, and all assignments are related to the project in the studio course; as such how to integrate system into the architectural design process through a holistic conception of architecture continues the main goal of the Systems course sequence.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 621 Corequisite: ARCH 704

ARCH 801 M. ARCH Studio 6 6.00 School of Arch & Design
Students choosing this option will work in teams of three to four people design and design development documents for a project of medium complexity. Simulating an office environment, students will utilize Building Information Modeling techniques to document and organize their work. They will understand local and international building codes to address zoning and site related issues with respect to building massing, schematic design, and design development including egress, fire rating, construction and ADA requirements. Standards of professional practice will be referenced through use of the AIA agreement between the Owner/Architect b141 as a course organizing document. In addition students will be expected to integrate structure, mechanical electrical, HVAC and materials strategies into their design. Sustainable practices will be emphasized through reference to LEED and other evolving standards throughout the semester. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 2-6-6

ARCH 802 M. ARCH Studio 7 6.00 School of Arch & Design
This studio is organized around the fulfillment of clearly articulated integrated design goals at a scale and scope of work determined by research conducted in previous semesters, specifically in ARCH 801. Projects may range in scale from that of urban design and related spatial and infrastructure systems, to that of sustainable and integrated building design, down to product design, material systems, and responsive environments considering innovative architectural details and components. This studio serves as the capstone studio for the M.ARCH degree.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 801, ARCH 821, ARCH 862 Corequisite: ARCH 882

ARCH 821 Building Systems 3 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course supports an advanced investigation of architectural technology in various topics related to the concurrent design studio. Advanced research in extreme building types, extreme program types, physical simulation environments, financial simulations, and advanced fabrication technologies are supported. Technical documentation and/or physical fabrication output is required. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 722

ARCH 824 City and Regional Resources and Infrastructure 3.00 School of Arch & Design
A historical survey and review of contemporary applications of attempts to organize systems of communication, commerce, movement, settlement, etc. at both local and regional scales of operation.

ARCH 841 Digital Modeling for Urban Design I 3.00 School of Arch & Design
Introduction to modeling techniques for city and regional design using computer aided design methods and technologies. Application to simple urban and regional design problems.

ARCH 842 Digital Modeling for Urban Design II 3.00 School of Arch & Design
Continuation of Computer-Aided Design and Planning I. Advanced modeling of urban and regional design using input from remote sensing geographic information systems and new techniques of dynamic mapping and spatial simulation.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 841

ARCH 843 Digital Software Module I 1.00 School of Arch & Design
Master of Architecture in Urban and Regional Design (MAURD) students are required to learn specific and continually evolving digital software for urban research and design. This module-based course will provide students the software skills required for Urban Design Studio (ARCH 701) and Digital Modeling for Urban Design (851.) Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 0-1-1

ARCH 844 Digital Software Module II 1.00 School of Arch & Design
MAURD students are required to learn specific and continually evolving digital software for urban research and design. This technical course will provide students the software skills to succeed in Urban Design Studio (ARCH 702.) Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 0-1-1

ARCH 862 Architecture & Standardization 3.00 School of Arch & Design
Light bulbs and door hinges, paints and plumbing, insulation and electrical outlets: standards, legal ordinances, building codes, and technical specifications play an enormous role in governing the design of so many things that surround us. Still, we tend to be oblivious to their presence. The means by which they are developed, circulated, and enforced seems all too often to take place invisibly, even supernaturally, which is precisely why they are important as objects of study. Why do standard sheets tend to elude the attention of design historians and theorists? How does a standard "become" standard? It would be foolhardy to offer a totalizing answer to these questions - there is no "one size fits all" answer to why standards matter in the first place. Still, there is one point of which one can be safely assured, namely that standards and other such documents are not merely technical in nature; they need to be understood as social and cultural artifacts as well. They influence the way we think as much as they shape how we work and act. They have histories and warrant our critical attention. In this seminar, we explore theories and histories of standardization and other such "invisible" infrastructures; we explore their importance to the history of mechanization, automation, and prefabrication in design. We consider the dangers of standardization from a political, economic, and human rights point of view. We discuss standardization's relationship to capitalism, on the one hand, and modem statecraft, on the other. We theorize related concepts in architecture, from functionalism to the idea of "the user." We will use this course as an opportunity to help us understand the rise of construction management as a discipline. Our readings draw from the histories of architecture, technology, information, and politics; we will (hopefully) conduct at least one field trip; we also want to engage in candid conversation about how technology appears to be transforming the design professions today, particularly in the light of BIM (Building Information Modeling), automation, "the sharing economy," and globalization.

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 662

ARCH 871 Housing: Urban, Suburban, and Rural 3.00 School of Arch & Design
Analysis of the forms of residential buildings and neighborhoods at all densities in urban and suburban regions. Study of the relationship between architecture and public policy.

ARCH 880 Practice Models & Strategies 3.00 School of Arch & Design
This course presents an understanding of why the practice of architecture is, as it is today, and what are the possibilities for the future. The course expends the point of view of architecture practice to include that of the owner, developer, and entrepreneur. New business models and project delivery methods are explored. The organization and administration of a building project is examined in detail, from schematic design, to design development, to contract documents, to bidding and negotiation, through construction administration, and commissioning. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-0-3

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisites: ARCH 705

ARCH 881 Issues of Practice 3.00 School of Arch & Design
Students, either individually or in groups, will work with a community organization or planning agency on projects, attend meetings, make presentations, and produce a final report.

ARCH 882 Externship 3.00 School of Arch & Design
Students will work 12-16 hours per week at externships with government agencies, community associations, or architectural practices involved with urban design. Students will meet and report regularly with the Program Director on their work and the employer will make a final report to the Director. Students shall submit final written reports or project presentations. The externships will be developed and/or approved by the Program Director. Paid Internships that provide a stipend to cover the cost of three credits of tuition may be permitted with approval of the program director. International students must also have approval from the international student advisor.

Dept Cnst

ARCH 883 Internship 0.00 School of Arch & Design
Students have the opportunity to work in an architecture environment to gain practical experience, increase professionalism, develop a basic understanding of the work environment, and sharpen career focus. To be eligible, students must be enrolled in the MAURD program and must have at least one semester in NYIT with 3.0 or better GPA. Course may be repeated.

Dept Cnst

ARCH 884 Independent Urban Design Studies 1.00 School of Arch & Design
Students are encouraged to pursue independent academic research, within the mandate of the MAURD program. During their third (and final) semester, these students will be permitted on a case-by-case basis to conduct independent research under faculty and/or external supervision. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 0-1-1

Prerequisite Course(s): Prerequisite: ARCH 701

DSGN 721 Visualization to Final Product: Manufacturing and Production flow of Furnishings, Fixtures and Equip 3.00 School of Arch & Design
Prototyping, manufacturing, distribution and marketing strategies, within a global context, are analyzed to develop a series of fully realized proposed product lines. These examples of completed works are used towards studying the effects of distribution and testing within specific lifestyle markets of the world of interiors, furnishings, and design. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-1-3

DSGN 780 Entrepreneurial and Business Development for the Design Disciplines 3.00 School of Arch & Design
An advanced class in global management concepts and entrepreneurship that focuses on ideation of a Design Profession venture, its required infrastructure, aspects of its business management, required financing, long range strategic planning, basic budgeting, organizational structures, and models of studio practices. Local and international business and finance strategies are taught against the backdrop of comprehending financial instruments and contractual agreements; additionally business planning techniques and practices. Classroom Hours- Laboratory and/or Studio Hours- Course Credits: 3-1-3

DSGN 781 Real Estate, Planning, In House Design Divisions, and Facilities Management 3.00 School of Arch & Design