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Feb 26, 2014

Novel Strategies to Encourage Careful Reading and Energized Discussions

  You’re Having Them Read What?!? Recently, I decided to take a “great minds, great books” approach to the reading list in my Foundations of Research Writing course (FCWR 151). I’m having freshmen students read such long-dead yet eternally important folks as Homer, Sophocles, Aristotle, Plato, Confucius, Sun Tzu, Horace, Ovid, Chaucer, Dante, Shakespeare, Milton, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Hawthorne, Poe, Gilman, and Thurber. Most colleagues I shared this plan with raised their eyebrows and said such things as, “That is very interesting, but our students will never read that!” Well, anyone who knows me knows that if… More

Author: francine_glazer

Feb 19, 2014

Peer and Self-Evaluation of Participation in Discussion

We often focus on presentation skills as oral communication skills, but students also need to learn skills for leading and contributing to productive group discussions. Small group discussions can easily go off the rails when students indulge in off-topic talking, inadequate listening, and disrespectful behavior. The dynamic quality of class discussion presents challenges to faculty who would like to hold students accountable for the quality of their participation in these discussions. Multhaup (2008) describes how to prepare students for substantive class discussions and suggests two strategies for evaluating student contributions to class discussion. Many of these strategies can also be… More

Author: francine_glazer

Feb 12, 2014

Found Metaphors: A Strategy of Applied Creative Thinking

As English professors in general, and creative writing instructors in particular, we have used the technique of found poetry to convince students that the printed word abounds with more poetry than most people are cognizant of. We assign students to read typical print sources (e.g., newspapers and magazines) as well as atypical print sources (e.g., advertisements and soup-can labels) in order to locate some examples of poetry (e.g., free verse or metered) or poetic technique (e.g., metaphor, metonymy, and caesura). Now, in teaching applied creative thinking we’ve adapted the found poetry assignment into one involving found metaphors. As we say… More

Author: francine_glazer

Feb 05, 2014

Get Your Students’ Perspectives

On Assessment Day, January 15, one of the topics under discussion was how to gather and use student input to gauge whether you are meeting student learning outcomes at the course- or program-levels. There were some interesting ideas shared: In the College of Osteopathic Medicine, each cohort of students provide feedback at the end of each course. Faculty consider their comments and provide responses in writing. This format allows the faculty members to take time to consider the ideas, and prevents any feelings of being put “on the spot.” More often than not, the faculty incorporate suggestions from the students.… More

Author: francine_glazer

Jan 29, 2014

Prior Knowledge Check

“A teacher is one who makes himself progressively unnecessary.” - Thomas Carruthers On the first day of class, I like to ask students to write a 1-page response to the following question: “What do you know about (Insert your field here)?” I do this for multiple reasons: It activates prior knowledge, requiring students to pull from their experiences and see how they might apply those experiences to class material (Pressley et al., 1992). It demonstrates that I value what they may already know about the field. It puts the responsibility on the students and illustrates that this class will require… More

Author: francine_glazer

Jan 21, 2014

Sometimes, You Really Need to Meet Face-to-Face

“I used Zoom for a live lecture with 43 students and it was fantastic. They loved that they didn’t have to come in with the snow. One was actually on a bus with wifi!!” – Zehra Ahmed, School of Health Professions Yesterday’s snowstorm, which caused the the New York campuses to close on the first day of the spring semester, makes it an opportune time to introduce Zoom HD videoconferencing. I’ve written about it before, and would like to share with you some of the ways that faculty and staff at NYIT have been using this tool. First, a little… More

Author: francine_glazer

Dec 11, 2013

The Power of Tests to Teach

Conventional wisdom is that new information is acquired while studying, and the extent to which the material has been successfully learned is subsequently assessed through testing. Typically, most individuals consider examinations neutral with respect to the actual learning process. Researchers are now reporting that tests themselves may be an important part of long-term retention of new information (Karpicke & Roediger, 2007). In one such experiment subjects learned new material by reading blocks of information. One group of subjects read the test material four times and then took a quiz over the material five minutes after the last reading session. A… More

Author: francine_glazer

Dec 03, 2013

The ‘Gallery Walk’ as a Means to Making Metacognition Transparent

You turn a test back to your students. They look at their papers, and you span the room. Your students’ visages are telling – some look shocked, others proud, and still others are hurt or even bored. Perhaps one or two students ask to meet with you after class to “talk about their grade” or ask for the dreaded extra credit assignment. But, how often do they ask themselves how their studying approach (other than perhaps amount of time spent studying) affected their performance? Do they analyze their feedback to see if there were particular content areas they struggled with?… More

Author: francine_glazer

Nov 26, 2013

Happy Thanksgiving

The Student Solutions Center would like to take this opportunity to wish all of our students a very happy and safe Thanksgiving holiday.  I know I am thankful to be able to spend time with family and friends and I'm sure you are thankful to have a little downtime before you need to gear up for finals.  We will return on Monday, December 2nd.  If you have not already done so, please make arrangements to meet with yor academic advisor and register online for the spring semester.  Classes are beginning to fill up. If you think you may need some… More

Author: susan_hershkowitz

Nov 20, 2013

Help Students Learn from their Mistakes

Testing is primarily used for assessment purposes. It is a way for a teacher to determine if students have mastered the required material. After exams are graded they are often returned to the students with the intention that students will review their incorrect answers and understand their errors. In reality, most students just look at their grade and file the exam away. They never follow through to understand what they did wrong or to learn the concept they missed. Rather than reviewing exams in class and providing students with the correct answer, have students make “corrections” on their exam. This… More

Author: francine_glazer

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Profiles
Paul Dangerfield Paul Dangerfield
Executive Director and Campus Dean
Office: Global Academic Programs
Campus: Vancouver
Robert Hill Robert Hill, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chair
Department: Anatomy
Campus: Old Westbury
Yuko Oda Yuko Oda
Assistant Professor
Department: Fine Arts
Campus: Manhattan