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Apr 27, 2011

Developing Creative Classrooms

When IBM’s Institute for Business Value recently (2010) surveyed 1500 chief executives to find out the qualities CEOs value most in today’s business marketplace, the quality that rose to the top of the list was not dedication, a sense of humor, or technical expertise. Creativity is seen as the skill that helps businesses respond to changing customer relationships and operational problems.  In A Whole New Mind (2006), Daniel Pink emphasizes creativity as the basis for workers adept at what he calls “high touch” and “high concept,” and concludes that right-brained people will rule the world of the future. In The… More

Author: francine_glazer

Apr 20, 2011

Simple Stress Relief

That time of year is upon us, when many of us have piles of papers and exams to grade, year-end reports to submit, and just a general seemingly unbearable amount of chaos in our lives.  Even when we "take breaks," it's usually not to actually relax but to just complete other tasks that somehow don't seem as daunting as the ones from which we are taking said breaks.     Over the past few years, I've realized that one of the many benefits of yoga (which I teach) is that I can slow down and refocus and relax at any… More

Author: francine_glazer

Apr 12, 2011

Using Concept Maps

Student learning of new concepts requires connecting the new concept to old learning. Understanding grows as layers are added through connections to old ideas, and deepens as old ideas are rearranged through sudden insights.   This process can be made more explicit by using concept maps—a graphical representation, like an organizational chart, of a central idea.   To build a concept map for a particular topic, the creator identifies a central idea or focus question for the map. After recording as many ideas that fall within the focus question as possible, he or she then orders them approximately from the… More

Author: francine_glazer

Apr 05, 2011

Evaluating Students on Class Participation

Do you want to include class participation in your grading but find it difficult to grade participation fairly?   Develop a rubric to evaluate student participation. Suggested criteria for a rubric include:   ·      How often did the student participate during class? ·      Were contributions relevant to the topic under discussion? ·      Did the student appear to be adequately prepared? Did contributions reflect or apply the content of course readings? ·      Did the student contribute new ideas? ·      What was the quality of evidence of critical thinking in the student’s contributions? ·      How well did the student listen to the… More

Author: francine_glazer

Mar 29, 2011

Seven Principles for Developing Assignments and Providing Good Feedback

The feedback we give our students can have a tremendous influence on how effectively they learn.  Here are seven principles to keep in mind when designing assignments and providing feedback to students.   1.     Help students understand what you define as “good work.” Give the students examples of what you expect from them. Consider providing them with the scoring rubric you will use when grading the assignment.   2.     Help students to reflect on what they learned Students learn best when they have opportunities to practice their skills. Have students read and evaluate each others’ work. Have them give feedback… More

Author: francine_glazer

Mar 23, 2011

Alternative Spring Break: Peru 2011 vol.2

Jeremy Ducos just checked in by phone from Peru.  The group is doing really well.  Phone service is limited as they are situated on the top of a mountain. It is 94 degrees and they have been building a soccer field.  By the end of the day the students are exhausted, but express gratitude for the opportunity to work with each other and the community.  Jeremy says that the group is amazing.  They've jelled very quickly and act more like family than friends.  More than anything else, he says the group is moved by the happiness of the families that… More

Author: amy_bravo

Mar 22, 2011

Successful Strategies for Teams: Team Member Handbook

by Frances A. Kennedy, Ph.D. with Linda B. Nilson, Ph.D Teamwork is one of the skills most prized by prospective employers. It’s important to remember that our students don’t necessarily come into college knowing how to work effectively with others, and to construct team assignments in a way that helps them learn not only the content, but also the necessary interpersonal skills. This week’s teaching note showcases a set of resources that will help your students do exactly that.   Published in 2008 by the Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation at Clemson University, Successful Strategies for Teams is an… More

Author: francine_glazer

Mar 21, 2011

Alternative Spring Break: Peru 2011

 10 NYIT students left on Saturday, March 19, 2011 to volunteer in a community called Independencia, Peru.  They will work on clean water and composting projects.  When not working in the field they will be volunteering at a local orphanage spending time with @25 children aged 2-12. Independencia is a very poor community with limited access to clean water.  Each morning, families fill jugs for their daily water (for drinking, cooking and cleaning).  They need help from our students to identify more efficient and sanitary ways of storing and collecting water. The composting project is to reuse and renew all… More

Author: amy_bravo

Mar 16, 2011

Importance of Students’ Prior Knowledge

“. . . the contemporary view of learning is that people construct new knowledge and understandings based on what they already know and believe . . ..” Implications for Teaching and Learning “A logical extension of the view that new knowledge must be constructed from existing knowledge is that teachers need to pay attention to the incomplete understandings, the false beliefs, and the naive renditions of concepts that learners bring with them to a given subject. Teachers then need to build on these ideas in ways that help each student achieve a more mature understanding. If students' initial ideas and… More

Author: francine_glazer

Mar 08, 2011

How Experts Differ from Novices

Purpose: To help faculty members appreciate the gulf between their expert knowledge and their students’ novice understandings so they can create positive teaching and learning situations.    Bransford, Brown, and Cocking (2000) have identified some important characteristics of experts that have implications for teaching and learning:   “1. Experts notice features and meaningful patterns of information that are not noticed by novices. 2. Experts have acquired a great deal of content knowledge that is organized in ways that reflect a deep understanding of their subject matter. 3. Experts’ knowledge cannot be reduced to sets of isolated facts or propositions but,… More

Author: francine_glazer

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Profiles
Kathie Golden Kathie Golden
Administrative Assistant
Office: Global Academic Programs
Campus: Old Westbury
Beth Adubato Beth Adubato, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department: Behavioral Sciences
Campus: Old Westbury
Catherine Flickinger Catherine Flickinger, J.D.
General Counsel
Office: General Counsel
Campus: Old Westbury