Programming

The Center for Teaching and Learning offers a variety of programs:

  • Individual consultations are available upon request and are always confidential.
  • Public events bring together faculty members from across the institution to facilitate conversations about teaching, learning, scholarship, and service.
  • Continuing series enable faculty members to develop expertise in a particular area and make changes to their own practices. Groups typically meet monthly, are based on members’ interests, and can be formed upon request by a group of faculty members with a common interest.
  • Long-term programming is tailored to the needs and interests of specific groups.

Individual Consultations


Drop-in Consultations
NYIT faculty members are invited to contact the Center for Teaching and Learning with questions on any aspect of their professional work: teaching, scholarship, service, community involvement, managing professional relationships, work-life balance, and professional growth.

Portfolio Review
Faculty members applying for retention, tenure, or promotion are welcome to bring their portfolios to the Center for Teaching and Learning for review prior to submission. Portfolios are reviewed for consistency with institutional criteria, organization, clarity, and appropriate emphasis of strengths. Consultations are also available after receipt of reappointment letters to design and implement changes based on recommendations the faculty member may have received.

Quick Course Diagnosis
Quick Course Diagnosis provides a way for faculty members to obtain data on how well students are learning in a particular course. The process takes approximately 20 minutes of class time and is facilitated by the Center for Teaching and Learning. Data are compiled in a format that lends itself to longitudinal assessment of any changes the faculty member might make in the course.

Teaching Consultation Process
The teaching consultation process offers individual faculty members the opportunity to take an in-depth look at a specific course over a semester, with the goal of improving student learning. The process starts with an initial interview to determine the specific areas of focus, followed by a classroom observation, administration and analysis of a detailed student evaluation of teaching, and videotaping of a class session. Each stage is accompanied by consultation with a CTL staff member, who helps the faculty member design an action plan in response to the findings and provides continued support the following semester, as the faculty member implements changes to the course and assesses their effectiveness. All work products are the property of the faculty member, who retains them at the conclusion of the consultation process.

Scholarship Consultation Process
The scholarship consultation process supports individual faculty members as they pursue their scholarly agendas. Topics include envisioning a new area of research, setting goals, time management, and support for writing.


Continuing Series


Faculty Writers' Circles
This cross-disciplinary peer review group meets monthly to review participants’ manuscripts for overall structure and organization prior to submission. The process results in a higher rate of acceptance to peer-reviewed journals and often sparks interdisciplinary research collaborations among the participants.

Mini-Retreats for Scholarly Writing
Join your colleagues for a quiet day of scholarly writing. We provide a quiet space, coffee, and light refreshments throughout the day, lunch, and moral support. You provide the content!

Book Clubs
Over the course of an academic year, faculty members meet monthly to discuss a book on a particular aspect of teaching and learning. Participants exchange ideas on how to implement what they’ve learned in the conversations into their own classes.

Brown Bags
Brown bags are groups that meet over lunch to discuss an aspect of teaching and learning that is of mutual interest. To form a group, please contact us at ctl@nyit.edu.


Long-term Programming


New Faculty Members
New faculty members participate in a full-day orientation prior to the start of their first academic year, followed by monthly workshops. Topics include: institutional data and student demographics; first day of classes; development of a sound syllabus; defining and assessing student learning outcomes; learning styles/teaching styles; campus support services; student advising; student evaluation of teaching; small groups in the classroom; the reappointment process; long-range career planning. Long-term plans for the Center for Teaching and Learning include the establishment of a new faculty mentoring program.

Faculty Writing Retreats
Join your colleagues one day each month for uninterrupted writing time. We supply a quiet space, lunch, beverages and light snacks throughout the day, and encouragement. You bring your laptop and other materials.

Online Learning: An Overview
This eight-week, fully online course lets faculty members experience online learning from the perspective of a student, and introduces the key elements of an online course. Topics include:

  • the changed role of both students and faculty members in the online environment;
  • building a learning community through communication and collaboration; and
  • how to modify course content to best suit the medium.

Participants work collaboratively with peers to analyze and assess online course design elements and technologies, by critiquing online courses in different disciplines. Each participant takes one unit of a course they teach face-to-face and redesigns it for online learning.

Partners-in-Learning
Faculty members pair across schools to observe each others’ classrooms and interview the students. Partners meet regularly to share findings, and all the partners meet monthly to explore selected topics in more detail.

Faculty Learning Communities
A Faculty Learning Community (FLC) is an interdisciplinary group of 6-8 faculty members who meet regularly to discuss topics of mutual interest as they work on projects within a common, mutually supportive environment. Members participate in frequent seminars and other activities, and form a close-knit community that encourages social, intellectual, and reflective discussion.