In the Media

Speights Warns Residents About Dangers of Ivermectin Paste

Aug 04, 2021

As seen on ABC, NBC, and CW affiliate KAIT-8 TV, as well as many other outlets across the nation, NYITCOM-Arkansas Site Dean Shane Speights, D.O. warned of the dangers caused by using veterinary medication to treat COVID-19. Sales of Ivermectin paste, used to treat worms in animals, are on the rise at farm supply stores across the U.S., with some people believing that it can treat COVID-19. However, Speights notes the frightening repercussions that may occur if humans ingest the medication, stating, “Let’s say it was manufactured for a large horse, but a human takes it, it can create low blood pressure, rapid heart rates, seizures, there are even episodes where you can see layers of your skin fall off. It can damage the liver, and there’s vision loss that can be associated.”

He also explained that the drug is only meant to kill parasites—not viruses. “The way that it works is it actually paralysis the worm by attacking the nerve and muscle cells. COVID is a virus. COVID doesn’t have nerve or muscle cells, so the mechanism in which the drug works wouldn’t work for a virus.”

 

Local Media Outlets Publicize Students' Academic Success

Aug 04, 2021

New York Tech students who made the Presidential Honor List for spring 2021 have been featured in their hometown news outlets, including the Gloucester City News, Hamlet Hub, and others. To qualify for the list, candidates must be full-time students enrolled in a degree program with a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Students named to the Dean’s List for spring 2021 were also featured in their local media outlets, including Tap Into. This recognition is granted to full-time students enrolled in a degree program with a GPA of 3.5 or higher.

 

Aug 03, 2021

As seen in Inside Higher Ed and InnovateLI, New York Tech’s newest degree program, the Master of Science in Risk Management, will provide companies with the highly trained talent and expertise needed to navigate the everchanging business environment. This new degree program is the most recent of several new degree programs New York Tech has launched to prepare students to address current and future real-world challenges, including a Ph.D. in Engineering, M.B.A. in Business Analytics, and Master’s in Public Health (M.P.H.).

 

Newsday Notes New York Tech Participation in WH COVID-19 Vaccine College Challenge

Aug 01, 2021

An article in Newsday explores vaccination plans for the upcoming fall semester at several Long Island colleges in light of the spreading Delta variant. It highlights New York Tech’s participation in the White House COVID-19 Vaccine College Challenge and the vaccine events to be held on both New York campuses. In terms of the evolving policies relating to vaccines and masking, "There’s a team that discusses this weekly," said Provost Junius Gonzales. "All you need is even a small breakout, it could be in Nassau County, that could completely change what you do on campus. That’s why I keep emphasizing ‘for now.'"

 

Spring 2021 Graduates Recognized in Hometown Media

Jul 31, 2021

Spring graduates of the Class of 2021 were featured in local news outlets, such as Huntington Now, Rome Sentinel, News and Tribune, and others. More than 1,100 students received degrees from New York Institute of Technology this spring.

 

Exercise Science Expert Featured in AskMen.com

Jul 28, 2021

Alexander Rothstein, M.S., coordinator and instructor for the Exercise Science, B.S. program, is quoted in the AskMen.com story, "How Often Should You Work Out?" Rothstein provides tailored guidance for those who are new to exercise, as well as those with more experience. For advanced individuals, he suggests a six-day regimen that alternates muscle groups, includes more intense cardiovascular exercise, and allows for recovery.

“When an individual performs a lower body workout with a very high-intensity level, they place a tremendous amount of stress on their muscles, bones, and nervous system. This usually means the individual should either rest the next day or have a less intense workout the following day using different muscle groups,” says Rothstein.

 

Gotham Gazette: NY’s Economic Recovery Needs Internships for People with Disabilities

Jul 26, 2021

A New York Tech study conducted with the Institute for Career Development (ICD) is referenced in an op-ed in Gotham Gazette. The study, “Opportunities for Pathways & Collaborations,” recommends steps to widen the pool of people with disabilities with tech skills. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. unemployment rate for people with disabilities was 2.5 times higher than for those without, and the pandemic has severely impacted their employment and job prospects. New York’s business and nonprofit communities can play a vital role in the economic recovery of people with disabilities by reaching out for job candidates and by providing internships, the piece urges.

 

MyFitnessPal Quotes Exercise Science Expert

Jul 23, 2021

Advice from Alexander Rothstein, M.S., coordinator and instructor for the Exercise Science, B.S. program, was featured in the MyFitnessPal story, “Three Perks of Hot-Weather Workouts.” Rothstein discusses heat-training, which, if done safely, can provide physiological benefits, including increased endurance levels, cardiovascular strength, and calorie burn. Rothstein recommends that heat-training beginners start with a bike ride, which can provide a challenging workout that also allows for intensity control. 

 

Jul 22, 2021

Research by NYITCOM-Arkansas Paleontologist Jason Bourke, Ph.D., assistant professor of basic sciences, is highlighted in Scientific American and The Hill. The stories discuss how heavily armored dinosaurs, known as ankylosaurs, self-regulated their body temperature to survive in hot pre-historic climates. Bourke, who is working alongside Ohio University paleontologist Bill Witmer, Ph.D., has modeled the dinosaurs' nasal airflow in computer simulations that depict corkscrew-shaped nasal cavities. These uniquely shaped airways, which also resemble a child's crazy straw, acted like the coils found inside today’s air conditioners, cooling the blood before it reached the brain and preventing the animals from dying of heatstroke.

 

Yahoo and REAL SIMPLE Highlight Rothstein's Exercise Science Expertise

Jul 21, 2021

Insight from Alexander Rothstein, M.S., coordinator and instructor for the Exercise Science, B.S. program, was featured in REAL SIMPLE and Yahoo Life. In the story, experts share advice for maximizing the results of one’s annual flu shot, with Rothstein discussing the impact of exercise on immunity.

"Exercise is a controlled form of stress that stimulates several responses in the body," he explains. "One of these responses is the deployment of white blood cells and, even more directly, the deployment of these cells to working and/or inflamed tissue where they may be needed most."