Media Coverage

Cohn Op-Ed: “What My Research Reveals About Gift Giving”

Dec 01, 2021

“The National Retail Federation predicts that, this year, 13.3% of holiday gifts will be returned. The economic and relationship cost of bad gifts is high,” writes School of Management interim dean  Deborah Y. Cohn, Ph.D. in an op-ed in Baltimore Jewish Times.

Cohn’s research has focused on why many consumers buy gifts that are unwanted, even when buyers are trying to please. “On the one hand, with the best intentions, givers misjudge the recipient’s preferences. Other times, my research found that givers intentionally give bad gifts,” she writes, adding that some givers “send a message that can be interpreted as mean spirited.” Cohn’s research identifies bad gifts that are given on purposes and categorizes them as: 1) threats to self-concept, 2) to you – for me, 3) hostile, 4) ritual and obligation, and 5) competition.

The piece, focusing on Chanukah gift-giving, also offers advice on how to give gifts to people one cares about. Read the full op-ed.  

 

CNBC Publishes Henao Op-ed

Aug 15, 2022

A CNBC op-ed by Dean of Students Felipe Henao, Ed.D., calls for college administrators to take a page out of corporate America's playbook and start making customer service a top priority for higher education. He writes that just as customer bases evolve over time, so do student bodies. Yet higher ed has failed to keep up. 

He suggests looking to Disney and other companies, including Zappos, for customer service insight. Henao also urged colleges to identify new ways to remove barriers to student success. “Since student bodies across many college campuses are incredibly diverse, it should be a mandate to deliver services that meet their unique needs -- just as companies do with their customers,” he writes.

Additional outlets, including MSN, also featured the op-ed.   

 

LIBN Honors Two New York Tech Deans

Aug 12, 2022

Dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine Nicole Wadsworth, D.O., and Dean of the School of Health Professions Gordon Schmidt, Ph.D., were name to Long Island Business News2022 Power Health Care list (beginning on page 17). The list recognizes professionals who are making significant contributions that impact the health and well-being of the community and includes those who run healthcare systems, hospitals, nursing homes, physician practices, or healthcare support businesses as well as healthcare education programs.

 

Hometown News Outlets Highlight Student Achievements

Aug 06, 2022

Local media outlets featured the academic accomplishments of New York Tech students, including, among others, The Monmouth Journal and Hamlet Hub, which highlighted area students named to the Presidential Honor List and Dean’s List for spring 2022. In addition, Centralmaine.com, Houston Chronicle, and others highlighted incoming first-year students who received the Presidential Scholarship and Theodore K. Steele Memorial Scholarship.

 

Infectious Disease Physician Quoted in Health Magazine

Aug 01, 2022

Epidemiologist and infectious disease expert Carl Abraham, M.D., assistant professor of clinical sciences at NYITCOM-Arkansas, was quoted in Health magazine regarding the impact of monkeypox on children. Abraham notes that, as with other diseases, neonates, or extremely young children in their first weeks of life, are likely vulnerable because of their weaker immune systems. However, he adds that it's hard to know for sure how severely they may be affected because of the small number of confirmed cases in children currently.

 

Italian Media Covers SoAD Delegation Visit to Peccioli

Jul 27, 2022

On July 18, a delegation from the School of Architecture and Design visited the model landfill of the town of Peccioli, in Italy, as part of a collaboration on Resilient Communities.  Italian media covered the delegation’s visit.  Peccioli, in the heart of Tuscany, was recently nominated as the small Italian capital of contemporary art; the School of Architecture and Design has been invited to carry out a series of activities aimed at further fostering the impact of Peccioli's initiatives on sustainable regeneration.

 

Nizich Adds Expertise on Using Chaos Testing to Stabilize Cybersecurity

Jul 26, 2022

Communications of the ACM quoted Michael Nizich, Ph.D., director of the ETIC and adjunct associate professor of computer science, in the article “Defending the Enterprise,” about how organizations use cybersecurity chaos experiments to simulate events to uncover deficits and then repair or rearchitect as needed to improve their resilience to attack.

"The most worrisome of modern cyberattacks with the most chaotic outcomes is an IoT attack rendering thousands of medical devices and even implants to work improperly or not at all," Nizich said, citing that among the disruptive cyberattacks of a more significant concern than ransomware.

 

Jul 18, 2022

Several New York Tech students were recently featured in their local media for numerous accomplishments. For example, Syosset Advance and CentralJersey.com highlighted students who received awards as part of New York Tech’s 61st annual commencement, while newly enrolled students were recognized in The Ledger and other local news outlets.

 

Live Science Interviews Sports Medicine Physician

Jul 15, 2022

Hallie Zwibel, D.O., assistant dean of clinical operations and director of the Center for Sports Medicine, was interviewed for a Live Science article about exercise intolerance.

“Exercise intolerance is the inability to exercise and engage in physical activity that would be typical for the individual's age,” explains Zwibel. “It is different from someone being ‘out of shape’ due to not exercising regularly. Individuals with exercise intolerance cannot build the necessary stamina with exercise. Exercising can cause more discomfort to people with this condition.”

 

Jul 14, 2022

The Hill, Becker's Hospital Review, and other outlets make note of a COVID-19 database managed by Rajendram Rajnarayanan, Ph.D., assistant dean of research and associate professor at NYITCOM-Arkansas. He reports that the new subvariant BA.2.75 has been detected in seven states as of July 14, including California, Washington, Illinois, New York, North Carolina, Texas, and Wisconsin.