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Oct 28, 2013

Good Luck on Your Mid-terms

As midterms approach, it’s important to develop good study habits early in the semester.  Many of us have played the game of catch-up and it’s never fun. In fact it can be stressful and overwhelming. Here are some basic steps to developing good study habits that students can use throughout their academic career.   I’m not saying that you need to study more; rather, I’m asking you to study better by maximizing the time you put into it.  Rewrite your class notes when possible: Doing this, especially important topics – formulas, charts or rules is a good place to start. It will reinforce… More

Author: susan_hershkowitz

Oct 23, 2013

Visualizing Data When You’re Not an Artist

"Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly. They can improve cognition by utilizing graphics to enhance the human visual system’s ability to see patterns and trends. The process of creating infographics can be referred to as data visualization, information design, or information architecture." Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infographic Have you ever had the opportunity to see some wonderful infographics, perhaps in the slides provided to you by your textbook publishers, in your disciplinary publications or even popular publications? You may have also heard about the value of using the “assertion-evidence” method for creating effective slides to accompany your presentations, which depends on… More

Author: francine_glazer

Oct 16, 2013

Why Students Don’t Read: Strategies to Increase Student Preparation for Class

A “flipped” class requires students to read assigned materials and complete other assigned work that prepares them to apply new learning during in-class activities that promote deep learning of course content and skills. Instructors can assign readings, but what if students do not complete these readings before coming to class? Hoeft (2012) reports that 56%-68% of students in a first-year class reported that they did not read assigned material before class. The most common reasons students give to explain why they did not read assigned materials are: They had too much to read. Their work schedule does not allow enough… More

Author: francine_glazer

Oct 09, 2013

Teaching with New Media

"When people talk to me about the digital divide, I think of it not so much about who has access to what technology as about who knows how to create and express themselves in the new language of the screen. If students aren't taught the language of sound and images, shouldn't they be considered as illiterate as if they left college without being able to read and write?" - George Lucas, filmmaker For some instructors, incorporating new media, namely audio, video, and web resources, into traditional text-heavy curriculum/assignments can appear overwhelming. Where do you start? What tools should be used? How… More

Author: francine_glazer

Oct 02, 2013

Activities to Make Lectures Interactive

In order to retain student attention and facilitate learning, consider integrating a variety of activities into a lecture-based course. Start by finding natural breaks in the content material and break up the lecture into shorter segments. In between the shorter lectures, add activities that require the students to review and apply their new learning and interact with each other. Mix it up by incorporating different activities each week. The change of pace, interaction, and variety can help to enliven the classroom atmosphere and encourage deeper learning for every student. Some activities to consider are listed below. Skeleton notes – Create… More

Author: francine_glazer

Sep 24, 2013

How Do We Know Our Students Are Learning?

You’re teaching a class, and it seems that everything’s going well. The students are nodding attentively, and when you ask if there are any questions, there aren’t. “Do you understand?” garners lots of nods and “yes” and “you bet!” responses. Then, a couple of weeks later, the students take the first exam, and based on their test answers, they didn’t really understand, after all. Has this ever happened to you? How do we really know that our students are learning what we are teaching? Many of us use traditional methods such as tests, quizzes, exams, and papers, reports, or projects… More

Author: francine_glazer

Sep 18, 2013

Course Design Tip Sheet – Planning to Teach

Adapted from the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard University Online Document Course Design Tip Sheet – available at: http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/html/icb.topic58474/CourseDesign.html In preparing to teach a course, it is helpful to first consider: 1. What is the purpose of this course? - What is it that the students will be able to know/think/do as a result of taking this course? What do you hope to teach the students? What is the single most important thing you hope they will leave the course knowing or being able to do? Why are you teaching it? (This is not about what facts… More

Author: francine_glazer

Sep 11, 2013

5 Tips to Help Structure Courses to Engage Students

Many instructors face a difficult challenge in their classrooms – students are not as interested in the course content as the instructor. This disengagement takes many forms – “working” on their laptops, texting, sleeping, and many others. The tips provided below may reduce these behaviors, promote student engagement, and help students understand your interest in the course content. Discuss the importance of the course in the lives of the students beyond the classroom. Point out both applications of the course content as well as general skills such as critical and creative thinking that might be learned. This will help students… More

Author: francine_glazer

Sep 04, 2013

Beyond Bloom: Expanding our Ideas about Learning Objectives

Many college faculty have heard of Bloom’s Taxonomy and have probably used one of the many helpful lists of accompanying verbs to craft measurable learning objectives. The six categories in Bloom’s Taxonomy for the Cognitive Domain (revised in 2001) – remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and creating – has been the go-to resource for writing learning objectives for over 50 years, assisting countless educators. The goal of using Bloom’s Taxonomy is to articulate and diversify our learning goals. So why has the writing of learning objectives, considered to be an essential aspect of creating effective and engaging learning experiences, too… More

Author: francine_glazer

May 08, 2013

Weekly Teaching Notes: 2012-2013 Index

I've enjoyed the conversations I've had with many of you this year, as you responded to me – in person or in email – about a particular idea. Below is a list of all the Weekly Teaching Notes from the 2012-2013 academic year, with direct links to each one. Weekly Teaching Notes will break for the summer and resume again in the fall. At the Center for Teaching and Learning, we are here throughout the summer and are eager to assist you with your teaching, course design or redesign, scholarly writing, and preparing your reappointment/tenure/promotion portfolios. (All consultations are voluntary… More

Author: francine_glazer

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Profiles
Robert Sherwin Robert Sherwin
Full-Time Faculty
Department: Communication Arts
Campus: Old Westbury
Deepa Bhalla Deepa Bhalla
Director, HEOP
Office: HEOP
Campus: Manhattan
Nicholas Bloom Nicholas Bloom, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Chair of Interdisciplinary Studies, and Director of the Core Curriculum
Department: Social Sciences
Campus: Manhattan