Architectural Technology, B.S.A.T. – Construction Management
Curriculum

Discovery Core

Foundations Credits:
FCWR 101 Writing I: Foundations of College Composition1 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: WRIT 100 or Writing Placement Exam

A course introducing students to the fundamentals of college composition. Topics include writing process, rhetorical strategies, basics of critical reading and thinking, analytical writing, and argumentative writing. This course serves as a foundation to prepare students to succeed in other academic writing contexts. Coursework includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 151 Writing II: Foundations of Research Writing1 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: FCWR 101 or WRIT 101

Further development of the academic writing, critical thinking, and analytical reading skills taught in Writing I. An introduction to academic discourse in the four core seminar areas: literature, social sciences, behavioral sciences, and philosophy. Development of library skills leading to a documented research paper.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSP 105 Foundations of Speech Communication 3
Study of the fundamentals of verbal communication including public speaking, interpersonal communication, and small group interaction. Training in methods of obtaining and organizing materials and ideas for effective verbal communication.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCSC 101 Foundations of Scientific Process 3
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the big ideas of different scientific disciplines, and is grounded in the scientific process. The course focuses on interdisciplinary aspects, the scientific process, and it is writing intensive, interactive and relevant.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCIQ 101 Foundations of Inquiry 3
This course introduces you to the fundamentals of critical thinking. Topics include an overview of the research methods in various academic disciplines, reasoning, constructing an argument, and evaluating information. This course serves as a foundation for your continued development of critical thinking skills in other core classes, your major program coursework, and your personal and professional life.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
FCWR 303 Communication for Art and Design 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take one course in each group: Group 1 (FCWR 101 or FCWR 111 or WRIT 101 or WRIT 111) and Group 2 (FCWR 151 or FCWR 161 or WRIT 151 or WRIT 161)

Building on courses taken in their majors, students will learn and apply concepts of effective written and oral communication appropriate for careers in art, design, and architecture. In addition to forms appropriate to the business world, such as memos, letters, reports, proposals, and job application materials, students will learn strategies for writing career-specific forms such as project descriptions, design briefs, and marketing correspondence. Students will engage in both primary and secondary research, work collaboratively, and deliver oral presentations using visual aids and/or presentation software. Course work includes a computer lab component.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 18 Credits
[1] Non-native English speakers take FCWR 111 instead of FCWR 101, and FCWR 161 instead of FCWR 151.
 
Seminars Credits:
ICLT 3XX Literature choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICPH 3XX Philosophy choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICBS 3XX Behavioral Science choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
ICSS 3XX Social Science choice 3
Please view all course descriptions: http://www.nyit.edu/courses
    Total: 12 Credits
 
Math and Science Credits:
MATH 141 Precalculus 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 100 or MATH 101 or Math Placement Exam

A study of relations and functions; inequalities; complex numbers; quadratic equations; linear systems of equations; higher degree equations; trigonometric functions; identities; functions of composite angles; graphs of the trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; and binomial theorem. Note: A graphing calculator is used throughout the course.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
PHYS 136 Physics for the Modern Architect 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 141 or TMAT 155

The course will cover basic physical principles relating to current architectural practice. A broad spectrum of topics will be covered, primarily in classical physics to include: Units, Vectors, Motion, Statics, Work, Energy, Heat, Electricity, Sound and Light. The emphasis will be conceptual and required mathematical skills will be college algebra and trigonometry.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 4-0-4
    Total: 8 Credits
 

Major Requirements

Architecture and Interior Design Credits:
AAID 101 Design Fundamentals I 5
Co-Requisite: Co-requisite: AAID 140. Only declared Architecture or Interior Design majors can register for this course. All others require permission from the department chairperson.

Architectonics studies the nature of architectural and design ideas directly through medium of space. Mass-void modeling explores part transformation, figure-ground, etc. and is the basis of planimetric, axonometric, perspective and graphic studies.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-5-5
AAID 102 Design Fundamentals II 5
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: AAID 101. Only Architectural Technology or Interior Design majors can register for this course. All others require permission from the department chairperson.

Dynamics continues study of architectural ideas directly through space. Volume modeling explores spatial intersections, tartan grid, light, circulation, materials and structure, as aspects of plastic design at human scale. Animation and color also studied.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-5-5
AAID 140 Visualization I 3
The course focuses on three areas simultaneously: technical drawing, graphic and fine arts, and an introduction to computer applications in architecture and design. It includes descriptive geometry, art composition, mediums and techniques, analysis and theory of fine art, and computer software application. The course assists the production of the required Design Studio portfolio.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-3-3
AAID 160 Introduction to History, Theory, and Criticism in Architecture and Design 3
The course exposes the culture of architecture and design in order to acquire conceptual and language tools specific to the realm of architecture and design. It is thematic and topical rather than chronological and discusses theory, methodology, technology, construction, building equipment systems, and other fine arts and related fields.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
AAID 240 Visualization II 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: AAID 101 and AAID 140

Continuation of AAID 140 introducing basic CAD skills and architectural drawing as it pertains to producing drawings of buildings and interiors. Auto CAD skills and software, printing and plotting hardware are taught. The application of these combined with other visual presentation techniques are explored in relation to the design process and presentation. The course supports the design studio.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-2-3
    Total: 19 Credits
 
Architecture Credits:
ARCH 161 Global History of Architecture I 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: AAID 160

A survey of the global history of architecture from the Late Stone Age until the end of the Sixteenth Century. Students learn varied social and spatial patterns that characterize cultural growth, architectural histories, and urbanistic developments. The course examines major religions and belief systems and their physical and spatial embodiments. Constructed monuments and settlements in diverse parts of the world are discussed concerning cultural, technological, economic, environmental, and social conditions. These are understood at local and regional scale, including a variety of indigenous and vernacular settings, and within an integrated global perspective.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 162 Global History of Architecture II 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ARCH 161

A survey of the global history of architecture from the beginning of the Seventeenth Century through the early Twenty-First Century. Students learn varied patterns of cultural, intellectual, architectonic, and artistic trends. The course addresses the secular shift in western modernity and its impact on art, architecture, and construction methods in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Oceania. Parallel and divergent histories and theories of architecture are framed in a global perspective. This also includes a variety of indigenous, vernacular, local and regional settings in line with the rise of capitalism, nationalism, technological modernization, and cultural and political ideologies, as well as contemporary architectural and urban issues.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 201 Architectural Design I 5
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: AAID 102 or ARCH 102

Design problems are given that deal with specific issues as they pertain to the generation and making of architectural form/space, i.e. program, site, structure, material, light, geometry; all of which are understood as sources and reference for spacial intervention/solution. Emphasis is on the generation and evaluation of the architectural part.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-5-5
ARCH 202 Architectural Design II 5
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ARCH 201

Design problems are structured so as to necessitate the resolution of multiple issues simultaneously and interdependently. Emphasis is on the translation and development of a part into spaces capable of being inhabited and constructed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-5-5
ARCH 211 Statics and Strength of Materials 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 136 or MATH 140 or MATH 141 or TMAT 155

Statics and strength of materials; force systems; equations of statics; beam supports and reactions; geometric properties of sections; stress and strain; axial tensile stress and elongation; axial compressive stress and buckling; shear stress and shear diagrams; bending stress and moment diagrams and beam deflections.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 221 Building Construction I 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: AAID 102

The course introduces building construction and materials, and their interrelationship with the environment. Masonry and wood construction and material systems are studied in light of both their inherent physical properties and their assemblies and integration with other systems, including the influences of site and climate. Historical references frame the development and use of the materials, while comparisons with relevant contemporary buildings provide analysis of disadvantages and/or advantages of each. There is also a parallel introduction to the basic techniques of graphic representation of the language of construction methods, and methods of designing and detailing.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 222 Building Construction II 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ARCH 221

The course introduces building construction and building materials, and their interrelationships with the environment. Steel and concrete construction and material systems are studied in light of both their material properties and integration with other systems, including the influences of site and climate. Examination and analysis of both historical and contemporary references frame the discussions of material selection and use. Also covered are basic techniques of graphic representation used to convey design intent, construction details and methods.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 272 Environmental Site Planning 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take ARCH 202 and one course in this group: AAID 240 or ARCH 240

This course introduces concepts of land use development with respect to the environmental impacts of project construction and post-construction performance. Also introduced are factors to consider when proposing human interventions in the ecology of the earth, including climatic parameters of sun, wind, water and biomass, as well as human parameters such as zoning, landscaping, use, and noise, and building with its auxiliary exigencies. Students will analyze sites, form land-use plans, organize vehicular and pedestrian traffic, and assess the mutual impacts of the above on a given project. Through case studies, a visit to a public hearing and a final semester project, students will learn how community involvement and local regulatory agencies affect the site planning and development.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-3-3
ARCH 310 Structural Design 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ARCH 211

An introduction to the design of compression and bending members in structural steel. Connections by bolting and welding. Use of the AISC specification. An introduction to the design of concrete T-beams, one way slabs, columns, isolated footings and retaining walls. Introduction to indeterminate structures. Use of the ACI specification.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 324 Environmental Systems I 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ARCH 202

The course involves the study of the sun and water as they relate to the development and organization of a site and a building. Students learn and evaluate the many ways buildings incorporate the various plumbing and heating systems within their structures. In particular, the way in which these systems can be passive and environmentally efficient, including sources of water, storage, filtration and treatment, and the design of water distribution systems. The student will employ a simple design problem to diagram the plumbing and heating systems. Both passive and active systems will be investigated, including: elementary energy analysis, thermal properties of material (R and U factors), computation of heating and cooling loads, sanitary and storm drainage systems, and sewage disposal systems.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 325 Environmental Systems II 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: AAID 240 and one course in each group: Group 1 (ARCH 202 or DSGN 202 or DSGN 203), Group 2 (ARCH 324 or DSGN 221.)

The course introduces students to the fundamentals of electrical design: single and multiphase circuits, apparent and real power, grid distribution and redundant switching; characteristics of electrical distribution systems, computation of electrical loads, theory and design of wiring systems, electrical service and controls and the study of the electrical codes. Also included are architectural design criteria for the installation of vertical transportation fire, electrical, building systems and codes requirements as well as illumination theory, fixture types and design of lighting systems. The course also involves elementary acoustic design. Students learn and evaluate the many ways buildings incorporate electrical power, and cooling systems. Beyond understanding the basic physics of a system, the student is expected to understand the impact of these systems on an architectural project.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 327 CAD Construction Drawings 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: AAID 240 or ARCH 240 or ARCH 341

Modern methods of construction drawing development, purpose, and organization through the use of computer-aided design and drawing. Study is directed and guided in the preparation of a complete set of drawings: plans, sections, elevations, details, schedules, and an introduction to specifications through digital media.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 1-3-3
ARCH 411 Advanced Structural Concepts I 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ARCH 310 or ARCH 311 and ARCH 312

Conceptual studies of the behavior of structures under load and the analysis of forces acting on these structures. Building frames, trusses, long spans, prestressed and precast members. Use of models.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 412 Advanced Structural Concepts II 2
Continuing conceptual studies of behavior of structural systems including space frames, arches and domes, suspension structures, membrane structures, and high-rise buildings. Introduction to methods of analysis including use of the computer and models.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-0-2
ARCH 413 Architectural Simulation and Fabrication Optimization 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: ARCH 222, ARCH 310, ARCH 325, ARCH 340 Corequisites: ARCH 401

This is the terminal course for architectural visualization and building technologies. This course will integrate the accumulated knowledge acquired through the visualization, structures, and building technology course sequences. This course will use an applied experimental project-driven exercise to integrate these sequences through computational simulation and optimization evidence-based design. Each semester the course is offered, the faculty teaching the project-driven exercise will assist students in optimizing their design through a visualization simulation software (BIM, Rhino Grasshopper, Maya, others) that focuses on the simulation of architectural conditions - site conditions, structural typologies, materials, material-based construction system, or environmental systems. This project-driven exercise will range from design, to materialization and to fabrication, developing a range of possible results, from a 1:1 scale detail, to a 1:1 scale bay or full space, to a scaled envelope prototype system, to any other real scale prototype or experimental construction system.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 423 Project Integration Studio 5
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ARCH 202 and ARCH 325

Students working in teams generate and develop the design of a small-scale building. In the process the students incorporate the guidelines as described in the phases of service of the Professional A.I.A. Agreement. The design of a harmonious relationship between the site and building is stressed. Emphasis is placed on creativity in the process of integrating all building systems (spatial, structural, mechanical and electrical) in the design.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 2-5-5
ARCH 471 Construction Supervision and Management I 3
Concepts and goals of construction supervision and management and their application to contemporary building, including conventional and innovative building methods and structural concepts. Installation problems, requirements, and costs. Construction manager's legal responsibilities and obligations. The manager's relation to various building professionals. Quantity surveys, cost control, and scheduling.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 481 Professional Practice I 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Take ARCH 222 and one of the following groups: (ARCH 311 and ARCH 312) or (ARCH 310)

Introduction to the problems involved in the practice of architecture and building. A study of the personal, ethical, and legal interrelations of the architect, engineer, owner, builder, and artisan. An analysis of the organization and administration of an architectural practice, and the various legal forms under which it can be organized. Study of building laws, codes, and zoning and their application. Supervised externships in offices.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 59 Credits
 
Construction Management Credits:
ARCH 473 Construction Management Contracts 3
The management of a project from conceptualization to completion is studied. The responsibilities of the construction manager in contracts and communication with the owner, consultants and contractors/sub-contractors will be reviewed. Methods of financial management and account, record-keeping, construction safety and risk management/time management will be discussed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 474 Real Estate Fundamental Development 3
This course will outline the owner’s expectation of the construction manager in the development process. The history of real estate finance will be presented, then topics of project feasibility, zoning issues, and project financing will be presented and discussed by means of case studies.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 473 CAD Management and Administration 3
The management of a project from conceptualization to completion is studied. The responsibilities of the construction manager in contracts and communication with the owner, consultants and contractors/sub-contractors will be reviewed. Methods of financial management and account, record-keeping, construction safety and risk management/time management will be discussed.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
ARCH 476 Modern Construction Technologies 3
In this course students study the history of modern technological developments in construction methods and techniques. The latest innovations in the means and methods of construction will be explored, including value engineering programs. The course will use a case study and an internship/externship format.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 12 Credits
 
Additional Requirements (choose one of the following) Credits:
MATH 161 Basic Applied Calculus 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 141 or TMAT 155 or Math Placement Exam

An introduction to calculus and its applications. Topics include functions, limits, the derivative, tangent line, the chain rule, maxima and minima, curve sketching, applications, antiderivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration by simple substitution, finding areas.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
MATH 170 Calculus I 4
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: MATH 140 or MATH 141 or TMAT 155 or Math Placement Exam

Study of lines and circles. Functions, limits, derivatives of algebraic functions, introduction to derivatives of trigonometric functions. Application of derivatives to physics problems, related rates, maximum-minimum word problems and curve sketching. Introduction to indefinite integrals. The conic sections.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 5-0-4
PHIL 250 Logic and the Scientific Method 3
An introduction to the valid forms of reasoning and the methods of inquiry practiced by the natural, social, and behavioral sciences.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
PHYS 156 Selected Topics in Environmental and Energy Issues for the Modern Architect 3
Prerequisite: Prerequisite: PHYS 135 or PHYS 136

This course uses physical perspectives to descriptively examine issues relating to interactions between the built environment and the natural world as they are likely to be encountered by practicing architects in the 21st century; especially as they relate to building design, construction and utilization. Major topic areas addressed will include such environmental and energy issues as: greenhouse effect, acid rain, ozone layer depletion, air, water and land pollution, traditional and alternative energy resources and their efficient utilization. Additionally, issues associated with ambient electromagnetic energy exposure, light pollution, thermal pollution and other contemporary concerns will be discussed. A descriptive approach will be emphasized and required mathematical skills will be minimal. Invited speakers and/or field trips to local sites will be incorporated where possible to supplement and enrich classroom discussions.

Classroom Hours - Laboratory and/or Studio Hours – Course Credits: 3-0-3
    Total: 3–4 Credits
 
Total Required Credits = 131–132