Osteopathic Medicine, D.O. / Medical & Biological Sciences, Ph.D.
Curriculum

Major Requirements

YEARS ONE AND TWO Credits:
Medical School – Preclinical
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
For details, refer to preclinical medical school curriculum.
 
YEAR ONE Credits:
MBSC 921 Lab Rotation I 3
This course will provide students with an introduction to the research activities on-going in core faculty laboratories. During each Laboratory Rotation, the student will work full-time with a faculty mentor on a defined research project. The student will learn the theoretical underpinnings to a specific research area and the research techniques used to investigate questions in that area. The student is expected to participate in all laboratory activities including, but not limited to, experimentation, lab meetings, journal clubs, reading research articles related to the designated research topic and informal science discussions.

MBSC 922 Lab Rotation II 3
This course will provide students with an introduction to the research activities on-going in core faculty laboratories. During each Laboratory Rotation, the student will work full-time with a faculty mentor on a defined research project. The student will learn the theoretical underpinnings to a specific research area and the research techniques used to investigate questions in that area. The student is expected to participate in all laboratory activities including, but not limited to, experimentation, lab meetings, journal clubs, reading research articles related to the designated research topic and informal science discussions.

The curriculum and training of students utilizes a 2-3-2 model in which osteopathic medical students will pursue their medical education in years 1–2 (preclinical) and in years 6–7 (clinical). Ph.D. training will take place in years 3, 4, and 5, as well as over the summers.

Students will earn thirty (30) Ph.D. credits for material contained within the Year 1 and 2 medical school curriculum.

All students will participate in a Clinical Skills course (8 hours/month) throughout the Ph.D. portion of the program.
 
YEAR TWO Credits:
MBSC 923 Lab Rotation III 3
This course will provide students with an introduction to the research activities on-going in core faculty laboratories. During each Laboratory Rotation, the student will work full-time with a faculty mentor on a defined research project. The student will learn the theoretical underpinnings to a specific research area and the research techniques used to investigate questions in that area. The student is expected to participate in all laboratory activities including, but not limited to, experimentation, lab meetings, journal clubs, reading research articles related to the designated research topic and informal science discussions.

MBSC 999 Thesis Research 3
This course encompasses the research activities the student will conduct under the guidance of their doctoral thesis mentor as part of their doctoral thesis research. The student will gain an increasing understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of a defined scientific topic that ultimately will lead to the dissertation.

 
YEAR THREE Credits:
MBSC 900 Clinical Skills 0
This course is designed to enable students to maintain and further develop their clinical skills during the Ph.D. portion of the DO/PhD Program curriculum. Each term of the graduate portion of the Program, the student will spend one afternoon per month in the Academic Health Care Center observing and participating in patient care under the superervision of an NYITCOM clinician. These interactions will reinforce and enhance clinical skills the student has attained during the first two years of medical school.

MBSC 930 Scientific Ethics 1
This course is designed to introduce students to the major issues as they relate to the ethics of scientific research. The course will teach students the professional responsibilities of being a biomedical scientist. A combination of lectures, readings and case studies will stimulate the students' critical thinking about current ethical issues in biomedical research.

MBSC 931 Research Methods 3
This course is designed to familiarize the students with the fundamentals of selected laboratory methods used in morphometric, molecular, cellular and "omics" based biomedical research. The course is not designed to replace the specific training students will acquire in the research laboratories.

MBSC 932 Statistics 3
Course Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the application of statistical methodology within biomedical research. The course will teach students the key concepts about data distribution, commonly used descriptive and inferential methods, and the logic of sound experimental design.

MBSC 933 Scientific Reading and Writing I 3
This course is designed to teach students the essential skills required to effectively communicate the results of scientific research. The course will review principles of clear, persuasive writing, and apply these writing principles to the structures and styles of primary scientific research manuscripts, reviews, and grant proposals. The course will also teach the processes of peer review of manuscripts and research proposals. Readings and discussion of a diverse area of biomedical and clinical sciences will stimulate the students' critical thinking about how to evaluate and produce research literature. Focused writing assignments will provide introductory training on how to write a scientific manuscript and learn about all phases of manuscript and proposal submission, peer review, and revision.

MBSC 935 Form and Function From Genotype to Phenotype I 3
This course will focus on functional, structural, and developmental similarity across life and how observations in one species can be applied across the spectrum of life. Causal explanations of these similarities will involve the key concepts of homology and convergence, as well as how development can conserve or change form. Particular emphasis will be placed on how model organisms inform treatments of disease in humans, but students will be challenged to find appropriate models for other species. The course is divided among four exemplar organs/anatomical regions, the heart, kidney, limbs, and inner ear. These particular regions are chosen because many aspects of these regions/organs are fairly well understood whereas other aspects are the foci of research labs at NYITCOM.

MBSC 936 Form and Function From Genotype to Phenotype II 3
This course will focus on functional, structural, and developmental similarity across life and how observations in one species can be applied across the spectrum of life. Causal explanations of these similarities will involve the key concepts of homology and convergence, as well as how development can conserve or change form. Particular emphasis will be placed on how model organisms inform treatments of disease in humans, but students will be challenged to find appropriate models for other species. The course is divided among four exemplar organs/anatomical regions, the heart, kidney, limbs, and inner ear. These particular regions are chosen because many aspects of these regions/organs are fairly well understood whereas other aspects are the foci of research labs at NYITCOM.

MBSC 999 Thesis Research 9
This course encompasses the research activities the student will conduct under the guidance of their doctoral thesis mentor as part of their doctoral thesis research. The student will gain an increasing understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of a defined scientific topic that ultimately will lead to the dissertation.

 
YEAR FOUR Credits:
MBSC 900 Clinical Skills 0
This course is designed to enable students to maintain and further develop their clinical skills during the Ph.D. portion of the DO/PhD Program curriculum. Each term of the graduate portion of the Program, the student will spend one afternoon per month in the Academic Health Care Center observing and participating in patient care under the superervision of an NYITCOM clinician. These interactions will reinforce and enhance clinical skills the student has attained during the first two years of medical school.

MBSC 934 Scientific Reading and Writing II 3
This course is designed to teach students the essential skills required to effectively communicate the results of scientific research. The course will review principles of clear, persuasive writing, and apply these writing principles to the structures and styles of primary scientific research manuscripts, reviews, and grant proposals. The course will also teach the processes of peer review of manuscripts and research proposals. Readings and discussion of a diverse area of biomedical and clinical sciences will stimulate the students' critical thinking about how to evaluate and produce research literature. Focused writing assignments will provide introductory training on how to write a scientific manuscript and learn about all phases of manuscript and proposal submission, peer review, and revision.

MBSC 941 Advanced Topics Elective 3
This course will provide the student with the ability to delve in-dept into a defined topic selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor. The student will work with the faculty mentor in one-on-one or small group setting. Depending on the specific topic and class format, activities with include, but are not limited to, critical reading and analysis of scientific papers, writing and critique of research proposals and review articles, presentations and discussion, and formal quizzes and exams.

MBSC 942 Advanced Topics Elective (optional second elective) 3
This course will provide the student with the ability to delve in-dept into a defined topic selected by the student in consultation with a faculty mentor. The student will work with the faculty mentor in one-on-one or small group setting. Depending on the specific topic and class format, activities with include, but are not limited to, critical reading and analysis of scientific papers, writing and critique of research proposals and review articles, presentations and discussion, and formal quizzes and exams.

MBSC 999 Thesis Research 9
This course encompasses the research activities the student will conduct under the guidance of their doctoral thesis mentor as part of their doctoral thesis research. The student will gain an increasing understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of a defined scientific topic that ultimately will lead to the dissertation.

 
YEAR FIVE Credits:
MBSC 900 Clinical Skills 0
This course is designed to enable students to maintain and further develop their clinical skills during the Ph.D. portion of the DO/PhD Program curriculum. Each term of the graduate portion of the Program, the student will spend one afternoon per month in the Academic Health Care Center observing and participating in patient care under the superervision of an NYITCOM clinician. These interactions will reinforce and enhance clinical skills the student has attained during the first two years of medical school.

MBSC 999 Thesis Research 6
This course encompasses the research activities the student will conduct under the guidance of their doctoral thesis mentor as part of their doctoral thesis research. The student will gain an increasing understanding of the theoretical and practical aspects of a defined scientific topic that ultimately will lead to the dissertation.

 
YEAR FIVE SUMMER, YEARS SIX-SEVEN Credits:
Medical School – Clinical
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
Clinical training takes place over the summer of year 5 and years 6–7. See the D.O. academic program for details.
 
Ninety (90) Ph.D. credits will be required to obtain the Doctor of Philosophy degree (30 will be applied from the first two years of medical school curriculum).