New York Tech Alerts

Last Updated November 20, 2020

Check new campus access policies at nyit.edu/alerts. As of November 25, all instruction will be remote, temperature checks and student questionnaire or employee/visitor questionnaire will be enforced.

 

Distance Learning (DL) Classrooms

NYIT offers synchronous distance learning (DL) courses where teacher and students meet at the same time, but are separated by physical distance at our Long Island, New York City, or Vancouver campuses. This DL approach can extend the reach of faculty to provide classes for smaller student populations, provide access to experts around the world, and support ongoing access to course content anywhere, at any time. The DL classrooms are technology-rich environments that have multiple displays for audio and video, large instructor's podium, document camera, mobile device connectivity, internet access, and video conferencing.

Available Classrooms

The Academic Computing main office on Long Island is in Harry Schure Hall, Room 239. The ACS office in New York City is located in the Edward Guiliano Global Center, Room 701A.

Long Island Campus

  • Room DL 1
  • Room DL 2
  • Room DL 3
  • Room DL 4
  • Room DL 5 (Room 227)
  • HSH, 2nd Floor (login required)

New York City Campus

  • Room 701 (DL 1)
  • Room 706 (DL 2)
  • Room 704 (DL 3)
  • Room 708 (DL 4)
  • Room 702 (DL 5)
  • EGGC, 7th Floor (login required)

Request DL CLASSROOM training

Video Tutorials

Overview of the Distance Learning Touch Panel

Overview of the Distance Learning Touch Panel

How to Request Assistance

How to Request Assistance

Selecting Your Presentation Source

Selecting Your Presentation Source

Using Display Control

Using Display Control

Adjusting Volume

Adjusting Volume

Camera Controls

Camera Controls

New Features

New Features

Best Practice Tips

Make Distance Learning (DL) Classrooms Personable—on Both Sides of the Connection
Tips for Teaching in DL classrooms from Professor James Dunne

Before class starts:

  1. Ask your students in both rooms to cluster together in the center of the room, so they form a square. In other words, have students sit in multiple rows, but in the center of the room. Zoom in on the group in each room, so students are as large on the screen as possible. This creates a more intimate atmosphere where students feel like they are all together as one group.
  2. Zoom in on yourself as much as possible. The more students can see your face and your gestures, the more they feel connected.
  3. Make a conscious effort to comment on "little things" in the other room, like what a student is drinking, a shirt they are wearing, or saying "bless you" when someone sneezes. These things may seem insignificant, but they let the students in the remote classroom know that they are noticed, acknowledged, and equally part of a single class and collective group of students.
  4. Take care of the logistics in advance: log into the computer and Blackboard, zoom in, and adjust the volume before starting your lecture. Confirm with a student in the remote class that the volume is sufficient.

During class:

  1. Dedicate at least 60% of your time talking to students on the far side of the connection. It's critically important to make eye contact directly with the camera. Spend the rest of your time looking at the students in the room you are in and, if necessary, your monitors. It is vital to keep the students in the other room engaged.
  2. If you see a student raise their hand in the other room, immediately acknowledge them by saying, "I see your hand raised, John," even if you then go on with your lecture to finish your thought. In a traditional classroom, you could acknowledge them with a head nod or a gesture, and finish your thought. In the DL room you can not. If you do not immediately acknowledge the student in the other room, they will feel frustrated, ignored, and seated in a "far off land."
  3. If you are using one display to show something from the computer or document camera and a student asks a question, be sure to Stop Presentation. Switch the display to show the classroom from where the student is speaking. You always want students in both rooms to see the student speaking. Restate the comment or question to make sure everyone hears it.
  4. Solicit input from students by calling on them if necessary, even if this isn't your traditional classroom style. If students know that they will to be called on frequently, they are more likely to stay engaged.

Classroom management:

  1. When asking students if they have questions, always ask the students in the other location FIRST. If a student on your campus has a question, always defer to the other campus. The goal is to never have the students in the other room feel ignored. Go out of your way to engage them, banter, etc.
  2. Use Blackboard as much as possible. Homework submissions, lecture handouts, and other course materials can be distributed and collected that way. Use Blackboard for testing and assessment whenever possible, and consider project-based assessments in addition to, or instead of, exams.
  3. Be kind to the Academic Computing Staff (ACS) by respecting their time. They are knowledgeable and supportive, and as a result are pulled in many directions. If you use Blackboard to distribute and collect materials, you won't need to ask the ACS to come in and out of your classroom, which distracts the class … especially in the room you are not in. If laptops aren't necessary to the lecture content and class activities, encourage students to hand-write notes. Anything that diverts their attention from engagement with the other room distracts them, as well as the students seated around them in their room.
  4. Print your roster NYIT Connect with ID photos of each student. Enlarge the font and image size to help you recognize students, and call on them by name.
  5. Do a fast daily roll call so you get to know student names. It is so important to the DL experience. Students need to know that you know who they are and you are not just someone they are watching on TV.

Contact Us

516.686.1400
servicecentral@nyit.edu

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